mcculloch electric chainsaw leaks

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I inherited this chainsaw, and it looks and works pretty good for its size. But the chain-oil slowly oozes (leaks) out when the saw just sits unused on the table. I have disassembled it, and see nothing out of ordinary. But I know little of how chainsaws really work. The Sears parts page shows little to help me.
Google searches indicate that this problem is common. Some people say that when they remove the tank-cap to relieve pressure in the tank, the leakage stops - and so they do that after using the saw before storing the saw away. Did not work for me. My tank emptied overnight with the cap removed.
So I ask - anyone suggest something that I do to stop the leak when saw sits unused - except emptying the oil tank that is.
Thanks
The Apeman
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Have you tried storing it on one side or the other? Using the correct oil, ie not one that is too thin?
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On Sat, 5 Jan 2013 06:15:40 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

No, and no.
I didn't realize that chain oil viscosity varied.
I'll try both suggestions. Failing that, I'll do what Jim suggested.
Thanks both
The Apeman
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Might want to check what the manufacturer recommends. Remington's electrics say to use 30 weight engine oil-- *not* chain oil.

I don't know if you got the same picture I had in my mind when I sent my post. I hang them *chain down*- so the oil, if it runs out, lubes the chain on its way to the bucket.

It is refreshing to find an on topic post these days.<g>
Jim
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That is interisting. I thought the cain oil should be bio-degradable and not regular engine oil. Not so much as for the chain, but for the enviroment. If the EPA saw that, I bet it would change.
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On 1/5/2013 10:55 AM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

I used a Stihl 039 for many years, cutting about 40-50 bush cords plus all the limbs.
Biggest mistake I made was using used Engine Oil for the bar oil.
Cost me about $80 to replace the oil pump alone.
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I've heard that used crankcase oil is far worse than 10w30 new stuff.
For sure, bar and chain oil made for the purpose.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
wrote in message
I used a Stihl 039 for many years, cutting about 40-50 bush cords plus all the limbs.
Biggest mistake I made was using used Engine Oil for the bar oil.
Cost me about $80 to replace the oil pump alone.
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On Sat, 5 Jan 2013 06:15:40 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

Pursuant to your suggestions, I re-filled the tank and then laid the saw on its side with the chain side up, knowing the up-side then would be where the tank's intended outlet would be. After some eight hours, I see no leakage at all. Tank is still full.
I am not surprised though because although I didn't tell you before, I had earlier dismantled the saw to see how it operates, and to see if the plastic tank has any leaks in and of itself. It did not. And so, I knew that today, no oil should come out of the tank with the outlet pointing upward.
I guess I now need to buy a different oil, or try simply storing the saw with the chain upward, and with the tank emptied of course.
Thanks
The Apeman
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wrote:

Every saw could be differant. There was a statement in the Remington saw under the oil to drain it so it would not leak. Guess that leaking is normal for that saw. Could be that yours is the same.
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On Sat, 5 Jan 2013 16:35:59 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

Thanks
Apeman
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wrote:

I don't have the manual, but will try google for one. I may even have the manual for my similar Poulan.

Now that sounds like a winner.

How about that!
Thanks
The Apeman
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On Sat, 5 Jan 2013 15:36:32 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

Hmmm
I have an old Gas Stihl that never failed, and that I used to down and cup up many a firewood tree. It sits on a shelf now. Remind me to be careful choosing its oil. And its gas so I am told. That is, if I ever use it again. I am a decrepit senior now.
Cya
The Apeman
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On 1/5/2013 4:32 PM, Ape wrote:

I made a mistake in my post. It was 40-50 bush cords a year, not overall. Must have used that saw 5 or 6 years.
I was always accurate about the gas mixture. was either 40-1 or 32-1, can't remember but If i ever adjusted that carb once I have forgotten. Prolly adjusted the idle all of 5 times.
But really careless about bar oil.
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On 1/5/2013 3:32 PM, Ape wrote:

A Silverback, eh? ^_^
TDD
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On Saturday, January 5, 2013 at 11:55:00 PM UTC+8, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Regular engine oil IS bio-degradable; bacteria that live in the soil just love it.
But many environmentalists don't want people to know that because it would ruin their credibility. Other environmentalists simply don't know about it, or if they've been told, they choose not to believe it.
Do a Google search for "Cold Seeps" to learn more about naturally-occurring bacteria that thrive on crude oil.
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Thanks for the advise, I'll try 30 weight oil and hang w/ chain down.
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for oil to get out air MUST be able to get in.
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On Sat, 05 Jan 2013 13:32:55 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I will
The Apeman
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Same here, with my Homelite. I pack a bunch of restaurant paper napkins into the carry case, under the saw.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I inherited this chainsaw, and it looks and works pretty good for its size. But the chain-oil slowly oozes (leaks) out when the saw just sits unused on the table. I have disassembled it, and see nothing out of ordinary. But I know little of how chainsaws really work. The Sears parts page shows little to help me.
Google searches indicate that this problem is common. Some people say that when they remove the tank-cap to relieve pressure in the tank, the leakage stops - and so they do that after using the saw before storing the saw away. Did not work for me. My tank emptied overnight with the cap removed.
So I ask - anyone suggest something that I do to stop the leak when saw sits unused - except emptying the oil tank that is.
Thanks
The Apeman
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Same place as your missing green sock.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
My electrics are Remington and they do the same thing. I hang them over a bucket. Not worth the effort to figure out where a bit of oil goes between uses.
Jim
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