Making a blizzard survival kit

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Newsgroups: rec.autos.driving,alt.home.repair,alt.autos Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2008 2:14 AM Subject: How to make a "Blizzard Survival Kit" for Drivers
Making a "Blizzard Survival Kit" !!!
You're driving down the road in a winter blizzard. The thermometer reads minus 25, the winds are blowing 50 mph and you cant see ten feet ahead of you. Suddenly your car slides off the road into a ditch and a deep snow bank. The snow is packed under the car so the wheels do nothing but spin. You don't have a snow shovel to dig the car out, or a safety flare to alert the authorities. Your cellphone battery is dead, and you're freezing cold. You know you will soon die from exposure and freaze to deeth. What are you going to do as you kneel on the front seat of your car praying to the plastic Jesus hanging on your rear-view mirror, while cussing out God because of the tragedy you are experiencing.
But, you know you're prepared for an emergency such as this, because you were smart enough to create a "Blizzard Survival Kit" long before this disaster occurred, and every good driver knows that sooner or later this disaster WILL happen.
You open the glove compartment and find a small carboard box. Inside the box is an ice pick, book of matches, some cotton, a nail, some bubblegum, and a candle.
Here's how to use your "Blizzard Survival Kit".
1. Empty contents of the box.
2. Puncture the bottom of the cardboard box with the nail and stick the nail into the bottom of the candle so the candle stands upright inside the box.
3. Place the cotton around the base of the candle inside the box.
4. Light the candle inside the car so the wind does not blow out the match.
5. Take the ice pick and puncture a small hole in your cars gas tank.
6. Carry the "Blizzard Survival Kit" with burning candle to the rear of the car and place the box near (but not too close) to the leak in the gas tank which you made with your ice pick.
7. Grab your plastic Jesus and get at least 500 feet away from the car. This will be the toughest time because you will be freezing cold and all you can do is wait, while praying to your plastic Jesus for a place in his plastic heaven, if you should die.
8. Several minutes pass, and you'll suddenly notice the cotton ignite in the box, setting the box on fire, which will then ignite the dripping gasoline. Seconds later the entire contents of your gas tank will ignite, explode, and begin to burn with a very hot fire. This is when you can walk closer to the fire and warm up. The flames and thick black smoke will alert the authorities that you are there, and they will come to assist. Best yet, the heat from the gasoline fire will melt the snow around your car so you can easily drive away after you insert the bubblegum in the hole in the gas tank, and refill the tank with gas.
Today is a great day to create your very own "Blizzard Survival Kit". Don't wait until disaster strikes, and it's too late when the authorities find your frozen dead body on the side of the road.
This road safety tip is provided as a courtesy by Mike's Auto Salvage of Sarasota, Florida.
Mike
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On Tuesday, March 3, 2015 at 9:23:18 AM UTC-5, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I would burn the spare tire to attract attention instead of setting the whole car on fire.
Paul
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On 3/3/2015 10:23 AM, Pavel314 wrote:

Many cars today no longer come with a spare tire, just a can of Fix-a-flat type stuff. You have to take a wheel off.
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On 3/3/2015 12:22 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

As of August 2014 these cars did not come with a spare tire according to Consumer Reports:
Acura RLX Audi TT Buick LaCrosse Cadillac CTS Cadillac SRX Cadillac XTS Chevrolet Camaro Chevrolet Malibu Chevrolet Spark Chevrolet Volt Dodge Caliber Dodge Dart Fiat 500 Ford C-Max Ford Focus Ford Fusion Ford Mustang Honda Accord Hyundai Accent Hyundai Elantra Hyundai Sonata Hyundai Veloster Infiniti G Kia Forte Kia Rio Kia Soul Land Rover Range Rover Sport Mazda MX-5 Miata Mitsubishi i-MiEV Nissan Leaf Porsche 911 Porsche Boxster Porsche Panamera Scion iQ Smart ForTwo Toyota Prius Volvo C70 Volvo S60 ...and probably some not listed.
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On 3/3/2015 2:26 PM, IGot2P wrote:

