metric carpenter's tape

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Twenty years ago I bought a Craftsman tape marked in mm on both edges. It was so much easier and more reliable than fractions for reading and remembering measurements that I bought a spare.
Eventually, the first one broke. I want to buy a third in case anything happens to my second one. The only ones I've seen have mm on one edge only, and that's not as good. Mine is especially good because the marks for mm 1,4,6, and 9 are shorter than the others, which means I can read it without counting lines.
Doesn't anyone in America sell metric carpenter's tapes?
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This is Tater. Try here http://www.perfectmeasuringtape.com/shop/steel-tape-measures/series-85m
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Tater Gum Fries wrote:

Thank you! They even have a 3-meter model. I could keep my 7.5 on the shelf and use the little one most of the time: easier to carry, cheaper to break.
They would be perfect if the pattern didn't have 4 adjacent marks of the same length. On my old ones, there are no more than two adjacent marks of the same length (2 and 3, 7 and 8). That means my eyes don't have to count little marks. I wonder why it's not common.
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wrote:

Just go through the tape once scraping the paint off the ones that should be shorter. (yeah, I wouldn't wnat to do that either, but...)

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On Sat, 1 May 2010 13:18:22 -0400, "Tater Gum Fries"

Lee Valley has an 8 meter version:
www.leevalley.com
Paul F.
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Ace Hardware.
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wrote:

I believe we converted to metric several years ago.
But we may have abandoned tape measures.
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mm wrote the following:

In what State?

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
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We tried in the 70's, but it did not get very far. The US and Burma are the only two countries in the world that do not use it. More and more though, companies have to or die. As an example, if you want to make tooling for any of our machines (none are made in the USA), it must be metric. Yes, some toolmakers try to convert, but they tend to have problems with accuracy.
Eventually we will change, but many people are afraid of change, afraid to learn a new way, others think the rest of the world should change to our standard.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I just want a tape scale that's easy and reliable. In the 1980s I measured to replace a board. Let's see... 29" and.... more than half.... less than 3/4.... less than 5/8... more than 9/16... 19/32.
Write it down. Go through the same process finding the line to mark the new board. Cut. Measure. 28 and 19/32. The fraction was such a distraction that I went on the wrong side of 29 inches.
When something similar happened a few months later, I went metric. 29 and 19/32 inches is 752 mm. What could be simpler?
One thing that makes my Craftsman metric tape so easy to read is that no more than two adjacent mm lines had the same length. Dadburnit, I can't find another marked like that! All English tapes use differing lengths for the marks. Why are manufacturers so backward with metric tapes?
And metric/English tapes? It's like trying to run a race with one shoe on. You may use one edge most of the time, but in some situations you need to use the other edge or accuracy will suffer.
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I had a tape once; metric inches.
Used to enjoy loaning it out.
Lemme see your tape.
Sure!
WTF...?!
It ran away. -----
- gpsman
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gpsman wrote:

Using a surveyor's tape marked in hundredths of a foot was one thing that inspired me to get a metric carpenter's tape. Another thing was making desktop measurements of charts. The metric side of the ruler worked better.
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gpsman wrote:

Snort! Ain't it fun, messing with people like that?
--
aem sends...

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On Sun, 02 May 2010 01:44:42 -0400, mm wrote:

