Mean Time Between Failure for Well Pump Wiring

About 4 years ago, I had my well pump and wiring replaced. The water went out recently and when the plumber pulled the pump from 300' well, it tested for broken wire. Upon inspection, the black and green ground wires were both broken, though in different places within 15 feet of the pump. Plumber explained that this is a normal occurrence and wiring can break at anytime without regard to when it was installed. He further explained that the bucking action of the pump rubs the wire against the side or otherwise strains the wire. Problem is...I spoke with several different well users, all of whom claim broken wires are few and far between. When I tried to discuss the matter with another level of manager, I received a similar song and dance. It happens all the time...expect it as a routine cost of owning a well.
I also asked about quality of wire and the protective casing around the wire and was told it was all standard and there was no difference or better quality product to reduce chance of problem in the future. My own experience growing up on a well and prior experience of 7 years in my current home tell me that all of these answers may be self serving on the part of the plumber. If the situation is as described then plumbers must spend 90% of their time replacing broken wire for well pumps...afterall, it's routine and expected although unpredictable since according to the plumber the wire can break within 6 months or a couple years but almost certainly before pump failure.
I would appreciate feedback feedback on this topic from well owners and trade professionals. I am not looking forward to shelling out $725 every 4 years to remedy this problem. I also note that plumbers in our area are moving to fixed priced and advertising that it saves customers money. In this case they put in 105 minutes with one plumber and one helper....cost of wire was not itemized but it seems like it would have cost less at an hourly rate of 90/hr for plumber and 40/hr for helper?
Thanks in advance.
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gymtime wrote: ...snip story of woe of failed well wire after four years...
The "bucking" shouldn't occur because there should be a snubber to prevent it.
There is wire specifically marked for well usage -- are they using it?
Was the wire changed out when the previous pump was changed?
I can't think of last time had a wire break itself but the previous before the last pump had last 15 years or a little over. Traded it out on general principles when replaced the pump.
Don't know about costs -- depends greatly on how deep the well, locality, etc. Would be roughly that here to pull it from 240 ft.
--
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On Tue, 12 Jun 2007 16:26:14 -0700, gymtime wrote:

Bullcrap. I've pulled my well twice in 30 years. Once the rope broke and allowed the cable to lay across the top of the casing and wear then fry. The second the whole pump needed changed so everything was replaced, tubing and all. Never had the wires break from startup torque of the pump.
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I've never heard of that before. Normally the wire is taped to the pipe at regular intervals and plastic collars keep the pipe and wire from contacting the casing.
Perhaps the wire ended up under tension after the pump/pipe assembly was lowered into the well.
Of course, anything can break at any time, but the B.S. answer from the plumber is suspect. A perfectly acceptable honest answer is "I can't explain why it's broke but you still have to pay me to fix it".
-rev
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Have him reinstall it with a 300 foot long pvc pipe as a sleeve. It won't break again. I have a moron well guy like yours who told me the same BS. I didn't know better. When I finally dumped him, the new guy fixed it permanently with the pvc sleave. In fact he used the old water pipe as the sleave and put in a fresh pipe to carry the water.

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