Mixing latex paint with concrete

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Is it possible to mix black latex outdoor paint with saccrete to give the c oncrete color? I know there are some poweders you can buy for color, but I cant find the exact shade.
Also, I know this is a dumb question but I have a blacktop driveway that ha s cracks, crevices, alagatering, etc. I don't have the money to replace the entire driveway. Could I skim coat the bad parts with concrete? Even if it only lasts a year it would be worth it.
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Is it possible to mix black latex outdoor paint with saccrete to give the concrete color? I know there are some poweders you can buy for color, but I cant find the exact shade.
Also, I know this is a dumb question but I have a blacktop driveway that has cracks, crevices, alagatering, etc. I don't have the money to replace the entire driveway. Could I skim coat the bad parts with concrete? Even if it only lasts a year it would be worth it.

Both ideas sound dubious to me. Why not just get some crack sealer, then paint the driveway with some of the liquid asphalt sealer that can be squeegeed on?
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On Wednesday, May 21, 2014 9:18:44 AM UTC-4, Mayayana wrote:

yeah use crack filler and topcoat with the type that has anti skid in it.... plus they sell a skim coat type of material.
my driveway is approaching 35 years old and does require maintence. ideally it needs replaced....
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote in

No. The concrete will never harden properly.

And you think you *will* get the exact shade with paint??
Use the stuff that's made for the purpose.

Patch concrete with concrete, patch asphalt with asphalt.
Why are you always trying to do things the quick-and-dirty way, instead of taking the time to do them *right*?
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On Wednesday, May 21, 2014 9:32:53 AM UTC-4, Doug Miller wrote:

Assuming the only purpose of the concrete coloring is for it to be used for the asphalt driveway, no need to go into that any further. There are many products for asphalt repair, so why reinvent the wheel? For color matching, just seal coat the whole driveway. The big question is if the driveway is repairable or shot. When it starts to alligator in more than just an isolated spot or two, it's basically done. Any repairs are unlikely to last long.
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On 5/21/2014 9:32 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

Because he never has time to do it right, but he always has time to do it over?
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On Wednesday, May 21, 2014 6:08:50 AM UTC-7, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

concrete color? I know there are some poweders you can buy for color, but I cant find the exact shade.

has cracks, crevices, alagatering, etc. I don't have the money to replace t he entire driveway. Could I skim coat the bad parts with concrete? Even if it only lasts a year it would be worth it.
A skim coat of concrete will crack and flake the first time you drive over it. It may even do it just by stepping on it.
Harry K
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Mike wrote:

Wrong thread. That should be in Stormin 'Dad's Wise Sayings'...
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On Wednesday, May 21, 2014 8:08:50 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

concrete color? I know there are some poweders you can buy for color, but I cant find the exact shade.

has cracks, crevices, alagatering, etc. I don't have the money to replace t he entire driveway. Could I skim coat the bad parts with concrete? Even if it only lasts a year it would be worth it.
There are some spots where chunks are missing and a few small spots where g ravel underneath is showing.
I know what sealcoat is, but I did not think it could be used to "fill" in surface defects.
The only thing I found at Lowes was a bag of cold patch compound. It was ba sically a bag with a hard piece of asphault in it. I could not see how you would get it to conform to an irregular shape.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote in

It can't. Who said it could?

Probably an old bag. It's not *supposed* to be one hard chunk.
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On Wednesday, May 21, 2014 12:25:21 PM UTC-4, Doug Miller wrote:

For smaller defects they have other liquid type crack filler. There is also a product I've seen online that comes in sticks, you heat it with a torch, dribble it in to the cracks. But how effective any of that is, how long it will last, is it worth it, depends on how far gone it is. I'm also having trouble picturing "small spots", where gravel is showing. Usually you only see that in what I'd call large spots, but I guess it's all relative. If gravel is showing, then the above crack fillers aren't going to work. The bad part needs to be taken out, then the cold patch product that he saw in the store would be used to fill it in. I wonder how old this driveway is and how thick it is?
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

