Moisture damage and mold

I have had some past moisture seepage from upstairs bathrooms into the sub floor. The leaks have been fixed long time ago bu the previous owner, but due to the presumably long term exposure in the past, some small areas of the sub floor (plywood) have turned black. This is mostly in the spots like around pipe holes where the water was seeping through the sub flooring. Is it possible that some of this black damaged (slightly rotten??)wood is also moldy? There are no lighter gray areas that I have previously learned to associate with mold. What is the right thing to do about this type of moisture damage? I can see it from the underside, but if I need to replace the damaged spots in the sub flooring I will have to tear open floor in the bathroom.
I may be putting my house on the market in a few months, so I need to know what level of repair I need to do to avoid potential lawsuits. I expect that I need to remove all the material that I know is moldy, but should I also replace all the sub floor that has turned color due to the moisture.
Appreciate any constructive input.
Pietu
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 18 Mar 2007 19:38:59 -0500, pietu <pietu1_at_juno_dot_com> wrote:

I've seen plywood turn black, from water exposure, but it never appeared to be mold to me. If it's dry now, I've heard mold needs moisture, then there is no mold then right?
Might want someone to check it for you, a quick visit from a handyperson, they can check if it's still structural.
Just a guess.....
tom @ www.FindMeShelter.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I once had mold on a basement sheetrock wall. The mold died when the room went back to its normal dryness, but the surface stayed black.
So I think there was dead mold. So what do you mean by "no mold"? Does that include dead mold?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A good wiping with bleach and a coat of oil base paint or spray paint. Brushing is more green friendly. This should take care of it for good.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In most states you only have a duty to tell the potential buyers. Check your local law and decide if a good repair is cheaper or more expensive than the potential hit in price. Usually a discount is cheaper.
"pietu" <pietu1_at_juno_dot_com> wrote in message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This is correct- you only have to disclose the issues you had and if any damage is there that you know of. Black mold is very common. Toxic mold is fuzzy and three dimensional. Any mold can make you sick if your allergic to it. Its only the toxic molds that can cause the severe health problems.
learn more at www.moldshield.org
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.