My 2013 Sonata has a spare but would not be surprised it it is eliminated. I've not driven on a spare for over 30 years until last December when I had a gash in the sidewall. I'd have been screwed without one. The free Roadside Assistance was nice to on a cold night.
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On Tuesday, March 3, 2015 at 2:26:59 PM UTC-5, IGot2P wrote:

I have a 2013 Fusion and it does have a spare tire; guess 2014 was a watershed model year. I saw something a while back about non-pneumatic tires for cars, which might be the next new thing.
Paul
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On 03/03/2015 09:23 AM, Pavel314 wrote:

Mike's

When I was a kid I read a story about a business man driving home in a snowstorm and eventually the snow was so deep and the visibility was so poor he could drive no more.
He had a warm jacket so would not freeze and he had plenty of treats that he was bringing for his family so he knew he'd be OK.
He really tried not to eat the treats but the hunger got to him and he needed the energy to keep himself warm...so by morning he had eaten everything.
The sun was now out and the snow had stopped...so he got out of the car to get his bearing.
He was parked in front of his own house!
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Heard basically the same story, but the guy didn't stay in his car. He got out and tried to walk home. In the morning his wife found the car parked less than 10 feet from the house - next day they found his body half a mile away in a snow drift, frozen solid.
STAY IN THE CAR - at least untill the storm stops.
Part of the blizzard kit should be a telescopic handle like they sell for paint rollers, and a reflective flag to tie to it with your name and licence number on it to identify where the car is buried in the snow drift, and a box of candles for heat. -a good blanket or sleeping bag too. It's all in the back of my pickup - within reach of the sliding window between the cab and the box - also in the trunk of the Taurus - where it can be reached through the back seat pass-through to the trunk.
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On 03/03/2015 08:13 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The story I related was fictional
but people do freeze to death if they get out and walk.
There was one news item I read recently about a woman who froze solid but miraculously survived after they thawed her out,

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G5E394eoU54

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On Wednesday, March 4, 2015 at 3:35:52 AM UTC-6, philo wrote:

Of course the "frozen solid" is an exaggeration...her core temperature was in the 70's. Still, the "mammalian effect" is astounding!
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On Tue, 03 Mar 2015 21:13:34 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

They always say to STAY IN THE CAR, which makes sense if the car still runs. But if it wont run, you can freeze inside the car too.
Years ago, my fuel pump quit working. I was about 3 miles from home, out in the country on a gravel road around midnight. Cellphones were rare back then and I did not have one. It was very cold and windy and there was a lot of blowing snow. But with no fuel pump, the engine was not going to start. I know no one would likely drive by there till 5 or 6am or later. I knew the road well, and knew there were 4 houses along the way, but they are all older people, so waking them up was doubtful.
I decided to try to walk it. Halfway home I was starting to feel weak and knew I was not going to make it. I was near a farmhouse, but I knew the elderly people had moved to town, and there may or may not be anyone at the house. I began walking toward the house when I heard their cattle in the barn, which was closer to me than the house. I went into the barn, and it was warmer and not windy, but I was damn cold. Although I have had horses most of my life, I have never had much experience with cows. But it did not take me long to walk up to a cow and warm myself against her. After warming up, I walked around the barn, found an old calf blanket, wrapped that around me, and that's when I saw a phone on the wall. But I soon found out the phone was dead.
I just stayed in that barn until dawn, and was not sure what sort of reaction I'd get when the farmer walked in, but I was not going to freeze. But thats when I noticed the wind and snow had stopped, so I walked the rest of the way home. I later called the farmer, told him what happened, and told him I borrowed that calf blanket. He said he was glad I was ok, and told me to just bring the blanket back whenever I could, which I did that same day, after having a friend tow my car home.

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On 03/04/2015 04:41 AM, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

Glad you made it. I usually have several blankets in my car.
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Per snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com:

Nobody has mentioned snowmobile suits.
Where I live it's not even that cold - but around Thanksgiving I throw a nylon duffel bag into the back seat that contains, among other things, a snowmobile suit. Dunno how cold it has to be to freeze to death in one of those things, but they are quite a bit warmer compared to regular pants/coat.
--
Pete Cresswell

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On 03/04/2015 08:35 AM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

When I was in the Army and had to stand guard duty in the German winters we were issued arctic clothing.
I kept most of it and have walked for miles in -20F without getting cold.
One such day I walked down to the lake and there was still plenty of open water and I saw ducks swimming in it.
Now /that/ made me freeze just thinking about it.
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On Wed, 04 Mar 2015 04:41:41 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

In the car you are dry and out of the wind, and you won't be wandering lost in the blizzard. With a good warm blanket and a few candles you can avoid freezing to death if you stay dry.

