Metal Halide Arc bulbs for home? Crazy?

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I wonder if I can use the following bulbs to light varios areas of my home where I like to have a lot of light:
400 watt BT37 Mogul Base Coated Horizontal Burn +/- 15 degrees High Output Position Oriented Metal Halide Sylvania Light Bulb (Sylvania MS400/3K/HOR 64498)
Our Part #: SL64498 Manufacturer: Sylvania Manufacturer Code: MS400/3K/HOR Price: $93.99 Each Case Size: 6 ($563.94/Case) Specifications Light Output: 33,500 lumens Energy Used: 400 watts Average Lifetime: 20,000 hours Bulb Type: BT37 Base Type: Position Oriented Mogul Color: 3,200K CRI: 70 Length: 11.5 inches
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Sure 33500 lumens , so you always wear sunglasses, by a pair for the dog too. You might even fade your furniture.
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m Ransley wrote:

Maybe he could mount one in a closet someplace and use light pipes to light the whole house from that one bulb.
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But you will be the envy of all your neighbors. With a nice tan year round
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Ignoramus4324 wrote:

What kind of weed are you planning to grow?
You can use them, but they are going to be bright and if you have many of them, don't be surprised if you get a visit from the cops.
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Joseph Meehan

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wrote:

Well, the joke was great, but I am not planning to grow weeds. Although I do have some house plants that could benefit from some good light in winter.
I was hoping to be able to use them in my garage. I often work in it and would like to have very bright lighting there, somewhat approaching daylight. It makes things pleasant. I have some fluorescent lights there, but would like even more light. Hence my question.
Essentially, I would not mind a visit from the cops all that much, I have nothing serious to hide. I cannot see, though, why they would decide to visit, but that's all beside the point.
The questions are, essentially, are they suitable for garage lighting. Do they emit harmful UV and is their light pleasant for eyes.
I have no experience with MH lights.
Thanks
i
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"Ignoramus4324" wrote:

MUCH SNIPPED
There have been a couple of incidents around here (Portland / Lake Oswego, OR) recently where Halide lights in school gymnasiums (ok gymnasia to the Latin /reek scholars) had cracked outer coatings. The lights emitted a_LOT_ of bad UV stuff; several students and teachers apparently suffered serious and permanent eye damage. The exposure was over a several month period, AIUI, and there was no obvious indicator that the bulb outer coatings were cracked.
Me, I'd stay away from them in the home / garage / workshop setting.
And I say that living in an area where from about now to mid April where our "daylight" is usually a cold wet grey cloudy dim mess. I like "bright", but won't take unnecessary risks.
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Jim McLaughlin

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On Mon, 28 Nov 2005 09:36:14 -0800, Jim McLaughlin <jim.mclaughlin> wrote:

Thanks. You raised a great issue and I would not want to take any eye damage risk. Would it make any sense to enclose them into some appropriate (rated for heat input) glass diffusers of any sort? Glass is a UV filter, right?
It looks as though going with more regular fluorescents may be more sensible though.
i
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Oswego,
the
suffered
our
"bright",
I have no idea what, if anything, filters (or absorbs?) UV output from the halide lights. More you filter it though, seems to me the more you cut down the lumens / sq. ft. on your work surfaces. If you filter the Halide output enough, you might as well be using regular fluorescents. The captal cost on the fluorescents has got to be lower than the halides plus additional filters. And the fluorescents adhere to th KISS principle.
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Jim McLaughlin

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I'd recommend the fluorescents for several reasons entirely aside from potential UV emission.
- MH bulbs are _hot_. In a smallish area (a garage would qualify), the directed heat will occasionally be uncomfortable.
- MH systems are expensive.
- Used as overall lighting in a relatively low-ceiling space, MHs will have intense hard-to-miss super bright spots, which will have you stumbling around with purple spots in your eyes.
- I'd rather not have MH bulbs in a workshop, where accidentally hitting one will let stuff out that you don't want...
- MHs are somewhat more efficient than ordinary incandescents, but not nearly as good as fluorescents, and as such, going with a lot of MHs to get a lot of light is going to cost a fair bit to operate.
Your best bet is to use fluorescents as overall lighting, and use floods or spot lamps in work areas where you need it.
I've built my shop with several 8' fluorescent fixtures for overall lighting, and used a variety of quartz halogen fixtures mounted on the ceiling for task lighting. In order to keep costs down, I've used a few 150W and 300W rectangular QH flood lamp fixtures (long skinny QH bulbs) - they're quite cheap. Even cheaper are simple flood lamp holders with PAR30 QH bulbs (45-60W), tho you can up 'em to PAR50s (up to 300W, but I'd stay below 100W because of heating issues) if you wish.
Note that these fixtures are not normally indoor ceiling mounted, and you need to be aware of the fact that they do produce a lot of heat. The ceiling of my shop is drywalled... The inspector didn't question them either.
Note also that I have to be careful not to run into them with large pieces of lumber. Pot fixtures would be nicer, but they're not as flexible. In 10 years or so, I've not broken one yet....
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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wrote:

