Mildew on clothes

Well, the non-domesticated genius here left a load of towels in the warsher overnight and then hung them up to dry, and they now have this nice mildew smell. What's the best non-lethal treatment? Wash with vinegar? Chlorox (can't do this on the colored ones)....
Hep me before the lovely miseries gets home....
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just rewash and dry like a normal mode of wash.
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On 7/9/2016 1:13 PM, Snuffy "Hub Cap" McKinney wrote:

You can use a touch of bleach safely, about a quarter cup. Re-wash and you are good to go.
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I had a roommate, who instead of telling me the steam radiator was letting condensed steam run down the radiator and damage the hardwood floor, just too my thermal blanket from the closet and used it soak up the water. What a clod he was. I didn't find out about until he moved out (I had kicked him out, for non-payment and all-around obnoxiousness**.) I took it to the laundromat and washed it and it smelled just as bad when it was done. Then I dried it, hotter than I use now but not especially hot, and it smelled perfect after that, and never smelled bad again. Some of the tan parts of the blanket were white after wash/dry, but that was because of the mildew, not any bleach I used, because I didn't use more than 1970's detergent.
**He's the one guy I wanted to find on Netscape, I mean Facebook. I can't find him. I suspect he's dead. His future didn't look good.
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wrote:

Snuffy-
Hanging them in sunlight may do the trick. If not, re-washing may be enough to eliminate the smell.
Clorox may be OK if diluted. I would think a quarter cup for a washer load, would not affect colors enough to notice.
Fred
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On Saturday, July 9, 2016 at 12:14:47 PM UTC-5, Snuffy "Hub Cap" McKinney w rote:

ew smell. What's the best non-lethal treatment? Wash with vinegar? Chloro x (can't do this on the colored ones)....

more like they soured sitting in the washing machine after spinning. Mildew has black spots whereas soured items just have that awful soured smell. Rewashing them, NO BLEACH, will remove that smell.
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On Saturday, July 9, 2016 at 12:14:47 PM UTC-5, Snuffy "Hub Cap" McKinney wrote:

nice mildew smell. What's the best non-lethal treatment? Wash with vinegar? Chlorox (can't do this on the colored ones)....

more like they soured sitting in the washing machine after spinning. Mildew has black spots whereas soured items just have that awful soured smell. Rewashing them, NO BLEACH, will remove that smell.
Thanks JNJ. These are old towels about ready for rags. Some have had the sour smell for several weeks. Tried washing and rewashing before with no success. I'll try adding vinegar and TSP, like I use when the washer starts smelling.
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On 7/9/2016 1:13 PM, Snuffy "Hub Cap" McKinney wrote:

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On Saturday, July 9, 2016 at 1:14:47 PM UTC-4, Snuffy "Hub Cap" McKinney wr ote:

ew smell. What's the best non-lethal treatment? Wash with vinegar? Chloro x (can't do this on the colored ones)....

front load washer is likely the culprit??
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On Saturday, July 9, 2016 at 1:14:47 PM UTC-4, Snuffy "Hub Cap" McKinney wrote:

nice mildew smell. What's the best non-lethal treatment? Wash with vinegar? Chlorox (can't do this on the colored ones)....

- front load washer is likely the culprit??
This one's a top loader.
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in message Well, the non-domesticated genius here left a load of towels in the warsher overnight and then hung them up to dry, and they now have this nice mildew smell. What's the best non-lethal treatment? Wash with vinegar? Chlorox (can't do this on the colored ones)....
Hep me before the lovely miseries gets home....
== I put 2 cups distilled white vinegar, 1/4 cup baking soda and whatever the recommended amount of liquid ERA was for a low load, set it to hot wash, warm rinse, dumped the stinky towels in. One wash got out nearly all the smell. Ran it once more and the smell was completely gone. Will see how they smell after a few days.
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On Wednesday, July 13, 2016 at 5:54:50 PM UTC-5, Snuffy "Hub Cap" McKinney wrote:

warm rinse, dumped the stinky towels in. One wash got out nearly all the s mell. Ran it once more and the smell was completely gone. Will see how they smell after a few days.

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Smell on cotton towels and socks still coming back again. Here are a couple of other remedies. I'm going to try a combination, and soak for a few hours in hot water with vinegar, baking soda and regular deterent, then wash and hang them up outside in the sun. Will post how it works out....
How to Remove Mildew Smell from Towels http://www.wikihow.com/Remove-Mildew-Smell-from-Towels
Good info but hard to read on desktop monitor. Huge graphics showing someone opening a washer, etc.... not necessary, and much excess and repeatitive wording.
Here is a summary of that info....
Method 1 - Washing Towels With Vinegar and Baking Soda
Put towels in washer, start hottest cycle, add 1 c. white vinegar and 1 c. baking soda only. No detergent. Stop machine after all is well mixed and let soak for 1 hour. Turn on and finish wash/rinse/spin cycles. Run wash cycle again, adding 1c. vinegar and detergent. After rinse, run extra spin cycle. Put in dryer and run on hottest setting until completely dry. Run dryer cycle again.
Method 2 - Soaking Towels in Detergent and Hot Water
Add 2/3 of a cup of Oxiclean to a large bucket. Fill bucket halfway with hottest water possible. Add boiling water if needed. Stir until dissolved. Immerse each towel when adding. Soak for 48 hours Remove towels, wring out and wash in hottest cycle with detergent (fabric softener optional) Dry on high heat until completely dry.
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On Thursday, July 21, 2016 at 2:15:20 PM UTC-5, Snuffy "Hub Cap" McKinney wrote:

If it is, do you leave the door open once you have removed the wet clothes to the dryer? If not, you may want to start doing that to enable the door, its seals, and interior drum to dry out.
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Yes, I always leave the top open. It's a top loader, so-called high efficiency, supersonic spin. GE WHRE5550K1WW. No agitator or lint filter. Top of large loads never get wet. Lint left on the clothes which stops up the drain and loads up the dryer filter. A real first class boat anchor.
Now it's coming back to me.... I had to put a tee in the standpipe because it pumps water out much too high flow for the drain pipe, a standard size when the house was built in the 60s, but smaller than pipe size of new houses.
I'm counting the days until something brakes and then it's going out on the curb with a sign "Free - and don't bring it back."
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in message

Yes, I always leave the top open. It's a top loader, so-called high efficiency, supersonic spin. GE WHRE5550K1WW. No agitator or lint filter. Top of large loads never get wet. Lint left on the clothes which stops up the drain and loads up the dryer filter. A real first class boat anchor.
Now it's coming back to me.... I had to put a tee in the standpipe because it pumps water out much too high flow for the drain pipe, a standard size when the house was built in the 60s, but smaller than pipe size of new houses.
I'm counting the days until something brakes and then it's going out on the curb with a sign "Free - and don't bring it back."
More on the washer... no matter how you put the clothes in, something gets twisted and you have to "untie" the sleeves or pant legs. Sometimes the wrinkles from the extremely high speed spin have become permanent.
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