Major Tornado in Oklahoma City

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The tornado that tore through Oklahoma City today left a path of destruction over a mile wide. In some places the damaged area is 2 1/4 miles across. My understanding is that tornado;s are generally less than 300 yards across, but the damage can extend over a much larger area because of the debris the tornado throws around.
I'm thinking that more intense storms like this are the result of global warming. With warmer air temperatures you have more moisture in the air, and as that moisture condenses to form rain you get more energy released into the surrounding atmosphere. More energy = more powerful storms.
I heard on the news that with global warming would come more powerful hurricanes, and I guess we're going to be seeing larger and more powerful tornados too.
--
nestork


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On Tue, 21 May 2013 00:20:19 +0200, nestork

Mile wide tornadoes aren't rare.

I'm thinking you're dancing on the graves of the children.

I guess you haven't heard that "Global Warming" has been put on hold. ...or that tornadoes aren't exactly a rarity in OK.
Idiot.
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On 5/20/2013 7:59 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

They may not be a rarity in OK but they are not as common per square mile of land as they are in Florida.
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In wrote:

they don't call it tornado alley for nothing. I've lived in NorthTX for over forty years and its spring time, its tornado season Look up the one that went threw Dallas in 57, it wern't no little twister
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You're wrong.
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nestork wrote:

It's tornado alley, this tornado was really bad, as was the one in the same location 13+ years ago, and numerous ones in the state over the centuries. It's sadly nothing out of the norm for the area, just higher casualties and publicity due to the ever increasing population.
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wrote:

The meteorologist on the drive in this morning was saying that the chance of a damaging tornado in that area is 30% within 25 miles of any given spot, each May. The chance of a killer tornado in OK is 100%, each May.
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KR Williams (krw @ att.net) wrote:

What are the chances of seeing higher nationwide insurance costs due to these floods, explosions, forest fires and tornadoes?
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None, but it's obvious that you don't understand insurance, or much of anything else, HomoGay.
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One thing that made this so bad is that it went from nothing to an F5 in about 1 hour.
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On Tue, 21 May 2013 00:20:19 +0200, nestork

THE END IS NEAR THE END IS NEAR THE END IS NEAR
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On Tue, 21 May 2013 02:51:51 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@isnear.com wrote:

In fact, you end is the only thing you can see.
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I think it was the Michael Savage show, I was listening last night. He reminds us that the same part of the world, Oklahoma, has been getting tornados for the last several hundred years of recorded history. Long since mankind started using fossil fuels. That the earth has been cooling for the last 30 or so years. And that we should expect the likes of Al Gore to be back in the news. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
The tornado that tore through Oklahoma City today left a path of destruction over a mile wide. In some places the damaged area is 2 1/4 miles across. My understanding is that tornado;s are generally less than 300 yards across, but the damage can extend over a much larger area because of the debris the tornado throws around.
I'm thinking that more intense storms like this are the result of global warming. With warmer air temperatures you have more moisture in the air, and as that moisture condenses to form rain you get more energy released into the surrounding atmosphere. More energy = more powerful storms.
I heard on the news that with global warming would come more powerful hurricanes, and I guess we're going to be seeing larger and more powerful tornados too.
--
nestork


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On 5/20/2013 6:20 PM, nestork wrote:

The global warming alarmists blame everything on global warming. All the storms like this have happened in the past. Build in a hundred year flood plain like on the Jersey shore or in a tornado alley, eventually the statistics will catch up with you.
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The worst tornado in the US was back in 1925. Killed 695. Did global warming cause that too?
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On 5/21/2013 7:07 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Tornadoes that wide are rare but occur.

We have had 3 1-in-1000 year rain storms in MN recently.
When was the last time the arctic ocean got as ice free as it is getting now?
Specific events can't be linked to global warming. Trends can. "More energy = more powerful storms" is true in general (but can't be tied to this tornado).
(I don't think anyone links current hurricane activity to global warming at this point.)

Not a valid way to compare.
Did they predict a major storm with possibility of tornadoes days in advance of the 1925 tornado? Was there 15-40 minutes warning for the 1925 tornado? Did they have sirens and weather radio for warning in 1925?
This tornado people were advised to drive away. Looking at scenes of destruction I can see why. I don't remember that advice previously.
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It was a few years when we had the big outbreaks before and after Katrina. The Hurricane Forecase center and others were pointing to GW as heating up the seas and how we were going to see the norm being like that year. The next year they forecast 5 more storms than appeared in what was one of the more sedate years for hurricanes. THAT was explained away by at least a couple people as being related to GW because that caused sand storms in Africa that built up sand particles in the atmosphere that made it harder for hurricanes to form. GW was the reason for the exceedingly warm weather in 2012 winter and there were many forecasts that it was going to be another repeat this winter. Which, returned to the mean. I have already heard that GW will be responsible to another hot, hot summer and a draught. We'll see how that works out.

Talk about lack of valid comparisons.

This is a new wrinkle the Weather Service put in place for this year. Mostly related to alarm fatigue and people were ignoring the warnings. So, they jazzed them up a little bit more and made them a little more specific as to what to expect.
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I call this the Bill Murray school of forecasting. Remember the line from Ghostbusters. \ "Dogs and Cats! Living Together! Mass Hysteria!"
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On 5/21/2013 8:44 AM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

When you don't have basements, and the tornado completely removes the house, the best option may to drive away.
For alarm fatigue there is new NWS language - something like "tornado emergency". With 2 other bad tornadoes in the last 15 years I don't think there is alarm fatigue in Moore.
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1/4

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I didn't say it's a valid way to compare. It's just as valid though as trying to tie this latest tornado to global warming. And it shows that deadly tornadoes are nothing new or unusual.

Those are valid points. To those you should add, was the population of the areas hit anywhere near what it is today?

Are you sure about that? I heard people talking about possibly driving away AFTER, but was not aware that officials had given out that advice. It seems especially odd advice, because if 25 people try to drive away it's one thing. If you give that advice to the whole town, everybody not only where the tornado actually wound up hitting, but everyone in the path of where it might be in 10 mins, how well is that going to work?
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