Making a rounded-edge arch

Just finished a remodeling job where I took out an existing closet doorway and made a large opening with an arched top. Straight sides with a circular arc on top. I used "bullnose" corner bead to make a rounded edge all the way around.
The sides were easy: I used the metal/paper bead, which has two pieces of paper (same as drywall tape) bonded to a thin galvanized curve. I first tried to use this material for the arch, cutting segments into the bullnose with tinsnips and then bending the bead to the arch. I *almost* managed to make this work, until I noticed I'd nailed it up wrong so that there was no way to hide the nails in the final result. So I ended up tearing it out and replacing it with the flexible plastic stuff.
Using that stuff was a challenge, too: while it went up nicely, when I applied a coat of mud over it, it left telltale "railroad tracks" where the slices were, which looked pretty near impossible to get rid of. So I ended up mudding the bead and laying a couple of layers of tape over it, which I first soaked to make more flexible. This ended up working OK, though I had to work over the tape pretty well to get out the wrinkles, then cover it with another layer of mud to cover the wrinkles I couldn't get rid of.
There's got to be an easier way. Anyone know how to make such a rounded-edge arch?
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David Nebenzahl wrote:

The old way, with a wood bead? Get some trim with proper profile and a flat wing for the inside the arch part, steam it, and nail in place to arch framing. Rock up to it, and mud it in flush. TOH showed an old-time plasterer doing a rounded edge inside a dormer, actually pulling plaster to get a finish contour.
-- aem sends...
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On 10/19/2008 7:40 PM aemeijers spake thus:

>

While that might be a more traditional and "proper" way of doing, it, it certainly doesn't sound easy. If I were a professional plasterer, I would certainly try it that way.
Just steaming the trim would require a lot of fabrication on my part, or getting equipment I don't have and don't even know where to get.
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-snip-

While I think I'd go with the way you just did it, making a steamer for trim only need involve a length of PVC, a cap, a teakettle, and a hotplate.
Jim
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Sure..Use the plastic stuff and staple it on with a staplegun.Mud the first coat as normal.After dry sand the bead. Coat the railroad tracks as you call them by going the opposite way to fill them in.You may need a Corner pro curved rubber knife to do the arch part if it is tight curve..Do this several times sanding between coats.After they are filled in coat the entire archway a couple more times as normal , sanding between coats. PITA I know but that's bullnose...LOL...I HATE IT..LOL....Good Luck...
PS Easysand 45 or 90 Setting Type Joint compoundworks good for mutiple coats in one day.....
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