Milwaukee = Ryobi?

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On May 15, 11:10 am, snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com (Chris Lewis) wrote:

To me that goes w/o saying although I know that it isn't so for many. In essence then, we're agreeing but I surely didn't get that message from your previous posts--I certainly thought you were trying to make a case that Milwaukee wasn't producing anything in the US. So, if I misinterpreted, sorry, apparently I was also tilting at the wrong windmill... :)
BTW, the answer to the question of where the 18V hammer drills were _actually_ made is (surprising me) the Czech Republic. True for the old one and the very recently acquired one both...
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I was trying to make the case that it's not clear how much they're manufacturing in the US, but it doesn't matter...

It happens to all of us ;-)

My father worked for a couple of years as a sales engineer for a heavy industry manufacturing group based in Czechoslovakia, _before_ the Soviet empire came apart, let alone before the Czech and Slovak republics parted ways. Rock crushers, pumps in the 100+ HP class etc (for mining industry etc). "Won't win beauty or engineering elegance prizes, but _tough_ and lasts forever".
Add a bit of engineering elegance and shift to retail, and you have Milwaulkee ;-)
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
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On May 15, 1:12 pm, snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com (Chris Lewis) wrote:

Yes...in a former life I worked with a line of ash and elemental analyzers for online monitoring of coal. A fair amount of the heavy gear in the prep plants was of East European origin...

What surprised me was that one has become conditioned to offshore cheap manufacturing to mean SE Asia or, maybe, Mexico for those who jumped on the NAFTA bandwagon. That eastern bloc countries are for the most part also still in the cheap labor camp has pretty much fallen of the radar screen...
I thought it interesting that the decision had been made and the location selected obviously long before the takeover. My _really_ old red gear is, of course, labelled USA, but that's going back 50 years to most of it. I hadn't had any need for buying something I didn't already have for quite a long time and came to the high power battery drill _very_ late in the game so didn't have anything of intermediate age to try to compare with...
BTW, "Milwaukee" has only one (1) "L"... :)
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The underlying issue on the "radar screen" front is the US bleedout on trade. The US had a $725.8 billion trade deficit in 2005 (>$200B with China alone, ~$70B with Canada). That's US dollars going over "there" (and some "here", to reference the other followup to my posting ;-)
[Canada had a $55B total trade surplus in 2005. Last time the US had a trade surplus was in 1975.]
I wouldn't include the Czech Republic in the cheap labor camp. It's advantage comes from a long history of industrialization, good education, and relative stability (compared to many other eastern bloc countries). The standard of living there has been pretty comfortable for several decades, and wages are moderately high compared to other places in the eastern bloc.
The parts of Czechoslovakia that _didn't_ have as much of that went off on its own (relatively peacefully!).
With the Czech Republic, it's a shift of manufacturing with good education, infrastructure etc backing it up. Not _new_ manufacturing and all of the long-term education/infrastructure buildup that needs.
Yugoslavia had the same potential advantages, but the "going off on their own" bit was hardly peaceful and set them back decades. Tho there are sectors still doing well.
--
Chris Lewis,

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dpb wrote:

Supposedly, so does Chicago. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago_'L'
--
It\'s funny how quickly liberal atheists can develop a belief in hell
when someone they hate dies.
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wrote: | > ... | > | > > I have been through several Skill, Craftsman, and Black Decker | > > cordless tools over the past few years and been rather disappointed in | > > all of them. Nine months ago I bought a combination set of tools from | > > Ryobi and couldn't be happier with their performance. The overall | > > qualitiy of the tools is good and their performance has been well | > > above that of the previous tools. | > | > .. | > | > Well, w/ those as comparatives, you're in at least the same general | > range of target market. TTI of course, began as a manufacturer for | > Sears/Craftsman and then built the Ryobi brand and got the | > distribution deal w/ HD from that experience/basis. While I haven't | > looked in detail for several years now, it would be surprising to find | > they're not still making a fair amount of stuff for Sears. I've not | > investigated the Skil/B&D actual manufacturing relationships enough to | > know of any possible connection in production facilities although one | > would presume they're not contracting for them, even that wouldn't be | > out of the realm of possibilities. | | I was talking with a plumbing company the other day who was also using | Ryobi tools. Caught me by surprise that they would be using them | since their load demand would far exceed mine. I ask them if they | were happy with the tools and the quality. Their answer was that | while the tools were not as good as say the Dewalt brand, their cost | was so much lower that they could by three or four and still save | money. Their experience had shown about 3/4 of the use at 1/4 of the | cost. Still seems like a good value. | |
bought a Dewalt screwgun recently and the motor burned out before we finished the 1st job with it, what a piece of crap Dewalt is. my Milwaukee is still going after 25 years of abuse. I hope the new Milwaukee tools last this long.
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I haven't bought a new DeWalt recently but have certainly been well pleased w/ the miter saw which was the last yellow tool. As far as one can tell simply looking, they appear to still be the same as then, and still got good ratings in last comparative reviews I've seen so can't say whether any degradation is an overall product line or a specific tool or line of tools or whether you just got unlucky on a particular tool...
And I note no one has yet taken the time to guess (or look up) the point of manufacture of the Milwaukee 18V hammer-drills before/after the TTI buyout. :) I did look at the (almost) brand new one to compare to one of vintage before for comparison... that I mentioned having looked at
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