MIN DISTANCE FROM EDGE OF SINK TO NEAREST ELECTRIC OUTLET

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hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

F! the code and whether the current recepticle should be grandfathered or not. Replace it with a GFCI because it's close to the sink. (any kitchen countertop outlets far away from the sink should be grandfathered; you may or may not want to replace them anyway.)
Bob
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replying to RBM, Ray J wrote: could you please cite the 24 inch rule... I need to show it to somebody...
I need to find where it is written down.
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On Thu, 03 Nov 2016 19:44:02 +0000, Ray J

You are not going to find it. The 24" rule applies to the distance between receptacles serving a kitchen counter, You can have one on the wall directly behind the sink if you want although it is a horrible design. The rule about sinks is any receptacle within 6' of a sink must be GFCI and all counter top receptacles in a kitchen have to be GFCI
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On Thu, 03 Nov 2016 19:44:02 +0000, Ray J

According to code any outlet within 6 feet requirea a GFCI
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Any non dedicated above counter outlet within 6 feet of an open water source must be GFIC protected. A sink counts.
I am not sure why all the other posters felt the need to be so difficult.
And yes a home inspector is going to cite it as problem even if the house 150 years old.
--
Colbyt
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Colbyt - Thanks for the first straight answer to what I thought was a straightforward question.
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Colbyt - Thanks for the first straight answer to what I thought was a straightforward question.
I don't exactly know what type of answer you're looking for. You didn't ask what would be required by current code. You certainly don't intend to bring the wiring in this house up to current code, or you'll pretty much have to gut the place and start over. Regarding kitchen counters, all receptacles are required to be GFCI protected, not just those within 6' of a water source.
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.
Well said. It's odd that the answer he likes is wrong. The question asked was how close an existing outlet in an old house can be to the kitchen sink without being GFCI. It was answered many times. There is no requirement that the outlet in question be brought up to current code. At least not in the vast majority of places. There may be some localities where it is required, but they are the exception. There are likely dozens of similar things you could find in the house that do not meet current code.
Regarding the home inspector, good chance they will point it out and suggest that for safety it be made GFCI. Does that mean the seller must do it? No. The seller can simply respond that it's grandfathered and it's not a requirement. How about if the home inspector says the 20 year old furnace is nearing the end of it's life? Must the seller replace that too? Of course, in the case of the outlet, if it does get flagged, it might be better to just make it GFCI, especially in this real estate market.
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Well said. It's odd that the answer he likes is wrong. The question asked was how close an existing outlet in an old house can be to the kitchen sink without being GFCI. It was answered many times. There is no requirement that the outlet in question be brought up to current code. At least not in the vast majority of places. There may be some localities where it is required, but they are the exception. There are likely dozens of similar things you could find in the house that do not meet current code.
Regarding the home inspector, good chance they will point it out and suggest that for safety it be made GFCI. Does that mean the seller must do it? No. The seller can simply respond that it's grandfathered and it's not a requirement. How about if the home inspector says the 20 year old furnace is nearing the end of it's life? Must the seller replace that too? Of course, in the case of the outlet, if it does get flagged, it might be better to just make it GFCI, especially in this real estate market.
That's exactly my point. I do this for a living and deal with it constantly. It's essentially like gfretwell said, the buyer send over a "house inspector" who's job it is to write up everything he can think of that isn't perfect with the house, then the buyer uses the list to lower the price of the house. If the seller wants to upgrade certain things to make the house more saleable, that's fine, and a good idea, I just question it, when a house inspector infers things like installing a gfci in a bathroom, makes it code compliant
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The other wild card in the mix is the insurance company. A lot of these guys are requiring a "4 point" inspection before they will pick up a house and that may be troubling for a lot of things that are otherwise grand fathered in. From what I am hearing any fuse panel is not allowed, even if it is a totally code conforming type S panel. Personally I would want to fight that but insurance companies will usually win that fight.
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Years ago I would get that a lot from insurance companies, mostly in light commercial sales, and pretty much converting to S fuses solved the problem. Today, all parties concerned hemorrhage if there's a fuse panel involved. It's not even worth debating, you just upgrade the service
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om...
Well, the house does have fuses, about 15 separate circuits. The kitchen outlets in question are on a circuit that is separate from the other two sets of kitchen outlets. Much of the wire is BX, with some 14/2 G romex, that is easy to spot in the basement. There is a dishwasher, I don't know if it is on a separate circuit or not.
I will offer to replace the close-in outlets in the litchen and bathroom with GFCI ones to address any safety issues. Anything more than that will be up to the seller and buyer to agree upon, assuming the house does sell.
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On Thu, 13 May 2010 16:38:27 -0700 (PDT), "hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net"

Everyone here has said that if it is above the counter, it is required by current codes to be GFCI protected.
Does that mean you have to change it?
No
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..
But the outlets closest to the sink are about 28" from the edge of the sink and I will be replacing one duplex outlet with a GFCI and slaving the second pair of outlets in the same box from the GFCI just for safety and to help sell the house so prospective buyers will have one less thing to haggle about.
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But the outlets closest to the sink are about 28" from the edge of the sink and I will be replacing one duplex outlet with a GFCI and slaving the second pair of outlets in the same box from the GFCI just for safety and to help sell the house so prospective buyers will have one less thing to haggle about.
That's fine, just preface your inquiry by saying that you want to doll up your friends house to make it more appealing, then ask what you should do regarding older outlets and wiring. As gfretwell said, house inspectors will write up anything and everything they like. This doesn't mean that the homeowner is required to do anything, unless they choose to. If you want to upgrade outlets, make all of them grounded, if a grounding means exists, and use gfci outlets in garage, basement and outside, as well as the kitchen counters. You might want to think about smoke and or CO2 detectors as well.
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wrote:

Some codes develop from OSHA standards. They state 6 feet from a water source. If you had a 3 ft sprayer on the sink...it would within 9 feet from the sink for a GFI. I'm not saying this is the case...just FYI.
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