Mixing motar?

I have an old house and am repointing some bricks. I would like to know what the mixture ratio is for cement and sand. I have heard anywhere from half and half to 3 times sand. I have to have an almost white color so I can't use the premixed motar. What I have been mixing ( half and half) seems to fall away when it dries. Thanks for any help.
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W. Wells wrote:

Use white cement if needed. (5) sand - (1) cement - (1) hydrated lime.
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If it crumbles when it dries, either your cement is too old, or you didn't use enough water. Also, you should wet down the existing mortar and bricks before applying the new mortar. Otherwise, the existing masonry will suck water out of your new mortar and weaken it.
G Henslee's recommended mix is good advice. You really need some lime in there to increase the workability of the mix; it makes the mortar stickier, too.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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W. Wells wrote:

How old is that home? Using modern mortar on old brick can cause damage. You may need a special mix to prevent damage.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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Hmmm.... never heard that before. Can you be more specific?
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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It's important that the mortar not be as hard as the bricks. Old bricks were not as hard as todays bricks, but the old mortar had much more lime than todays mortar. If you try to use a new -0high cement mix mortar with the old softer bricks, the faces of the bricks will start to spall off.
John
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Mean People Suck - It takes two deviations to get cool.
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wrote:

Thanks, John - do you have any idea why that is?
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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Not a friggin clue, but to make a wild assed guess, I'd say that materials all move, even something as rigid seeming as a brick wall, and when things move there's got to be some give: you engineer that give into the mortar while it's the bricks that give the strength to the wall. If the mortar is stronger than the bricks, then you're trying to make a concrete wall with very large aggregate.
John
--
Remove the dead poet to e-mail, tho CC'd posts are unwelcome.
Mean People Suck - It takes two deviations to get cool.
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firstly, old mortar was almost always made with slaked lime and not cement. if you are trying to point brick, the marshaltown.com (the trowel company) has an excellent tutorial. i have pointed thousands of chimneys and walls and have yet to see new mortar as the cause of brick deterioration, water infiltration causes spauled brick and can enter brick directly or via wicking from foundations or roofs. i will share the secret to pointing learned from an irish immigrant bricklayer...use a pointing bag and a mix of three parts course silica sand to one part masonry cement (plastisizers added to portland) never wet brick prior to pointing or you'll have a mucky mess and ruined wall...tool the mortar joint and then lightly mist the entire surface pointing with water to allow a slow cure of the joint. the longer the cure (the misting) the stronger the mortar joint/bond. the powdering of mortar joints is caused by rapid drying and lack of hydration. it is difficult to not have the mortar turn white as it is bleached by the sun. white portland tends to be a stark or striking white which will not likely match your existing mortar.

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