Thomas Jefferson wanted a decimal system:
1585 A decimal system for weights and measures is proposed (by Simon Stevin, in his book "The tenth").
1670 Gabriel Mouton, Vicar of St. Paul's Church in Lyons and an astronomer, proposes a metric system. Authorities credit him as the originator of what was to become the metric system.
1790 Thomas Jefferson proposed a decimal based measurement system for the USA. A subsequent vote in the USA congress to replace the current UK-based system by a metric system was lost by only one vote.
1790s Investigations conducted into reforming French weights and measures, which result in development and adoption of the metric system. Credit for authorising this is variously assigned (depending on which document one reads) to Louis XVI, Napoleon and the National Assembly of France.
1795 The metric system becomes the official system of measurement in France
1840 Metric system compulsory in France since this date.
1800s International support for metric system grows. International scientific community switches to metric system.
1900s By 1900, 39 countries had officially switched to the metric system. By the end of the century virtually all countries, with the USA being the only notable exception, had switched to the metric system.
1959 UK and USA redefine the inch to be 2.54 cm. In 1963 the UK redefines the pound to be exactly 0.45359237 kilograms. In 1985 the UK redefines the gallon to be exactly 3.785411764 liters. The USA took similar steps, although the USA gallon is smaller and consequently has been redefined as 3.785411784 liters.
1960 The metric system officially renamed to "Systme International d'Units" (International System of Units), and given the official symbol SI.
Current The metric system has been adapted by virtually every country, with the only notable exception being the USA (the other non-metric countries are Liberia and Burma). Some countries (such as the UK) are still in transition to the metric system.
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Kuskokwim wrote:

Isn't the Imperial Gallon 4.54609 liters?
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Kuskokwim wrote:

US <did> officially adopt it, but just never enforced it. Remember for a few years, highways were signed both ways, and speedometers also had KM scale? Booze/pop went metric a couple decades ago, cigarettes have been metric for ages, spark plug threads were always metric, most film was metric, etc, etc. Anybody manufacturing for an international market is a fool if they don't document it in metric, and use metric fasteners. Computer screws are mostly metric now, so that coffee can full of 6/32 screws won't ever get used up. (At least drive makers that put both size mounting holes are labeling them now...)
I'll note that Canada, long since officially metric, still uses a long of traditional measurements in real life. Older folks still like the old British 'stones' for human weights. 4x8 plywood (although the thickness is called out in mm now), 2x4 studs, etc. Land deeds in US and Canada can be anything under the sun, and they are all legally valid, as long as both parties understand and agree what the units are. Miles, feet, decimal meters, chains, rods, acres, hectares, sections, whatever. Ammo is still labeled and sold both ways, at least in the smaller calibers.
I can live with the mishmash, except for one thing. Engineers that use SAE heads on metric bolts, or vice-versa, should be shot.
--
aem sends...


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Not sure if we should blame the engineers. A lot of those mongrel combinations are Asian, mostly Chinese in my collection. I think they feed their screw machines with metric hex stock, so the bolt heads are never 5/8", for example, but 19 mm would be just fine with a 3/4" socket. Worse yet, years ago, was working with British Whitworth. Hardly anything was a standard measurement. Old timers that dealt with MG TC's and TD's will remember the frustrations.
Joe
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Joe wrote:

No, first time I ran across it, it was definitely an engineer. A '71 Ford Pinto, with the metric German engine. But they stuck the low-buck US alternator on it, 'cuz that was what their supply chain and assembly line was set up for. The engine itself had metric bolt heads, but the accessories and the rest of the car had English bolts, or at least bolt heads. I guess they didn't dress the engines in Germany, or it couldn't come up through the fender wells with the accessories on or something. Natch, I rounded off one bolt head, so I grabbed another out of the junk box, and WTF? It would not thread into the hole on the front of the engine. Then I started looking closer and cussing. It was a long time ago, but I think a trip to the auto parts store was involved, and I know one bolt head ended up a different size. Next poor SOB that worked on that POS probably cussed too.
Good thing my brother was into VWs- back in that era, lots of DIYs didn't have metric in their tool box.
--
aem sends...

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Why would you want one? Material is all in imperial units. You never have to take into account the size of the material?
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On Sun, 02 May 2010 10:23:29 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Don't believe that. The thinner 1/2" plywood, sold as 15/32 is really 12mm. That 2x4 that isn't quite 1 1/2 x 3 1/2 is a 44x88. It is almost impossible to find ceramic tile that is not metric.
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