Milwaukee 14.4v cordless drill - which to buy?

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I am in the market for a cordless drill / driver. I'm not interested in one of the cheaper 3/8" drills (Skil, B&D, etc.) but for my modest DIY uses I probably don't need the top-of-the-line pro models either.
Being very happy with Milwaukee jigsaw I've bought a few years ago, I'm leaning towards one of their 14.4v 1/2" dril / drivers. The specific models are the 0612-22 Compact Series drill and the 0616-24 Lok-Tor drill. The 0612 is a bit smaller and lighter, but the Lok-Tor beats it in torque (460 vs. 390) and run time. The Lok-Tor also has a side handle. One think that bothers me about the Lok-Tor is that it is a "new" product; in most cases this is a good thing, but in this case I really want to hear that the new product is better (esp. considering Milwaukee is under new ownership).
Pricewise, it looks like the Lok-Tor 0616 will run me about $20 more than the 0612.
So, what I'd like to hear are any reccomendations between these two models from someone who has used both. If you feel strongly that I should the 18V model, or get a different brand (Panasonic, DeWalt, etc.) let me know that too. Thanks.
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I have the 18v Dewalt set. Powerful, heavy and some times hard to get into places. Did I mention heavy?
If your just doing some DIY stuff I suggest that you consider the Chicago brand by Harbor Freight. Last time I looked their 18 v drill was 40 bucks. Personally if and when I need another cordless I will consider the 14.4v stuff. Size is important when trying to get the drill into places. I own corded drills that go up to half inch so power is not a problem. It is not that big of a deal to string a cord for me at least.
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If this is your one and only drill, you might want the more powerful one.

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If it is his one and only drill he should consider getting a much cheaper corded one first.
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Why? Corded drills are horrible screwdrivers. Any drill can drill a hole. What sets a good cordless drill apart is its ability to drive screws (via a clutch and electric brake).

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Everyone should have a corded drill as their primary/backup
So that when those wonderful battery powered ones die 3/4 of the way through a job, you don't have to wait for the battery to recharge.
And don't start the "they should have a second battery ready in the charger all the time" argument. As no one ever does. <LOL>
If you can plug in a charger, you can plug in a drill.
And to be honest, a REAL SCREWDRIVER works great too, a bit slower, but NEVER has to be recharged or plugged in <g>
AMUN

one.
cheaper
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I just find something else to do as the battery charges. It only takes an hour or so.
Have you ever tried driving a 3" screw using a manual screwdriver?

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As a hobbyist, I question the need for a backup for any tool. It is a great way to save money.

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On Sat, 03 Sep 2005 19:22:38 -0400, Amun wrote:

I have one. Somewhere. Actually I found it a few weeks ago, after not using it for at least five years, but had lost the chuck key. Oh well, it's a lump o-junk anyway. I simply put it back where I found it. No harm.

Buy decent tools and they won't dissapoint you. I bought a 12V Makita over ten years ago. While the batteries are starting to go, it's still useful (as are the other tools I bought using the same batteries). My main drill now is a Porter Cable that makes the Makita look sick. ...both are usefull though. If I needed to drill a 2" hole in a concrete wall, no I wouldn't use a cordless drill.

Perhaps stipid people don't. One of my batteries (from any tool) is always in the charger. The day before I do a significant work I swap and charge them. As others have said, it only takes an hour to charge a battery.

The charger is in the basement on my workbench. The drill (right now) is in the bathroom behind me, where I used it all day. Let me guess, you only use the drill to clean the buggers out of your nose. Heh, my beard trimmer is cordless too. Go figgr.

You *must* be a troll (and not the brightest one in tha pack). Try driving a few thousand deck screws by hand.
--
Keith


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Agreed. When there's heavy work to do, a cordless drill just doesn't cut it as far as I'm concerned. I've got a Milwaukee 12v cordless and I use it whenever I can, but my 120v Milwaukee hammer drill is there and gets used when the going gets really tough.
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Upscale wrote:
Somebody wrote:

IMHO, bullshit.
I used an 18 VDC DeWalt driving a 3" hole saw to cut a hole in the aft end of the keel for the propshaft tube of the boat I'm building.
Drilled a hole thru 3/4" of epoxy and double bias knitted glass.
By comparison, drilling that same hole thru a piece of hickory is a piece of cake.
Had to replace the bimetal hole saw, but the drill is still working.
BTW, my corded drill is a 1/2" right angle unit for drilling large holes with a hole saw.
Lew
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Great, you've got yourself a very capable cordless unit. Good for you. I'm sure that next you're going to us that the cordless DeWalt will outpower any and all corded drills.
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"Lew Hodgett" wrote in message

My _primary_ drill is also an 18v DeWally, with two batteries that have been rebuilt by www.primecell.com (and having experienced the before and after, that was key to turning it into the hoss it is) ... I rarely have to bring out the corded 1/2" drive Milwaukee, but I am glad it's there.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 8/29/05
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Hmmm... I bought my Dewalt 18v cordless drill, and I haven't used my corded one since. No reason to. And, as a matter of fact, I do usually have a second battery ready in the charger. As soon as I take a battery out of the drill because it's dieing, it gets slapped into the charger. Even when I was building my deck, I wasn't able to out-pace the batteries. They charge in an hour, and it took me longer than that to wear them out.
Clint

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....

Perhaps. Mine has not been touched since I got a cordless about 5 years ago.

I have two ready to go.

Right, but the charger will charge a battery a few feet from the receptical while the battery powered drill can be taken hundeds, thousands, of feet away and still work, no extgensio cord needed. Damned handy to have cordless up on the roof.

True, but putting in those 2 1/2" screws up on the second floor for shutters was much faster using a powered tool.
People used to ride horses and cut firewood with hand saws too, but few will today. But don't let me stop you from enjoying old technology.
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Put me in the "me too" crowd here also. One battery is always in the charger (Milwaukee has trickle charge, so no harm is done to the battery this way, it actually keeps the battery from discharging by itself), the other on the drill.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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On Sat, 03 Sep 2005 19:43:52 -0700, Mark & Juanita wrote:

If it's a NiCd or NiMH battery, a constant trickle charge isn't good for it. I leave mine go, until I know I'm going to need it. I charge one the day before, then swap batteries after the "uncharged" one gets a little light.
--
Keith



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Milwaukee manual indicates that no harm will come to battery by leaving it on the charger. I probably didn't phrase this right, the trickle charge is not constant, but the charger keeps the battery near full charge, re-charging when it drops some (don't know what the threshold is).
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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On Sat, 03 Sep 2005 20:18:12 -0700, Mark & Juanita wrote:

Cycling a battery in the charger may not be a good strategy either. There is a maximum number of recharge cycles for batteries. NiMH is worse than NiCd here, but NiCds also have cycling "issues".
--
Keith


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New chargers shut down, not trickle. Maybe some cheap ones still do.
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