Mixing oil and gas

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Yes, a follow up to my leaf blower question. I'd rather move on and learn from this. I *do* know that 2-cycles require a proper mix of oil in the fuel, and I *did* read the manual, but I managed to screw it up for a variety of reasons.
Given that I'm not the only person with a busy life and crazy-ass distractions, how do YOU try to make sure that you get the right oil mixture in your yard tools?
US measurements are just the first of many ridiculous parts of the equation here (sorry, traditionalists). You get a 32-ounce gallon (or 64-ounce two-gallon) container and some other container for the oil and directions to put (say) 6.4oz (out of 8oz in the container!) in the gas -- but who has a fluid measure with tenths marks? Not to mention that the containers themselves are opaque (the cans, at least, by federal law) and unmarked with fill lines or any such. (One can ensure an even two gallons via the gas pump, but that supposes a 100% empty container to start with.) Eyeballing it, which is what I have always done (without seizing engines in the process, either), just seems risky now.
[In any case, I don't think it was a poor mix on my part, but use of the wrong container in a rush.]
So, you have to have some gas sitting around for various purposes. You don't want to run to the Shell every time you need to touch up the driveway or whatnot. You may need to have different mixes for different engines (no oil for the 4-cycle mower, 40:1 for the leaf blower, 50:1 for the chain saw, etc.). The containers aren't well designed for this task. The measuring system is ridiculous. Math is involved. Yet a mistake seems like it can kill an engine.
Do you mix each one in advance, or add the oil on fueling? What do you measure with? Do you label and separate the containers? (What do you do if you label something 40:1 and then forget to mix it once?) What do you do with leftovers (mixing fresh gasoline with mixed, or the last 1.6oz of oil)? Is there a visible color change you can get used to in seeing the fuel (and legal transparent containers to keep it in)? Has some smartypants invented a device which does the mixing for you, and is available if you call 1-800-GAS-MSTR in the next fifteen minutes (but wait, there's more)? Surely somebody has put their brains to this problem before.
I found one google result for "pre-measured 2-cycle oil" -- the Mantis products offer a kit with six just-the-right-amount containers. Surely there's more?
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<snip>
If it smokes badly or fouls the plug, then I add more gasoline.....
<g>
--

SVL



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For 32-1 you get a 8oz can of lawn boy oil and add 2 gallon of gas to an empty container. For a different mix Echo oil may come in a different oz for a different mix. Or use the wifes measuring cup and follow directions. Old gas goes in the car or boat, simple, dont make it hard.
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.....Nope......
Its not "old gas"--its simply too rich for the machine, due to engine combustion temperature and pressures, also bearing design and material......
Why in the hell should I dump it into an engine having no need whatsoever for lubrication within the fuel path ???
I have already paid a premium for that oil, in money and time, and it actually adds negative value as fuel for the car.....the fact is, doing this will make a four stroke motor more prone to detonation......
Now, ( conversely ) .....another thing always I do is add a little more oil if the 2 cycle engine doesnt smoke a little bit--pretty close to what the OP has been doing all along
A little smoke is a good thing......
Now "old gas" is what I dump into the diesel tractor, but that is a different story altogether--and dont you even THINK about asking what it is *I* do with old diesel....<G>.....
--

SVL





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OP asked what to do with old gas, for me thats 6 mo or more, and he mentioned left over. Usualy it lights my outdoor fires, i was just giving an idea to start fresh so he knows whats in his can. I usualy now only mix a gallon at a time and run all equipment 32-1 Having different mixes is tough.
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Sheesh....you guys are just too damned easy......
Thats pretty close to what I do, but also I will vary up or down depending on the age, condition and manufacturers recommendations.
And of course the amount of smoke produced in the exhaust........
Cheers,
--

SVL



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Wen you need to top off a can, add (say) 1 gal (128 oz) exactly -- most gas pumps inticate to 0.001 gal now) and for 32:1 (say) add 128/32 = 4 oz. The unknown amount of gas in th ebottom of th egas can is already 32:1 the new is 32:1 so the result is 32:1 -- if you mismeasure a little and end up at 28:1 or 36:1 you'll be okay, but 16:1 double) or 64:1 (half) you'll be in trouble, especially w/ the latter!
Agree metric would be easier (except you'd likely mix 15:1. 25:1, 30:1 etc. vs 16:1, 24:1, 32:1, as you're no longer working in powers of 2.
A disposable (gas/oil resistant) plastic measuring cup, a dedicated pyrex glass measure or a 60cc syringe can be useful or 2:1 oil in a translucent container w/ measurement marks can help.
Mix as little extra as possible unless it will be used in a reasonable time (weeks/months not years)
Harder is if you have several 2 strokes, one taking 20:1 the other 32:1 or 40:1 mix for now you need two cans, clearly labeled, and you need to remember who's who, then there's th e4 stroke gas w/o oil...\\

