Math issues - Amount of water in a 1½ inch pipe

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I'm 59, so... I could actually retire now, or retire later and have a lot more money to spend. ;-)

I'm an engineer and use both equally. I have a neat little applet on my desktop to do the weird conversions, when necessary (ConvCalc).

When I was in college, slide rules were the rule. ;-) Powers of 10 mattered, since I could do most calculations in my head, with just a few flicks of the fingers. Since I switched to calculators 38 years ago, that skill has atrophied to where I'm pretty much dependent on them; entering a few more numbers doesn't slow me down. ...and I'm not old enough that remembering them is a problem. ;-)
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Used slide rules in high school, or perhaps in undergrad a bit. Calculators were becoming the norm back in the middle 60's. My computer is aiding me in forgeting simple math in my head ...
--
Best regards
Han
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Calculators didn't replace slide rules until the mid-70s (until they got small enough to carry). I bought my first (HP-45) in '73, my senior year.
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On 11/9/2011 6:36 AM, Han wrote: ...

How so much? What's pi in metric units? :)
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Is the OP CERTAIN, its a bad pump? or has the water table fallen? or a myriad of other possibilties, like a cracked or rusted out main pipe......
best wishes on your project but plan in advance for gotchas.....
like the well collapsed on the pump
have the financing inorder for a entire new well
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I believe this would be a metric pi:
http://www.venere.com/blog/images/british-pie.jpg
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wrote:

Certainly not! That would be an imperial pie.
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lol
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Best regards
Han
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On Nov 9, 6:44 am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

LOL...
Call someone who knows what they are doing to help you and who has the right equipment to actually grip the pipe while pulling it up...
You are going to have to cut the pipe every 10-15 feet depending on how high you can lift the bucket on your tractor/loader and it is going to break your balls to attempt doing this "project" yourself...
However, it is your well and your tractor/loader, if you want to screw up both of them that is up to you but when you lose your grip on the pipe as you try to redneck this job it will be really expensive to have a well company come in and extract the broken piece from the bottom of the well after you drop it down there than it would have been for them to pull the pipe and pump and replace it all for you...
~~ Evan
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On Wed, 9 Nov 2011 04:46:31 -0800 (PST), Evan

I already called a well company. When I heard their estimate of $4000 (which will likely be $5000 or more), I'll do it myself. I'm not worried about the tractor loader. It wont break, it just wont lift if the weight it too much. I know I have to cut the pipe, that's what my sawsall is for. I intend to rent a clamping device that prevents the pipe from dropping in the well. That's the tool I have not yet found.
That well company's estimate is charging $1200 for a pump I can get for around $600, and $900 for the wire, which I can get for $470 (if I need it), and they said they will NOT reuse wire. On top of that, they said that to get their truck in there, I will have to cut down several trees. I dont have to cut any trees to get my tractor in there, other then taking off a few small low branches. But that's because they refuse to come in from the rear but driving thru some pasture and crop field. They insist they have to come in from the driveway. My tractor can come in from anywhere.
I'd be happy to pay someone to just come and pull the pipes. But not when they're trying to rob me at gunpoint. Even a friend of mine who is an electrician and has worked with that company, told me to avoid them. The problem is that they are a monoply around here. There was a really old man who used to do it, and was fair. In fact he's the guy who installed the current pump 40 years ago. His son still has all the equipment but dont want to do the work. I already asked him about renting the machinery, but he said no. And why the hell would I be stupid enough to spend $900 to replace the wire, when it's likely still good. But that's just a sign of the times, waste waste waste... (because companies like that dont want to get their hands dirty using something that;s not brand new and wrapped in plastic).
The way I see it, these days you either DIY, or you get robbed. I just put rear brakes on my pickup. Cost $94. That was new shoes, drums turned, new spring kit, and both rear emergency brake cables (which were stuck, and probably caused the excessive wear). I know a guy who just had his rear shoes replaced by a dealer. Cost $672, and they only changed the shoes, no springs or e-brake cables. Drums might have been turned or maybe not. The only parts listed was the shoes on his bill, and they were almost $100, the rest was labor.
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On Nov 9, 8:40 am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

