Making new brass look old

Hello. My house was built in 1924 and has many brass switch and outlet plates. I need to put a brass plate on a new outlet. Polished brass just looks too new. Antique finished brass doesn't look old at all. Is there a way to make a new brass plate look like its been in use for 80 years??
Any thoughts are greatly appreciated.
Thanks.
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If you like I could send my little kids over there for a few days....that would do it.
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I would polish the old stuff to make it look new.
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I like the old look...
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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Bury it in the flowerbed for a while.
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The new polished brass has a coating of something on it to keep it from tarnishing for years. I suppose if you used an abrasive polish or had a polishing wheel with rouge, you may be able to remove the coating and the plate should tarnish naturally like the originals do.
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dave writes:

You don't need sucker-priced patina kits. Just pack it in slightly dampened Miracle Gro for a few weeks. Rinse well, dry, buff and apply a clear spray lacquer.
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Richard J Kinch wrote:

Remove any lacquer from the plate with paste paint stripper, then wipe it with "Liver of Sulfur" solution which you should be able to get at an artist supply store.
http://www.dickblick.com/zz605/05 /
Works for me....
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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On Mon, 17 Jul 2006 18:13:59 -0400, with neither quill nor qualm, Jeff

Strip it, dry it, pee on it (OK, use vinegar) for a lovely green tinge of corrosion, then liver it to further darken it.
Respray with lacquer if wanted.

Ayup.
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Picasso would have kids pee on new statues to age them, worth a try.

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I tell my wife that I'm making a Picasso when I take a leak in the snow while at the cabin. She's not impressed.
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dave wrote:

I would use paint remover to take off the clear lacquer protective coat. It will tarnish in no time. If brass plate, you may want to coat it again so the brass doesn't pit - new brass plate is usually very thin. If you are impatient, put it in a dish with a boiled egg :o)
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dave wrote:

Ammonia:
http://www.whitechapel-ltd.com/tech/antique_brass.shtml
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