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I don't use enough "mixed" gas to make large batches so I buy those 6 packs of the oil, one of which when added to 1 gallon or so of gas makes the proper mixture. I can almost use it up before the season is over. I also now label the gas can as to what the mix is for along with when I mixed it.
All manuals now go in a manilla folder that contains nothing but tool books/rcpts/info.
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Dan Hartung wrote:

Well, my method works for me. I have two containers. One for straight gas (mower) and one for 2 cycle. I buy my gas in the first container. At the beginning of the season I measure out a quantity from the first container to the second and add oil. I use metric measuring since it is easier to figure ratios. You may have to buy it in gallons, but there is no requirement about how you measure it.
If needed during the year I do it again. At the end of the season whatever is left in the two cycle container goes into my girlfriend's car (I have a diesel) along with the contents of the other container.
It works for me.
BTW, the ratio for mixing need not be dead on. You should aim for close, but exact is not required. If in doubt go for a little extra oil. If too much it will smoke and you can add a little more gas.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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First, you buy two completely different looking containers. I have a big one for the mower, small one for the gas/oil mix for the chainsaw and snowblower.
I use the same mix for both. One states be 40:1, the other 50:1, so I use 40:1.
Next, buy oil in a container that has a measure. Got mine at Wal Mart. It is a two section thingies and you squeeze the bottle and fill the reservoir. Markings tell you that you have enough for one gallon, etc. No math involved. Dump the oil into the container, then take it to the gas station to fill putting in the proper amount. I mix one gallon as I use little of it in a year.
Leftover after a year gets duped into the mower can. Usually it is less than half a gallon mixes with two of straight gas. Never had a problem with that. Any gas at the end of mowing season get dumped into the car. Ed snipped-for-privacy@snet.net http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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wrote in message

and just so your girlfriend doesnt decide to do you a 'favor' (or any number of other instances where someone else might be using your stuff) get a sharpie permanant marker and write 40:1 oil/gas mix for xxxxxx (blower, weed eater, etc..) on it. and write on the other tank something like lawn mower only.
i wont go into the details, but i do this to every gas can now...
randy
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Great suggestion. I wanted to get another color, but the only one at Ace besides red was blue, and then only for 5-gal cans.

Yeah, I've now seen those containers. That is a great idea.
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wrote in message

blue cans are for kerosene. not the end of the world, but its still best to put gas in red cans so someone else doesnt get confused. just get a small 1 gallon can and mark it well with the gas/oil ratio you are using it for.
randy
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wrote in message

GAS BEFORE PUTTING IT INTO YOUR CHAINSAW....
Sometimes the wife may do you a favor by straightening up the garage and putting things where she thinks they belong. If you always check for a "blue" tint, you'll be doubly certain...
Andy in Fink, TExas

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xrongor wrote:

Roger that, then. Thanks!
Now, red I can understand (a quick google shows that blue is kerosene and yellow is diesel), but why must it be opaque?
And why *isn't* there a separate color for oil-gas mix? Sheesh.
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because you would need to use about 100 colors to cover all the possibilities. although you can always go down and buy a can of spray paint...
randy
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This isn't rocket science:
1. Buy 1 gallon of fresh premium fuel 2. Measure 3 oz of Mobil MX2T in a plastic measuring cup 3. Add it to the gas and shake the jug 4. Replace this mix every season.
Use this mix in everything that needs 2 cycle fuel mix. The ratio of oil to fuel is based on oil technology vs engine technology!!
On Mon, 31 May 2004 01:36:27 -0500, Dan Hartung

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davefr wrote:

Hi, True. But the mix ratio is anywhere from 1:25 to 1:100. How can your mix cover all 2 cycle engines? I have only weed eater and chain saw using oil mix, and yes, I have only one jug for both. But everything? There are so many 2 cycle engines out there. Also I use old mix if left over and there has been no problem. Both engines start on couple pulls every spring. Tony
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Is mobil MX2T synthetic , where do you get it
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Once again, the ratio specified by the manufacturers had more to do with the oil technology at the time then with the engine technology/design. 2 cycle oils have improved so much that even the old 16:1 engine recomendations get better lubrication using 40-50:1 assuming the newer oils are used. (the old 16:1 oils were probably Group I dino's where the new 50:1 oils are typically a highly advanced synthetic.)
You don't need a seperate jug for each mix as long as you use a modern 2 cycle oil. I've done research and Mobil MX2T is one of the best. (available at Autozone)

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