matching old plaster texture

My house has was built 1928. The texture on the walls is like a flattened popcorn effect.
Does anyone know any supply house who makes tools to texture, or kits?
The wall is gypsum. I've tried the brushs the sponges and I'm not getting close. I'll probably have to just figure out a method - I think I have to sand the points down ( I'm using plaster of paris) after it hardens. The only problem is I can't get the markations to be broad enough.
(FYI) You cannot get a plaster guy around here to show up!
--
Barry
Glen Head NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Henny bogan wrote:

Are you doing entire walls or just patching?
http://alsnetbiz.com/homeimprovement/texture.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
just patching and filling cracks. the cracks are easy it's copying the texture that drives me nuts.
BF

--
Barry
Glen Head NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote: Norminn:
Your link is perfect. Thanks! I've been researching for days.
Rock

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Get a paint roller with a deep nap sleeve -- the deepest available -- and a bucket of pre-mixed dry wall mud (joint cement). Roll the mud on slowly just like you would roll on paint. The deep nap of the roller and the thick mud will leave the texture you want.
You might have to thin down the mud a little with water to get the right application, and you will have to practice a bit to get the exact texture you want. Try it out on a small area first (or on a board or box) and see what you get. If you make a mistake you can scrape it off while wet with a trowel or putty knife.
If the texture you leave on the wall is too "peaked" for example, you can knock it down with a clean, damp roller after the texture sets up a little. Make sure you roll it on smoothly, as ridges and odd swirls will show. You have to be a bit artistic and pay attention to matching the existing texture.
After the texture dries, paint the whole wall the color you want. I did this on several areas in my 1921 house when we were renovating it and it worked fine. I never found it necessary to add sand to the paint or texture. My experience with my own house and homes of neighbors from the '20s is that sand was not used -- that was a later method and yields a different effect. A crappier effect IMHO.
You can also buy more expensive premixed texture paint the color you want.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I think I would try to make a model of the original pattern. Get a board perhaps 8 or ten inches square. Put a handle on one side. On the other side, put some lath or screening to hold plaster. Tape a piece of saran wrap or the like on a good patterned section of the wall. Apply plaster to the lath side of your tool, smooth it, and press it firmly against the saran wrap while still wet. You should be able to pick up the pattern that way. Let your tool set. Then use it to pattern your repaired areas. I would wrap some saran wrap around the tool, to prevent it adhering or drawing water from the repaired areas.
I hope you are using plaster of paris just for experimenting. It isn't strong enough for walls. A good repair consists of a base layer of perlited gypsum (also known as brown coat) for strength, and one or two thin coats of finishing plaster, for smoothness. I'm not sure places like Home Depot carry these; everything I saw there was oriented to plasterboard.
Henny bogan wrote:

--
SPAMBLOCK NOTICE! To reply to me, delete the h from apkh.net, if it is
there.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The kit at home depot has the stuff you add to the paint and then you just apply it with a deep napped roller and follow up with an empty roller to smash the peaks down. (And then while it is still wet, you scrape it off and do it again and again and again...)
Then you paint it the same color and move on with your life.
PJ
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Try putting some of the plaster in a plastic bag and snip off the corner. Use this like a pastry bag to squeeze out blobs and streaks a little narrower than you want them to be. after it sets for about 10 minutes hold a trowel at an angle and knock down the high spots. This will streak the plaster similar to the original look.
Sometimes you need to widen the area of your texturing into the old plaster so your artwork kind of blends with the original.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I learned this one from an old painter.
Patch the walls/cracks/etc. Blend in the filler to a slick, smooth finish. Use plaster or drywall compound - I prefer thermal setting drywall compound for repairing cracks. Trowel to acceptable finish or sand out if required.
When trying to match old sand finish plaster or adding new gyp walls that touch or need to blend with old sand finish plaster walls, use cornmeal as texture.
His recipe was one cup of cornmeal to a gallon of paint. I have used this quite a few times. You need to work at keeping the cornmeal in suspension, you need to use a full- wet roller nap, you need to work a bit at blending the rolled on texture so it does not have blobs or runs of texture. As always, try on some scrap.
It is inexpensive to try and may give you just the effect you seek.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.