Metal drilling question: source for cutting oil

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I am just getting into some metalworking projects, and will be doing a substantial amount of drilling (using a Delta drill press). I heard that it is best to use "cutting oil" to facilitate the cut and to prolong the life of the bits. However, a quick search on the web shows that prices start at about $14 per gallon. Are there any alternatives which will do the trick, but not be as costly? How about motor oil? please advise, thanks.
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try rec.crafts.metalworking
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definitely water-soluble oil for ferrous. kerosene is good coolant & oxidation-inhibitor for Al- yes, I've used it safely for years. Most any serious h/w store for the former.
John
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You can probly get some heavy duty thread cutting oil at someplace like home depot.
For use in aluminum, wd-40 will work okay in a pinch.
--
SVL




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"F.H." wrote:

Probably not the "best" choice either, but I've been using bulk pipe threading oil for ordinary mild steel...works reasonably well.
I had some aerosol cutting fluid that worked really well, but the supply places in town I normally go have quit carrying it so I went to a substitute.
We used motor oil here on the farm for years from as long as I can remember, though w/ no major problem...it'll smoke more than some of the other less volatiles will but functions, albeit as FH says, not quite as nicely...
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wrote:

Frank,
Someone was telling me that some old machinist used to use water, but he didn't say anything about using it on aluminum only. He was working with a younger machinist and the younger guy used oil on the tools and the old man had a fit. Have you heard of such a thing? What's the antifreeze looking stuff machinists use that usually smells like puke?
Relz
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msc.com or enco.com sells cutting oils, some mix with water
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HD sells a "Dark Cutting Oil" in a quart container. A few bucks if I remember correctly.

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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Motor oil is not a good choice. If you have any machine shops in your area you could stop by and tell what material you are drilling and they most likely would give or sell you a small amount. If it's aluminum you can sometimes get away with water or water with a water soluble oil added.
Frank Retired machinist.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

For hobby use, 3-in-1 oil should work just fine. Not motor oil, though.
BTW, $14/gallon isn't very expensive when you look at the price of a 4-oz can of light machine oil like 3-in-1 -- maybe three bucks? Works out around a hundred dollars a gallon.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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Water will cool the tool and the work piece but will not lubricate for a better cutting action, plus with only water you'll start to get rust. Heat is what breaks down the cutting edge of a tool thereby getting it dull. I use water soluble oil most of the time we buy it in 55 gallon drums. Cool Tool is what I've been using for more years then I want to admit. Look it your local phone book for Tool suppliers, a quart of cutting oil doesn't cost very much. Tool Producers is what comes to my mind at this time. Aluminum is best cut using oil because it'll give you a better finish. WD 40 will work just make sure you clear the chips off the drill often. (Pull drill out and place back in). If you don't do this the drill will walk off course and cut oversize.
A working Tool & Die maker. TheBoz
wrote:

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Beeper wrote:

He already did...talk to a local machine shop...
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Remember the harder the material the slower the drill speed
Beeper wrote:

He already did...talk to a local machine shop...
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My advice is email F.H. the retired machinist. I've found a man of few words is usually full of knowledge just busting to share it with someone if they would only ask.

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Relz wrote:

Can't recall the name of the antifreeze stuff but I did use it with great success for drilling small holes in stainless steel (back in the day) :) Water works well with cast iron, (maybe that was the reason the old timer had a fit) but I wouldn't use it on any other steel.
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Sir
Drilling metal is a very dangerous process. You should not be attempting this at home. I highly suggest you take your metal to a professional machinest and have them do the work for you. People do not realize that if a drill bit were to break, it could puncture the users heart, causing immediate death. Powered drills are nearly as lethal as a gun in the hands of an amateur. Take your project to a professional who is certified to use a drill press and has all the proper and necessary lubricating oils and equipment. This is not a job for the amateur. For your own good, pull the plug on your drill press and do not use it again, unless you become a certified machinest.
Michael Smithe American Family Insurance
On 19 Apr 2005 12:07:53 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

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TheBoz wrote:

Kinda depends on how many and how soon he needs the parts. Finish, IME, is often not a factor with drilling.

WD-40 works well but the fumes are toxic. Good idea to keep the area well ventilated with a fan.
Frank
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I use a synthetic Castrol product ( Syntilo 9913) for machining aluminum--basically, it's a clear mix having just a bit of a greenish tint.
$200.00 for a 5 gallon tub, solution is ~5 to 7 % in water....I get awesome metal removal rates and run tool speeds upwards to 5000sfm, where it also produces a very superior surface finish.
--
SVL







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2 weeks ago, I couldn't even speel 'Machinist'...
But now, I are one !!!
--
SVL




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Terribly expensive, and suitable only for aluminum....and so it probly wouldnt be a very good recommendation for a small shop, imo...
For general purpose use, I use "Chevron Soluble Oil B" ~ $46.00 for a 5 gallon pail....and mix it to appx 1 quart into a 5 gal pail of water....important that the oil gets mixed into the water...fill the bucket with water first then stir the oil in or else the oil wont stay in suspension....It will go rancid though, especially if you let tramp oil collect on top...it's best to skim it off and run the pump to aireate the mix for an hour or so every few days....
== Most folks don't realize that the water soluble oil also works great undiluted for some the tougher jobs like tapping hardened alloys, etc...just brush it onto the tool full at strength.....
Oh, and one other thing....Ive found this stuff :
< http://www.intercononline.com/jokisch/econo897.htm
to be totally *amazing* when it comes to the toughest jobs...I was getting appx 6 holes per tap on a job ( 1/4-20 in 4340 @ Rc 42) ( was using a black oxide coated Sossner tap, very high quality tool )....at that rate, the job was actually costing me money...a bad bad situation...
I went to using the 'Jock-itch' paste and now I routinely get several hundred holes per tap before replacement is needed.
--
SVL




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