Make the doorway higher.

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Hi,
I would like to make this doorway higher to match the rest of the doors in my house.
http://freeboundaries.com/raisethedoor.jpg
This is weight bearing wall so my plan is to build two temp walls on either side of the door, lining up with the joists. Then take out the header, the "ladder" piece (if I'm not mistaken), the two 2x4's that the header is resting on, and then rebuild. Does that sound like the correct plan?
Thanks!
Aaron
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Aaron Fude wrote:

Should work, but I'd be very careful and would be tempted to overbuild seeing as it *is* load bearing. Maybe make the header from 2x6's on edge rather than 2x4s as currently used.
nate
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On Sun, 19 Oct 2008 14:46:02 -0700 (PDT), Aaron Fude

Why? That photo tells me you have a lot of work on the other side too do later.

All this for one door in a house?
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Im I blind, I dont see it load bearing anything, the 2 outside 2x4 you leave inplace, they bear load, above the door bears no weight. I would just raise it. If it was a few pole screw jacks and a 4x4 would be easier than building support walls
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Aaron -- pay no attention to Ransley. He has no idea what he's talking about. The stud above the door absolutely *is* load-bearing.
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On Oct 19, 10:12pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

You are blind, the support is the 2 outer 2x4 that go to the ceiling, the 2 inner that attach to the header above door support nothing, blow up the photo and look, the ceiing joists are on the outer 2x4 that wont even be removed to put in a taller door.
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You _do_ see those two joists running across the top of th door opening, right??
Take out that one cripple stud and you have two unsupported joists in a load bearing wall. Clues:
1: at least one of the joists has been spliced above the door. 2: The joists run at right angles to the wall.
Doug is correct - you don't know what you are talkign about.
Harry K
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There is no concern, nor can anyone viewing it full 500% zoom on a 24" monitor see one, to the right and left of door opening are single studs floor to ceiling that hold all load, to the right in corner is another full stud, above those is maybe a 4x6" beam under the joists that will stay supported. The corner is well built. To the left of the door are 2, 2x12 joists where stairs go up, supported by the full stud to the left of the door and another stud about only 12" further left. The 2 inner apx 7ft studs and one 12" center in the door middle do nothing for above support, they support the door itself, joists are still suported by the double 2x4 under joists. Remove those 3 and lath-plaster and nothing will happen. Its plain as day. Do you guys just guess, or actualy remove and design additions. This house was well built.
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Okay, you are figuring the double top plate is sufficient support. I thought that was your idea. Call that a 36" opening between your two full length studs (by the way, single full length studs in that position would never pass modern standards). Per you, that is all that is needed. Now say that the clear span is 48" - still enough?, 60"? Just where do you, in your vast knowledge of constructions standards, begin to add a real (as defined by construction standards) header and cripples?
The standard is, or was when I took a carpentry course (applied) 40 years ago, a double 2x6 above all door openings and cripples at 16" (24" if studding is 2x6). Anything less would fail inspection.
Yes, you could "probably" get away with your jackleg, cut corner, method. It still would be piss poor work.
Harry K
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The full length studs will *easily* support the top plate (as they do now), regardless of any code considerations. -----
- gpsman
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Top plate yes. The load the top plate is carrying - no. Don't tell me tht you also don't think it is a load bearing wall. Construction standards have been developed for good and sufficient reasons - it is best to follow them. Of course if you can convince a construction engineer that that is o.k...
Harry K
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Addition. You are also overlooking the function of that cripple stud in the middle. It is transfering the load to the two jack studs. Even with that put back in it still falls far short of standard construction.
Harry K
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Harry K wrote:

I don't think anybody said he should build it back without a header over the door. What most of us said was, for the time it takes to do the work, the wall is unlikely to have any problems. But if OP is nervous, a section of beam a little wider than the door, and a screw post or two, to temporarily catch the weight of the joists over the door, would eliminate any concern. Even a couple of angled 2x4 kickers under the top plate, and toenailed into floor, would probably be plenty.
-- aem sends...
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Agreed that it will hold long enough to do the work. However what 'most' have said is far from what you re claiming:
One sample: ----------------------------------

That wall ain't going nowhere, and the header isn't supporting squat.
-----------------------------------
Harry K
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So you think the cripple stud isn't supporting any of the weight that's loaded on the top plate?
I'm not blind ... but you're ignorant. Don't try to give structural advice. You haven't the first clue.
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On Oct 20, 5:59pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

A clue, Ive done years of remodeling like that, the HO will not have any issues, I would not worry doing it in my house.
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I notice you didn't answer this. I wonder why.

Yes, and I've done years of cleaning up after other people who did remodeling like that. The homeowner sure as hell will have issues if he follows your advice and rebuilds without a cripple stud; the cripple stud IS load-bearing, whether you are able to understand that or not. The fact that you would not worry about doing it in your house does not mean it's a good idea.
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It is people like you who give real carpenters problems and causes the public to look down upon the trades, assuming of course that you actually do remodeling.
Harry K
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Too much work. The king studs carry the load, so simply remove the 2 x 4's and jack studs, install new jack studs with 2 x 6, 2 x 8 or even 2 x 12 headers on edge with 1/2" plywood spacer in between. Look at some new house construction in your area to see what current best practices are where you live. IIRC, 80 1/4" is the common distance from subfloor to header. If you have a framing nailer it will go together quickly. An impact driver and construction screws are even cheaper overall cost and won't crack plaster like hammering used to. Have fun.
Joe
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82.5" is the proper rough opening height.
s

together quickly. An impact driver and construction screws are even cheaper overall cost and won't crack plaster like hammering used to. Have fun.
Joe
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