Metal roofing

I'm replacing the metal roof on my porch with a lighter weight metal. Do I put the gasketed screws on the ribs or the flat part?
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Hi All,
Short question. Long answer?
Many people are using metal roofing in my area. But, they often use barn or garage metal roofing which is attached using exposed metal screws, directly thru the roofing to the underlying plywood or trusses. Home metal roofing is attached in a different manner, very expensive to install.
Anyway, I'm told that with the garage metal roofing, the roofing expands and contracts as it heats and cools. The screws loosen in the wood and/or elongate the holes thru the metal roofing as the roof works back and forth. Leaks develop, etc. Home metal roofing is installed in a different way.
I've heard of no complaints about their metal roofing. Can anybody tell me if the above problem is actually a problem? One may be able to tolerate minor leaks in a garage or barn but not a house. The source of the above information is a very good carpenter/builder, knows his stuff, and keeps current with building codes.
Email me directly if you want.
TIA, koyaanisqatsi
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Built a metal roof over porch because of low slope and our heavy snowloads. If roofing screws loosen or pop, I can say I;ve seen any. As for leaks, no. Not if you install with recommended accessories and seam it proper. Suspect most leaks and fails are due to improper instal and cutting corners on the accessories.
-- Troweller^nospam^@canada.com
Remove the obvious to reply. Experienced and reliable Concrete Finishing and Synthetic Stucco application in the GTA.

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Comparing flying a kite with jet air travel. Residential roofing is done much different than barns. My only objection to metal is the cost. I was quoted about 3X a good shingle room. That is probably changing also.
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U get what u pay for. When is the last time u used asphalt shingles????? The price of oil has pushed prices up while making manufacturers sleaze out on the amount of bitumin used. The current shingles sold will fail prematurely so don't expect 15 to 20 years. Metal roofing is good for 50+++++ years.
-- Troweller^nospam^@canada.com
Remove the obvious to reply. Experienced and reliable Concrete Finishing and Synthetic Stucco application in the GTA.
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True, but I'm only good for about another 20.
It was maybe 4 years since the shingles went on. I'm sure the price of both went up. At the time, I could buy a 40 year shingle for $4500 and the metal was about $16,000. I could not justify the difference.
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i built a barn about 20 years ago and used metal roofing with those nails that had rubber washers. it hasnt leaked any that i coud see. we got a old house back on the farm we rent ,it has an aluminum roof put on in the 20s or 30s and its still good... lucas
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I live is snow country, and there are lots of metal roofs around here. I'd say metal outnumbers shingles.
Most houses I see have the colored metal with the exposed screws, which is what I had on my last house. I talked to lots of contractors, many of them friends of mine and they all raved over the metal. The metal is screwed to the roofdeck, but if there are shingles underneath, strapping needs to be used since the metal will expand and contract and can wear from the shingles.
I never see "standing seam" roofs on residential homes around here, only on commercial buildings, so I don't know much on that. I've not heard anything about holes elongating. In fact, I've removed metal roofing and don't remember anything odd about the old holes. I don't think it's an issue. I know folks with 20 or 30 year old metal, and the surface needs new paint, but no one ever complains about leaks. The new products now have "baked on" finishes that have impressive warranties for the paint.
The only thing I did not like about my metal roof, is that it makes it difficult to walk around up on the roof for chimney cleaning, painting etc.
jeff

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Standing seam roof? Make clips to attach to the roof and lap over your "ribs", then the rib caps will cover the clips. More work for you, but a better roof(i.e.,no through-fasteners). Tom
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Simple flat roof covering a back porch. Do I get these clips at my neighborhood Home Depot? Thanks for your help

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No... not standing seam... kind of like a shed roof

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Sounds like a manufactured system. I'd look for instructions or ask the person who sold it to me. TB
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Didn't this stuff come with instructions? Unless I'm missing something, it's either flat seam(soldered), or standing seam, right? The clips are easily made by using a similar(if not the same) type metal to avoid galvanic response(fasteners, too). Let's see if this makes sense: Cut strips about 1 inch wide by the height of your seams plus approximately 2 inches. Lay the panel down in place, set clips bent at 90 degrees onto the roof next to the panel, and nail it down. Put 2 together, about every foot, 'cause one will hold the first panel, the next will hold the adjacent panel. The part that travels up along the seam is bent over the seam, holding the panel down, and the ribs are installed over the seams, hiding the clips. Then the ribs are riveted through horizontally. Or just screw the panels down with the gasketed screws. Or hire a qualified person. G'luck. Tom
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Ha!! No... unfortunately, it didn't come with instructions. Now I understand what you were talking about. Thanks a bunch for the help! I had seen it done with and without screws.

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softballguy wrote:

If you are talking about the kind of metal roofing that has sort of an upside down V grove or called a Rib, about three or five depending on type, then the gasketed screw will go in the center top of the rib. Make sure is fairly centered a straight, and do not over tighten, do not allow to demple the metal.
Also best to use felt unless just a shed.
I would not use on a house, although if installed correctly less likely to leak, best to use the standing seam type. Those have a 90 degree angled edges on each side, where clips attached on one side and the corrasponding edge on the next panel snaps (or is seamed) over the previous edgel hidding the clip holding that edgel down (clip is also fastened to the roof with a screw or nail).
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I think you want what is called Standing Seam metal roof. All of the fasteners are covered. I have one and am very happy with it.
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