measuring stuff

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From the building inspector. Codes can vary from town to town, but they usually follow a universal code as a minimum. I don't know of any doors that meet the one hour rating that are not metal, but they may exist.
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As Edwin points out, it varies from place to place. In my neck of the woods, doors between a garage and living quarters have to be fire rated (not sure of time, but every one seems to be steel) with an acoustic seal around it (for fumes) and closed by a spring cylinder thingy (someone will chime in with the name, I'm sure). That ensures that the door won't be accidently left open a crack, which would reduce the fire rating to zero.
The price difference between a hollow core and a steel, fireproof door with auto closure should be considered an insurance payment. Check with your insurance broker, The upgrade might even get you a discount.
Mike
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Or the lack of upgrade may get a cancellation
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Make that - _after_ the upgrade, contact your broker to see if there's a discount!
Mike
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Eigenvector wrote:

Since you are doing it, you can replace with anything you want. You didn't get a construction permit did you (I suspect that some silly jurisdictions would want you to)?
Anyway, you probably don't need a steel door, a solid core is acceptable in some areas. If this is a door from the garage into the house, I would not use a hollow core, even if it were legal. My solid core is very heavy but they aren't that expensive.
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Eigenvector wrote:

In my city, it used to be you just had to have a "solid door" (this was a long time ago). A few years ago, I discovered that it also had to be fire rated. However, I called Home Depot and they said they had solid wood slab doors that were fire rated. Really, the price is not that much more. Even if you didn't care about code, a solid wood slab (not rated) is not very much more at all (geesh, what are we talking about, $30 more) At LEAST do that!
And, as the other poster pointed out, we now have the code where they have to have the spring hinges. I've never heard it has to be metal.
I wouldn't even cosider a hollow door. Another thing to think about is security--someone could just put their foot through one of those hollow doors. I would want to have a deadbolt on anything going outside, which would be kinda silly on a hollow door.
-- John Ross
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One thing that bugs me about this whole thing is just how tough it is to get an accurate ruling on what I HAVE to do. I understand what you all think I SHOULD do and I'm not doubting you I understand your reasons. But for some reason I am having a difficult time finding the legal answer. I did fire off a question to my county inspectors, seeing how I don't live in city limits, and I'm sure I'll hear back from them in about 20 years. When and IF I hear a response from them I'll know the best way to approach new construction and DIY projects. But wouldn't you think more people would obey codes and regulations if it was simple to find those codes and regulations?
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Since you replied so strongly to my post I thought I'd post a follow on.
After writing to the county about the possibility of having to obtain a permit and what the specifics are on the door requirements - their answer was short, terse, and unambiguous - "No code requirement, no permit required."
That doesn't mean I don't understand where you are coming from and I'm not disregarding your suggestion.
I have to replace all the interior doors in my house as they all have deep scratches in them and the laminate front is falling apart, so I count this as a lesson in how to hang a door.
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For the windows, take off the interior molding. You should then be able to see and accurately measure the existing frame, and know how big a replacement frame will fit. You are likely to find the opening is larger than the existing frame, with shims to fit it. If you get a bigger replacement that will fit in the opening, you will have to cut a bigger opening in the siding, and that's more work than most people want to do.
Eigenvector wrote:

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Okay, I can do that. I'm pretty sure the new measurements will come out 72x36 so it does sound like I was measuring them wrong.

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