mice in the walls

i've got mice chewing away at my house from inside out. somebody recommended a plug in device which emits a noise that's supposed to drive them away, but this doesn't seem to do a thing. i could lay poison or traps, but not if i can't get to them (i'm not sure where they got it). anybody have some good tips on dealing with this?
tks
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Greetings,
Often people have mice so they set one little trap where they think the mouse might be. Traps are 4/$1 at my local dollar store. That means for $5 you could purchase 20 traps. If you don't know where the mouse is, and you hate them as much as I do, consider placing a trap everywhere anywhere near where you heard a mouse. This is what I do for my tenants and they love the results. Once the infestation is gone the zillion traps can be removed.
Hope this helps, William
PS: If you ever find a hole in wall shove it full of poison and close it off. If you know what wall they are in and for some reason you don't like traps or poison on the ground (pets and tots maybe?) you can try the following:
a) remove a receptical or light switch (you don't have to disconnect the wires-- the receptical can be unscrewed and pulled away with the wire still attached) b) remove a "knock-out" from the box the outlet is in if the box is metal c) put poison down through the hole d) put a knockout plug back in the hole e) screw the receptical back on
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" snipped-for-privacy@wdeans.com" wrote:

....
But unless the access point(s) is/are then removed, the problem <will> return...
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Bad idea. VERY bad. Then they die inside the wall, and it takes days to figure out where the stink is coming from - then you have to tear the wall open to get the carcass out.
Much better plan is to close off the holes through which they're entering the building; set traps to catch them running around; and patch the holes in the interior walls only when you are no longer catching mice in the traps.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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This is a problem with rat carcases but I have never found it to be a problem with mouse carcases. Most mice just aren't big enough to cause much of a stink for any length of time in a properly ventilated house. Depending on conditions sometimes they don't even rot at all but instead dessicate and mummify. I must poison a dozen plus mice per year in various houses and I have never had to open a wall except to remove a large rat.

building
I am sure that many buildings have holes which mice enter. However, at least for me I believe that just as many mice are accidently brought into the house. Often times a tenant will move into a roach-free mouse-free house without any problems and within a few days they will be complaining about roaches and mice ("just like at the old house"). I must therefore conclude that the tenants brought the roaches and mice with them when they came. At one point in my life I parked at a commuter station where the the garbage attracted mice. Before long I found one in my garage that I have no doubt hitched a ride home with me as I later found a dead one in my trunk!!!
Hope this helps, William
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Spoken like a true landlord. I was one myself for 15 years, but I never accused the tenants of that. It would be so unlikely probabilistically, that I'd consider 10 other sources first. And eventually I'd find all the outside entrances. Unfortunately, it's a tedious job. However, bug infestation is more likely via boxes or furniture........
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Yeah, that came in with the tenants! I had some pieces I picked up from what looked like a well-kept apartment. I went over them thoroughly with a brush and some wet towels. Cleaned them off, top-to-bottom, inside-and-out. I had to put them in storage for a while and happend to have a really big set of plastic bags left over from some other new stuff. I sealed them (a chest and a bureau) up into the bags and left them in storage for about a year. Lo and behold when I opened the bags there are not just a few but *hundreds* of dead roaches. Bottom line, if you're in a place that has currently has infestations then moving, by itself, with not solve it. Bomb the place when empty, move in, entirely unpack and bomb it again.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com says... :) This is a problem with rat carcases but I have never found it to be a :) problem with mouse carcases. Most mice just aren't big enough to cause :) much of a stink for any length of time in a properly ventilated house. :) Depending on conditions sometimes they don't even rot at all but :) instead dessicate and mummify. I must poison a dozen plus mice per :) year in various houses and I have never had to open a wall except to :) remove a large rat. :) :) With mice having such a small range there is more of a chance of one dying in a wall and they can stink to high heaven. I definitely won't use bait on an indoor mouse problem unless the customer insists and then it is with the understanding I will not be the one looking for the smell.
--
Lar

to email....get rid of the BUGS
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The humidity is obviously fairly low where you live.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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wrote:

Set traps out anywhere in the general area where the mice are, baited with food. The mice will find it. I've found the most effective to be the conventional spring trap, baited with a raisin. Smush the raisin down onto the bait pan. They can't get it off without springing the trap.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Dica wrote:

Think cat.
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i've got two, but not the most agile. they've managed to catch one, but this other mouse is actually in the wall and i've seen no evidence it's making it's way into the main part of the house.
anyhow, thanks to all for the responses. sounds like poison might not be such a great idea (could get smell or, even worse, poison my cats should they decide to eat the corpse). i think i'm going to have to try regular traps. this is going to be difficult though. i suspect they might be getting in through an opening near the roof side trim. if this is the case, trying to lay traps here is going to be a real pain. i suppose that if they aren't into the main part of the house, they will be soon and i guess i can lay traps in anticipation of their arrival.
again, tks to all for the responses. some good ideas here.
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boa constrictor or python
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