See below.
My take on this is that yes, you can replace water with a similar amount of latex paint when mixing concrete and end up with similar or even stronger concrete than if only water was used, even if up to 66% of the water is replaced with paint.
The tests performed by the State of Florida (see below) was aimed at diverting the maximal amount of discarded household latex paint possible into slabs of concrete poured as pads around various municipal buildings are work yards. If the goal is to simply color the concrete, then it is probable that a much lower amount of paint would be needed to achieve the desired result, and the effect on workability (slump) and long-term strength would be minimal or even improved.
Web searches for "Paintcrete" should yield a lot of useful info and data.
=============Making Concrete Pavers and Flagstones DIY Projects
How to Add Color to your Concrete Project
1. Paint – Yes, you can add latex paint to your concrete mix and the color will go throughout the whole casting. It must be latex paint but it can be any color or mixture of colors. This is an option that calls for a lot of testing. If you use the regular gray cement your color will be affected. Try to use white cement. If you’re using sand mix, plan extra time for testing. It will take much longer than you think to determine the right formula for the color you have in mind.
2. Dry color additives – These are added either during your mixing or sprinkled on top of your pour. You can sprinkle one color and then another color to achieve a natural stone look. This finish can wear in time also since it is a surface pigment.
3. Liquid color additives – These are mixed into your concrete before you pour and color the entire cast, not just the top. Testing is required. This is the stuff you see the guy pouring into the cement mixer just before he pours a driveway.
http://www.pobox355.com/how-to-add-color-to-your-concrete-project/ ============== Adding Latex Paint to Concrete
By Concrete Construction Staff
Q.: We're bidding a job that requires a white concrete floor. Another bidder has proposed mixing white latex paint in with the concrete. Can this work?
A.: We checked with two experts in applications of latexes and other polymers in concrete, and neither has heard of this practice nor believes it would work. The latex used in paint is not compatible with portland cement, so adding latex paint to the concrete mix could make a gooey mess. If any of our readers have tried this, please tell us your experiences.
We recommend you stick to the proven methods of producing white concrete surfaces: use white portland cement, color concrete with a titanium dioxide pigment, or apply a white surface coating.
http://www.concreteconstruction.net/paints/adding-latex-paint-to-concrete.aspx
================ Paintcrete Concrete made with left over latex paint admixture Final Report Feb 20, 1996
Florida Dept. of Environmental Protection Agreement #HW275 Unique or Innovative Household Hazardous Waste Grant In Partnership with Okaloosa County, FL
- a way to divert the household hazardous waste stream - by incorporating these materials into concrete)
The question is can this be done while maintaining the structural integrity of the concrete, ie, design strength?
- descriptions of several test samples and slabs poured using old latex paint during 1994.
- the most controlled test consisted of 250 gallons of paint mixed into 17 cubic yards in the form of a slab 25 ft by 37 ft.
- All tests resulted in a hard, functional slab, but failed compressive strength tests.
- However, in every instance, the masons had added so much extra water that it practically liquified the mix, which probably resulted in sub-standard strength.
In late 1995 they performed the most controlled batch design where the amount of water was very carefully rationed. They made a mix consisting of 1.5 cubic yards of concrete (containing 5 gallons of water) to which they added 10 gallons of paint and then 1 gallon of water. Normally, 1.5 cubic yards of concrete would contain 15 gallons of water to get 3000 PSI strength. Instead, their modified concrete contained 6 gallons of water and 10 gallons of paint. The concrete had a slump of 1.25 inches and compression strength (at 7 days) of 3909 PSI (130% of design strength).
They added 1 gallon of water to get a slump of 3.25 inches and that sample had strength of 3472 psi at 7 days. Finally they added 1 more gallon of water to get a slump of 5.75 inches and it had a strength of 2996 psi at 7 days.
Full report, including test results and pictures:
http://www.dep.state.fl.us/waste/quick_topics/publications/shw/hazardous/household/PaintcreteGrantFinalReport_1996.pdf ================
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On Wed, 21 May 2014 13:32:53 +0000 (UTC), Doug Miller

Because he's "stryped" He doesn't need any other reason.
Always enough time and money to do something over, and over, and over - never enough to do it right.
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wrote:

Forget stepping on it - just LOOK at it the wrong way.
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I believe that mixing latex paint with cement mix would work and give you a coloured concrete.
But I don't believe that concrete (with or without latex paint in it) would stick well to ashphalt.
I'd mix up a small batch and see if it works.
--
nestork


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On Wednesday, May 21, 2014 10:56:43 PM UTC-4, nestork wrote:

It doesn't matter if it sticks or not. A thin coat, even it sticks, is going to crack and fail. Even brand new asphalt is far more flexible than concrete. And old alligatored concrete is far worse.
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On Thursday, May 22, 2014 5:27:07 AM UTC-7, trader_4 wrote:

Yep. A thin layer of concrete has almost no cohesive power.
Harry K
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On 5/21/2014 11:25 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

It is NOT a hard chunk, it only feels that way because it is vacuum packed. I buy about 10 bags every spring to fix the pot holes in the street in front of our home (city cannot afford it) and they always feel like on big hard chunk until the bad is opened.
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Harry K wrote:

Bunch of fools.
Anyone who works with concrete knows that if you don't clean the tools right away, that "thin layer" is a bitch to remove later when the concrete / cement has cured.
I've repaired spalling and flaking in the surface of poured patio slabs with thin layers of mortar (ie - sand and cement, no stone) with the repair being as thin as 1/16 of an inch in some areas, and after 10 years that layer is still bonded to the concrete slab. Even a decade of freeze/thaw hasn't lifted these patches.
The key is to clean the substrate so you can god damn eat off of it before you apply the resurfacing.
There are bonding "helpers" that, interestingly enough has a latex component (looks like white, milky stuff) that you paint on and before it dries you apply the overlaying cement / mortar mix patch.
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On Thursday, May 22, 2014 10:10:24 AM UTC-4, HomeGuy wrot e:

Try putting that thin 1/16" coat on an asphalt driveway, which is what is proposed here, then drive a car over it. Drywall mud will also stick to tools, but a thin coat of it is easy to crack, and then it falls apart. Sticking <> lasting. A thin coat of cement on an ashphalt driveway, especially an ashphalt driveway like this one that is alligatored and failing, is going to flex way more than is required to crack it.
Why do we even wind up in threads like this? There are products for repairing asphalt, ie cold patch, crack filler, sealer, etc. They have the right properties. Thin coats of cement, do not.
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