I've been in blizards where you couldn't see more than a car length when you were in the car - the snow going sideways at 40MPH and more meant you couldn't see 3 feet when you were out in the wind.
Stupid to be caught out in that weather - and DEADLY stupid to be walking around in it.

That's OK if you don't have 3-4 foot drifts to plough through, and if you can see the barn

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On 3/4/2015 9:18 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

CY: Much warmer. Yes, I do have a couple candles in the back seat, and a lighter and matches. And some stiff wire, so I can hang a candle from miror or visor.

CY: We learned,in government schools to pull over and put on the fourway flashers. Less likely for someone to think you are in a lane and moving, and tailend collide with you.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On 3/4/2015 9:18 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

We get our share of snow here in CT,but usually not that bad. I've driven in plenty of snow, but if predicted to be that bad, I stay home. Weather reports today are fairly accurate so few people have reason to take the risk..
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On 3/4/2015 9:38 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On the alt.survival list, the question was posed by a fellow in Colorado who was going to Arizona. He asked me what were some good things to have in the vehicle. One of the items later came to mind was NOAA radio. I've been out of town and looked at the weather channel in the motel room, that's been a big help. Took a different route, avoided the snow area. But, yes, weather reports (radio, TV, computer web page) are a big help, easier to stay out of trouble than go through trouble.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
learn more about Jesus
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On Thursday, March 5, 2015 at 6:28:56 AM UTC-6, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I gotta save that one!
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On Wed, 04 Mar 2015 21:18:16 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I had two advantages. 1. I was close to home and know the area real well. 2. Although the snow was blowing real hard, it was not real deep, and because the road is elevated th snow was blowing into the fields and not staying on the road.
Another time, I actually got stuck in my own driveway, walking! There was a drift at least 7 feeet tall, and my legs just sunk in, and snow packed between my legs. I was only 200 feet from my house, but I barely made it back to the house. I had to just roll backward to get out of that drift, and that just made me colder as the snow packed inside my clothing.
But I saw one worse. A neighbor boy, who was about 12 years old, went out in a blizzard, hooked up a homemade sled to his small pony, and found himself lost in the extreme blowing and deep snow. The pony got stuck. The snow was packed under it's belly and it kept falling over and thrashing around, and the sled made it worse. Luckily he had gone off the road and was in a field right along my driveway, and managed to get to my door. I was shocked to hear a knock on the door in that blizzard. He was so cold he could hardly talk, but he started crying about his pony.
The last thing I wanted to do was go out in that storm, but I was not going to let that pony freeze, so as soon as the boy warmed up, I gave him some dry clothing, which was too big for him, but dry. I dressed myself real warm, got on my tractor and started to push snow. We finally got to the pony who was ready to give up from exhaustion. The sled was all busted up, so I just cut the ropes and tossed it aside. Then I carefully plowed right along the side of the pony, and we hooked a rope to him, and real easily pulled him out of the deep snow. Once he was out of the drift, he got up, but was very stiff. By that time, I was barely able to drive the tractor, the boy was no better, and the pony was barely able to walk. I told the boy to stand on the tractor drawbar, and hold that pony's rope real tight, so he walks along behind. As soon as we got to my house, not only did myself and the boy come inside, but so did the pony.
I called the boys parents and told them he was ok, but he was staying at my house till the storm is over.
That could have been a disaster. But the boy and the pony were ok. The sled ended up becoming firewood though. I think storms like this are worse in the country, because there are fewer places to go for help and less buildings to use as marker points. It's just one huge sheet of snow that goes on for acres, and sometimes miles...... After many years of living in the country, I think I know what to do, but there is always some new problem that occurs. But I have learned over the years to just stay in the house when a storm is coming, and stay there till it's over. I know that boy learned a hard lesson that day too. Then again, I never heard of a pony getting stuck in the snow either....
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