Miter Saw from harbor freight ?

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Anyone here ever used this sliding miter saw from harbour freight ?
Any good ?
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber891
Thanks
James
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We used one to install about 5000' of base board and crown molding. It has started to fall apart. The blade guard is now broken and a few other pieces have fallen off but it still works and paid for it's self.
cm

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Any good for what?
It's a $99.99 sliding miter.
Search the web for name brand 10" sliding miter saws and see what they cost. Even with a *substantial* price adjustment to account for the name brand, you'll never get close to $99.99 or even the $139 regular price. Odds are there's a reason for the price difference.
I guess it all depends on what you need it for and how long you need it to last.
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Well, these are both good replies, from Darby and cm.
I would use it to cut perhaps ten boards a year. I am not a carpenter, or much of a handyman. I have a circular saw that I use a few times a year, but I just find that I am not "handy" at using it to cut a perfectly straight line !! I am making some shelfs soon, and very simple items like that.
Yes, I suspected it would be on the lower quality side........... but it might last me for 30 years, at ten boards a year. 5000 cuts as indicated by cm is amazing for a $99 saw !
Thanks again, and I welcome further comments !!
James
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I bought one a few years ago. Have had no problems with it except a minor one. It doesn't _quite_ cut all the way through stock that is against the fence. Leaves about a 1/8" "tit" easily trimmed with a knife. Haven't looked to see if the fence is adustable.
For occasional use I would recommend it for the price. Undoubtedly a 'high quality' one will last longer but I don't see that it would be any more accurate than the HF one. Everyone does not need a professional tool.
I even use it as a 'chop' saw cutting framing memebers to length. The nice part is being able to see _exaclty_ where the cut will fall.
I don't do all that much work with it anymore as all my buildings are now rehabbed. I do wish I had been smart enough to invest in a sliding mitre saw many, many years ago regardless of cost.
Harry K
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In that case, it will probably fit your needs. I wouldn't consider it but my needs are different than yours.
Note that the cutting capacity if 5 3/8" and that a 1 x 6 is 5 1/2". That can be a PITA. A regular 12" miter saw will cut about 8" but will cost considerably more.
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If you lift the front edge of the board slightly, you can easily complete the cut on a 2 x 6 on a saw that only claims a DOC of 5 3/8". Make your cut with the board flat, then just tilt the board up enough so that a few more teeth on the front of the blade complete the cut.
I do it all the time with my Delta 10" non-slider.
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If you lift the front edge of the board slightly, you can easily complete the cut on a 2 x 6 on a saw that only claims a DOC of 5 3/8". Make your cut with the board flat, then just tilt the board up enough so that a few more teeth on the front of the blade complete the cut.
I do it all the time with my Delta 10" non-slider.
******************************
I can see nasty repercussions if not done properly though.
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That statement applies to the use of *so* many power tools as well as *so* many other situations in our daily lives.
BTW...after I posted my method, I was watching one of the multitudes of "home" shows on TV and so one the supposed experts apply the same technique.
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wrote in message

That statement applies to the use of *so* many power tools as well as *so* many other situations in our daily lives.
BTW...after I posted my method, I was watching one of the multitudes of "home" shows on TV and so one the supposed experts apply the same technique.
*****************************
That may be true, but I'm still not going to advise someone that may have never used a power saw to turn the board while the blade is spinning at high rpm.
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re: turn the board
Are you sure we're talking about the same thing? Are you equating my use of the word "lift" with "turn"?
I would never tell someone to *turn* a board while cutting it, unless it was a scroll or band saw...
...or if they were cutting a circle on a table saw.
I just did that for my daughter last weekend. Cut her a perfectly round 17" circle out of 3/4 MDF. I love that technique.
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Lifting the front edge of the board while the rear edge stays against the fence amounts to turning it about its long axis. I think it is safe enough to do after the saw arm has bottomed out as long as you hold the saw arm still.
Cheers, Wayne
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re: I think it is safe enough to do after the saw arm has bottomed out as long as you hold the saw arm still.
Which is exactly procedure that is used.
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I have the 12" version of the same saw. It works fine and is plenty accurate for casual home use. Certainly light years ahead of cutting with a hand saw - manual or power.
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wrote:

For occasional use it may be OK for your needs. Also check Sears, they have some Craftsman non-sliding saws that may be better quality.
Just remember: you get what you pay for!
If you are not in a hurry, wait till spring. With the economy headed down, construction work falling off, you will see some at flea markets this summer as construction contractors start selling off their tools. I've gotten some really good deals that way in the past. A used Makita or other name brand will be an investment while the HF tool is just a disposable purchase.
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Doesn't the sliding type miter saw allow for wider cuts ?
James
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Yes, a lot wider. Mine will miter 45" on a 2x6. I think it goes wider than that but it does go at _least_ that far.
Harry K
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Harry K wrote:

Jesus! 45"! That is more than my Radial Arm saw will do! My 12" sliding compound will only cut about 14" at most. What size is yours?
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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wrote:

Any reason having both radial arm and the slider? I have both but didn't use the RAS the last few years.
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Frank wrote:

The RAS is for framing and can rip if needed. It is permanently setup at my shop and I use it mostly for framing and rough cutting. The SCMS is for trim and more fine cutting as it is much more accurate and is portable. I also have a 10" CMS and an 8" CMS and a 10" MS. A tool for everything. If you want to throw in the old manual mitersaw, I have a total of five.
But then, that's what happens when you are a contractor.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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