I agree this isn't rocket science and given that you have a tractor to do the pulling, well within the capability of the DIY job. And as you've figured out, you'll save a lot of money. As long as you use some common sense, it should go fine. Key thing as you;ve already figured out is to make sure you don't lose the pipe down the well. I can think of several ways to do that.
Some folks in this group are alarmists and for some reason just think that many jobs like this require a professional, probably because they don't have much experience in fixing things themselves.
 I

Again, I agree. You can save a huge amount doing routine brake work yourself. But some would tell you you're gonna die if you dare touch them.
One of the major brake/auto repair chains is running a radio ad here in the NYC area. The ad says to come to them for your brake work, tell them how much you want to spend, and they will work within your budget to do the work. That one strikes me as particularly odd. Like if a guy comes in and says he only has $125 to spend on a job that should cost $400, what are they gonna do on a job where safety is at risk? I guess they won't compromise safety, but there are other half-assed ways to save money too that will come back to cost you more in the end.
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On 11/9/2011 8:40 AM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Wow! I had mine replaced not long ago (about 600' down, new 1.5hp goulds pump, old wire and pipe) for a grand total of $1324.66 including tax.
I missed the beginning of the thread, what size is your pump?
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On Wed, 09 Nov 2011 15:24:10 -0500, Tony Miklos

That sounds much more reasonable. I just got a second estimate for $2800. Better than the first one, but still seems quite high. The pump is a 1 HP, down approx 300ft. This new estimate is everything new, pump, pipe, fittings, control box. They said they would try to save some of the old pipe if possible, and can put plastic pipe below the good steel pipe, but it's hard to know what is needed. They insist the wire be replaced because the new code requires 4 wires now (a ground wire is added).
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On 11/9/2011 6:55 PM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

I must admit my well guys work amazingly cheap so I'd add about $400 to my price for a more realistic comparison. Most likely anyone who drills wells will be higher priced, repairs are stuff they don't like to be bothered with.
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On Wed, 09 Nov 2011 19:51:42 -0500, Tony Miklos

Even if I add $400, your price would be about $1000 less than what I'm being quoted, and you have double the depth of mine and a 1.5hp pump v/s my 1 hp. However, you reused your pipe and wire. My estimate is for both of them new. I asked them if they could reuse the pipe, if they would. They said they would, or maybe just the clean stuff above the water line. As far as the wire, by code, they must install grounded wire now, but said that if my wire was in real good shape, they would reuse it, but if there is even one wear spot, they wont. (I'm sure they'll find something wrong with it).
What surprises me, is that they need to install #10 wire. I'm almost sure what I have is #12, and I know for sure that the wire feeding the control box from the breaker is a #12. It's a 20A dual 220v breaker. 20A is #12 wire.
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On Wed, 09 Nov 2011 19:51:42 -0500, Tony Miklos

Damn, I need one of these.......
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hB_jzeU1Xgw
One man pulls 480 feet of pipe in about 10 minutes with this machine. Amazing!
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On 11/9/2011 5:44 AM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

...
<http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/ansi-steel-pipes-d_305.html
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On 11/9/2011 5:44 AM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote: ...

As others said, it'll add another 200 lb+/-
But, you're forgetting about what the breakout force will be; the snubbers and that it's been sitting in place for however long means the initial friction forces will likely be close to that of half the weight or perhaps even more. I don't think you have any chance w/ your front loader in a direct lift; not to mention the hassle of trying to deal with such a rube goldberg setup.
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I was just informed that the drop pipe is actually inch and a quarter, not inch and a half. That takes off a few pounbut I know the initial breaking loose the pitless and all that is gonna be tough.
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snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

I'd worry more about what you're gonna do when the pipe breaks.
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