Maytag washer tub leak/repair

I have a Maytag stackable unit and the washer leaks. I took the front off the washer and the leak is clearly at the bottom of the tub. According to the model number LSE7806ACE, a repair website suggests three items to remedy what seems to be a seal. One, of course is the seal (kit) and a bearing kit and a spanner tool to get the tub nut off and on. The parts are about 175.00 including shipping. The washer/dryer unit is about 8 years old and this is the first issue I've encountered. A new stackable unit is about 900.00.
Question? How does one go about changing the seal and bearings? From inside the carcass? From inside the tub? From the back, the front...? I'm pretty mechanical but have no idea where to start dismantling this beast.
Any input on old washing machine econony vs new washer? Is this seal a death knell or a precursor to more crap soon down the road? Thanks Perry
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I had my washer leak last year and I believed it was coming from the seal. Rather than take a chance and go through the trouble repairing it and possible still have the leak there, I just bought another washer, $350. I did not even get an extended warranty, figured was not worth it. The way they make washers today is basically when it goes bad just throw them out and get a new one. Mine was about 7 years old. In your case is different. You have a stackable. I don't think changing a seal( if that is the problem) is something for the average DIY person to do.
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Ok...let's assume that I'm a bit more talented than the average bloke, mechanically. And then back to my original question..as to how to approach this repair? I appreciate your input. Thanks. Anyone else? Perry
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Happy to report that a local supply had all the necessary parts and tool...I google and found a step by step set of instructions...the first part of the task was to remove the first locknut under agitator..it was so corroded that the wrench approach, after about 45 minutes of banging was futile..I cut the nut off with a dremel. Everything else was matter of fact. I can certainly understand how that job would rack up a lot of labor cost...someone knowledgeable would do it faster, but still, there's lots of laborious steps...awkward, heavy parts. I don't know exactly how much I saved myself, but it took me about 2 hours, but I went slow and double checked each step. One final instruction was to run the washing machine through a spin cyle for a few minutes before you attempt a wash cycle... While inside the carcass of the washer, inspected hoses, clamps, connections, etc. and all looked ok. Most women wouldn't tackle something like this, but if I had to wait on my husband, I'd be still waiting....I'm glad it's done and I'm back to being the washer woman. Perry
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