Makes sense.

Chris, just what is involved in having a "MH system"?
The lightbulbs seem to just need light sockets. I would suppose tat they need robust switches, maybe 0 crossing solid state relays. What else is involved, especially with indirect lighting?

Yes. If I go ahead with them (doubtful at this point), I would use them for INdirect lighting.

Thanks. My problem with fluorescents, is that there "never seems to be enough". I already have 4 fixtures with 8 4 foot bulbs, and that is barely adequate. I want to be able to feel great about the amoun tof light that I have.
i
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They need a ballast (big transformer), and a capacitor. They take thousands of volts to ignite, and thus require special HV socket and wiring from ballast to socket. The ballast will require cooling (fan of) it's own.
A fixture designed for indoor use should have a UV filter option, this is generally a piece of heat tempered glass.
They will generate more UV than standard lights, so more fabric fading is common.
It would be far easier to do it with 250 watt/U bulbs, since they are more common, and work in any position.
For indirect lighting, you can get an outdoor fixture from a box store, in the smaller sizes, that should work. At least enough to try it out.
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snipped-for-privacy@newsguy.com says...

My 400W MH fixtures don't have fans for cooling, just the back of the ballast exposed to air. A lot of warehouse and parking-lot lights use 400W MH without cooling fans.
A good fixture will include tempered glass that absorbs UV, I never had a problem with fading with my MH living room light, and my photographic light meter indicated less UV than daylight of the same intensity. (That's still more UV than you'd get from a fluorescent, but not a dangerous level.)
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Thanks, that's very interesting.
In your living room, which I hope is comparable with my 20x17 ft garage, just how bright does it become with a 400 W MH light? Are you somewhat satisfied, fully satisfied, is it bright like a day, etc?
thanks
i
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@NOSPAM.20878.invalid says...

I no longer have that living room, the MH lights I have now are garage shop lights.
The living room was about 12x24, light intensity wasn't up to summer daylight but was brighter than mid-winter daylight. (The room occasionally doubled as a small photo studio, B&W only so I didn't have to worry about color temperature.)
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This is excellent. What kind of setup did you use, did you direct light upwards? I will gladly spend $200 *if* it gets me a very brightly lit garage.
i
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The point I'm trying to make is that heat is a problem that needs to be addressed, and that it will be a problem if you try and build fixtures in, and not leave them out in the free air.
A small muffin fan is an easy DIY to do cooling, when one doesn't have ability to design and test a better enclosure.
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I have a dozen of 110v muffin fans, all highest quality stuff from military equipment. Here's how I used one of them:
http://igor.chudov.com/projects/Welding/09-Homemade-TIG-Torch-Cooler /
Using one sounds like a good idea!
What do you guys think about this fixture:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&itemu65688942
Thanks!
i
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Watch out for dust build up.

This is where I shop http://www.altgarden.com/site/lightsystems/ltchoice.html I got one of the "vertizontal" reflectors. which is 4' in dia, with a 250w MH bulb.
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snipped-for-privacy@newsguy.com says...

About that part about the especially high voltage:
MH fixtures include the ballast, socket and wiring in between - problem solved. Also, the high voltage starting is for the "pulse start" types, which most 175 and 400 watt MH are not.
Pulse start has an advantage - it allows an arc tube lacking a starting probe, and a "simpler cleaner" arc tube makes those are slightly more efficient and have slightly better lumen maintenance - maybe a little significantly better. Ones with ceramic arc tubes have better color rendering and those are pulse start - but I believe are mainly lower wattages.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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