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wrote:

The plunge mechanism is controlled by a couple of springs trapped in the plunge mechanism. It is not too big a deal to remove the springs if you want to mount the router in a table. The trick then becomes how to "dial in" a specific bit height. You may be better off saving your pennies for one of those Triton (made in Australia?) routers that come with the "above the table" bit height crank knob. There are also good plans online for bit height adjusters that are basically a chunk of all-thread and a plywood disc.
Make sure to invest in some hearing protection... routers really scream.
The best router table I have ever had was a replacement wing for my table saw... I can use the table saw fence for the router, and I save a whole bunch of space in my shop. The wing was kind of pricey, but then again so is buying/building a good standalone router table. ====================================================== Good idea. I did something similar with a RAS, just drilled holes under the table for the base of a non-plunge router. No rip fence, but c-clamping a guide on the table was no biggie. Used it mebbe once. :)
I screwed a sabre saw to the underside of a table saw leaf, for a diy jig saw. Controlled the speed with a variac. THAT was handy!
A diy drop-leaf of 3/4 ply on a workbench would do well, also, and serve other purposes when another cupla square feet of bench are needed. Well, mebbe not 3/4 ply for a sabre saw -- 1/8" alum sheet or steel would be better for under-mounting a sabre saw, altho the 3/4 wood seemed OK for the router.
--
EA





Get yourself a good book on routers, or visit the library and check
out a couple. Keep a good grip while using it, they are deceptively
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In Craftsman routers of that vintage, beware the ARHA feature. It might be the reason the router was almost new. It doesn't take very long to get tired of the feature.
jc
(arha=automatic, random height adjustment)
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On 1/5/2010 7:06 AM, Joe wrote:

The reason it was almost new is that my father was elderly, and he never used it very much, if at all. There's little to no sawdust on it.
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No offense intended. The arha feature is something of a running reference in another newsgroup about that particular routers tendency to have bits slip in the collet and therefore automatically (and randomly) change the depth of cut. Here's hoping yours doesn't do that. To answer your question, yes, it can be mounted in a router table. I had mine in one for years in addition to using it handheld. You definitely want it in a router table if you plan on spinning any larger diameter bits.
Have fun!
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through the

go
plunge
IIRC the Craftsman routers are not thought of well by woodworkers as the collets tend to loosen when they should stay tight and as a result gain the nick name carbide ejectors or something like that.
You might want to ask about them on rec.woodworking those guys seem to know their tools.
--
Roger Shoaf
If you are not part of the solution, you are not dissolved in the solvent.
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