Messed up partition frame help

Hello,
I`d appreciate some advice on a fist-time diy frame up I did and kinda messed up.
I've put up a 7 foot long partition wall that has some studs stick out on one side and indent on the other side. The wood is straight but I fear I may not have built the thing fully plumb and square. On top of that the ceiling has already been put in around it.
The obvious problem with this is that if I put drywall on it, it will be "wavy", not mention that it could crack later on.
Now, aside from taking the whole thing down and redoing it, can I get away with planing and shimming? Are there other tricks to making the thing take a slab of drywall and not cause issues later on?
Any advice greatly appreciated!
Thanks very much!
--PhB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
this is hard to answer without seeing it. yes, shims might be a possibility, though if your studs lean this way and that, the shims would have to be tapered...takes some skill to cut 8' long tapered shims. a lot of times, it is faster to just redo. even if the ceiling is already drywalled, can you remove the studs and then then top plate. fill the hole where the top plate was with a scrap of drywall, and put your new plate on the surface of the ceiling drywall. another thought is to put new wider studs along side the existing screwed up studs, sort of firring both sides out in effect.
the other option is to just leave it. wood studs are seldom straight, and after framing a wall, if you lay a straitedge across them, it is typical to see variations of 1/4 to even 3/8" this isn't that noticeble in the finished product--unless you are putting cabinets against them.
good luck and don't forget to learn from your mistakes!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
When I framed my basement there was a long delay between framing and securing the drywall which resulted in some stud warpage.
As a result there was some stud prep required before drywalling that I hadn't expected.
Take a long straight edge to determine where the wall is flat and where it isn't. Less than 1/8 inch difference shouldn't be visible.
If only a few studs need to be moved you could perhaps whack em a few times and drive a couple more nails.
If you've got to remove one - a sawzall can cut the nails and you may be able to shim and resecure the same stud.
If the stud is warped, a neat trick is to sawzall through half the stud on ann angle and drive a screw to pull the cut together. This will take one large curve and make it into two or three smaller ones.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Cut the studs pull them plumb and sister the cut area with a short piece screwed to both halves, even strips of 3/4 plywood work for this. Figure on about 16" lengths or thereabouts.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks all!! Very helpfull stuff.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.