Making a very hot cup of coffee

Page 2 of 2  
On Thu, 13 Jan 2005 19:51:54 +0000 (UTC), Drew V

I use a finer grind because I like my coffee a bit chewy.:) Want flavor? Throw in a vanilla bean!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Drew V wrote:

I have a french coffee press that I bought at a rummage sale. I have a 1500W electric kettle that I recently bought at Wal-mart for $30. (I wish I had a 3000W British electric kettle, but they are hard to come by in North America, and I'd have to run a new circuit for it.) Anyway, the electric kettle and french press combination makes a litre of scalding hot coffee very quickly.
Best regards, Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, usually makes things worse. Hot water will not set off the sensors in some units.
How cold is the cold coffee? If it is not heating properly, it may be a defective unit. Take a temperature reading to see what you really have. Most coffee brewers say something in the 180 range is the "best" temperature, but it will drop more in the carafe. If you fall far below, take it back. If it is still not as hot as you like, perhaps no drip brewer will do the job for your preferences.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hopefully, you've not been discouraged by all the non-answers to your question and you're still here. Assuming that to be true, I can make a couple of broad generalizations.
First, feel free to 'warm up' your carafe with anything you want. 190F should be fine. That should help.
Secondly, with most coffeemakers (I'm assuming that this holds true for yours), the physics of pumping the water from the reservoir to the coffee relies on heat. Typically, the water is heated in a small chamber (for lack of a better word) until it reaches a sufficient temperature that forces it up a tube/pipe and into the coffee filter. This is similar to the process that causes the water in a percolator to rise. In your drip maker, cold water enters the chamber as hot water is forced out. This continues until the reservoir is empty, at which point, it shuts off. If you fill the reservoir with hot water, it's likely that the process will occur faster, but the resulting temperature will be the same, since you wouldn't be changing the physics involved.
Given that the process appears to be working, perhaps it's a matter of personal preference. Maybe you just like your coffee hotter than other people do. I would, nevertheless, persue this with the manufacturer, though. There's likely some information that defies generalizations like these.
snipped-for-privacy@Seldin.net says...

--
-Mike

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/14/2005 9:20 AM US(ET), Mike Hartigan took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

I would not fill the reservoir with hot water unless it was designed to be able to handle hot water, which would be stated in the user documentation. If the reservoir parts are plastic (as most are) and are not heat resistant, then the container, or any valves, gaskets, tubing, or other parts between the reservoir and heater element could prematurely warp, loosen, or fail.

--
Bill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Mike,
One thing that continues to amaze me about newsgroups, is that if I ask a question, I am obviously, looking for an answer, However, the concept that I have, is "if you don't know the answer" then you don't "need to reply", otherwise, any helpful information is very appreciated. In addition, some readers (I don't think, look at the entire message", because for myself, being an avid newsgroup reader, I have learned to put in as much "info on what I have done" before asking the newsgroup questions.
In addition, for some reason, there are sometimes a few people, who respond in a nasty way. I don't know why.
Anyway, your info, and that of the other very nice people on this group, got me thinking.
So here is what I did. I created an experiment. I have bought coffee beans to grind and make coffee. However, since I was just looking for ways to make the temperature to be as hot as possible, I created a test.
Using only water, here are the tests that validated your response.
1st Experiment:
I put cold water into the Coffee Resovoir and just ran the Coffee maker without coffee. Water tasted cold.
2nd Experiment:
I then put cold water into the Coffee Resovoir and rinsed out Caraffe with 190 degree hot water. Water tasted passibly hot.
3rd Experiment:
I put cold water into the Coffee Resovoir and just ran the Coffee maker without coffee. I put 190 degree water into Caraffe and let stand for 3 minutes. Water tasted somewhat hotter.
4th Experiement:
I then put hot water from faucet into Coffee Resovoir and just ran the Coffee maker without coffee. I put 190 degree water into Caraffe and let stand for 3 minutes. Water tasted somewhat hotter.
Note: on th Experiment with placing hot water into Coffee Resovoir, Coffe maker, finished cycle much quicker, like you stated.
5th Experiment:
I put cold water into the Coffee Resovoir and just ran the Coffee maker without coffee. I put 190 degree water into Caraffe and let stand for 20 minutes. Water tasted a little colder.
So in conclusion, I will use Cold water to put in Coffee Resovoir and use 190 degree water into Carafe and let stand a few minutes.
I would like to thank all of the people who responsed with feedback.
Much appreciated.
Lawrence M. Seldin, CMC, CPC Author of POWER TIPS FOR THE APPLE NEWTON and INTRODUCTION TO CSP Author of RECRUITSOURCE PEOPLESOFT EXAM and RECRUITSOURCE SAP/R3 EXAM
NOTE: To send me an email, remove TAKEOUT from my email address: snipped-for-privacy@seldin.net
NOTE: My web home page: www.seldin.net
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 17 Jan 2005 12:47:58 -0500, "Lawrence M. Seldin, CMC, CPC"

cup of coffee.
I have a thermos style coffee maker sitting at the back of my sink cup board. Once you go French you never go drip again.:)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I dont know why you are playing with your coffee maker, it obviously is broke-not heating the water. Kinda obvious, yes.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have the same pot, mine makes a great cup of coffee with the freshly ground beans.
You can pour 212F boiling water into the carafe to preheat it, that works great... so your 190F water should be just fine too. Make sure you give the hot water a minute or two to really heat up that carafe before you pour it out.
I would not use hot water to brew the coffee, I would use nothing but cold in the tank..the secret with this machine is to really preheat that carafe..
--

Mikey S.
http://www.mike721.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.