Main breaker panel <100 Amps

Does anybody know of a main breaker panel rated <100 Amps?
This is for a small barn. I don't need 20-odd circuits, and the existing feed is only 40A.
I want a main breaker in the barn so I can cut power. The house is 200ft+ away. Only thing I can find smaller than a full 100A panel is a "Main Lug" type, which has no way to cut power without running all the way back to the house.
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*Use a main lug panel. Install a 40 amp breaker in the spaces provided for branch circuit breakers. Install a hold-down clip to secure the 40 amp breaker in place. On the label inside of the circuit breaker panel should be a part number for the hold-down clip which you most likely have to get from an electrical supply company. Connect your feed wire to the 40 amp breaker.
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On Wed, 4 Jan 2012 09:46:49 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Put a 40A double breaker in a box made for one double breaker. Feed that into a "Main Lug" panel. However, in all honesty, 40A is awfully small for a barn. I live on a farm, and I have THREE 100A panels. One in the barn, one in the house, one in the garage. On the meter pole is a 400A main to feed all of these. I also have a separate feed to a small shed that still has an older 60A fuse box (actual fuses), but that shed only has a couple lights and might run a circular saw or other power tool on occasion. I guess it depends on what you use in your barn, but I'd upgrade the wires to a 100A (or bigger) system.
If you dont need much power and want to save money, just keep the existing 40A main fuses and feed that box to a small breaker box for individual circuits.
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On Wed, 04 Jan 2012 13:25:13 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

I think he's using the term "barn" loosely.

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On Wed, 04 Jan 2012 22:15:26 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Yea, it's probably one of those 10x10 garden tractor sheds. :)
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On 1/4/2012 11:46 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

It cuts everything fed from it, just as does the main in the full panel; it's just on the bus instead of above it. How doesn't it solve the problem?
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On Jan 4, 12:46pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

How many circuits do you currently have installed ?
You can use a "Main Lug" type panel fed from a general duty "safety switch" which would allow you to disconnect power to the entire panel...
You can install such a switch immediately adjacent to the small panel which you are feeding... They are available in indoor rated and outdoor rated in amperage capacities from 30 through 600...
Don't try and "rig up" a feed through a circuit breaker into the panel as you can buy one of the general duty safety switches and be able to kill all power entering the sub-panel and be able to do any work on it in the future with everything inside of it de-energized...
~~ Evan
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On Jan 4, 12:46pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Do you even need a breaker or fuses? How about just a disconnect switch next to the existing panel. I'm ASSuming for purposes of this post that you ahve a 40A breaker in the house and that it is feeding a subpanel in the barn.
nate
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On 1/4/2012 9:46 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

use any size panel you want and feed it through a double branch breaker sized as you please. Ignore the main lugs (or breaker) in this case.
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
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On 1/4/2012 8:11 PM, Steve Barker wrote:

That is my suggestion also. The 2-pole disconnect breaker will be backfed. The NEC wants an additional means of securing the breaker so it won't come out. For SquareD it is a bar that mounts on the gutter rail. Other manufacturers should have an equivalent. Big box stores may not have them.
The NEC wants a disconnect at the separate building, as dennis is intending.
--
bud--


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On Wed, 4 Jan 2012 09:46:49 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Use a small sub-panel and a separate FUSED DISCONNECT. They are readily available. If you have a total aversion to fuses, for some reason, a breaker disconnect panel like a Square D QO2L30SCP (30 amp 220) or QO2L40SCP (40 amp) can be used.
Or a King LPWA CB3, or a Sinclair AMM001DSA, I believe.
But absolutely nothing wrong with a fused disconnect - as used for Air Conditioner outdoor units. etc.
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