Lubricate screw threads for long term protection agains sticking

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What (if any) lubricant can I use on a screw/nut to keep it from binding over time? I may not need to loosen the nut for a decade or more.
The nut is part of the burner assembly on our range so it is exposed to some heat (but not direct flame). It also gets some moisture exposure due to the inherent moisture content in Natural gas.
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Anti-Seize, available at any good hardware or industrial supply store. There are a few different varieties. You can also get it at www.mcmaster.com
Most are good to 2000 degrees, but there is a high heat that can go to 2900 degrees.
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Use antiseize from any NAPA or other auto parts store.
Joe
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Hugh? The whole idea to use a nut and bolt is to hold good and tight with some adequate friction to produce a binding. A lubricant doesn't make sense in this application. Depending on what you have, sometimes a lock washer is a good idea.
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Phisherman wrote:

I don't know Hugh, but actually on the threads it does make some sense to keep out moisture and minimize corrosion w/ time. The friction is on the nut surface. I'd suggest actually the nonlocking high-temp Loctite for the particular application.
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...

Hmmm. Interesting, never thought of it.
But presumably there's also a LOT of friction between the THREADS and the grooves (what's the technical name for them?) -- not that I know anything, but just from the feel of tightening a nut, that that's what the tightening is doing, squeezing the threads (male, or is my groove-vs-thread vocab totally wrong?) TIGHTLY TIGHTLY **TIGHTLY** against the sides of the grooves (female?), SO tightly as to result in LOTS of friction (ie, LOTS of force NEEDED to OVERCOME that friction)?
Can someone restate this (if basically correct) more intelligently and with the proper technical vocabulary?
THANKS!
David

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Friction and tight is ok -- I just don't want it to be so *tight* that it binds/rusts in place and becomes unremoveable. Also, since there is no vibration or force on the nuts, I don't need it to be locked so tight that the nut is near-impossible to remove.
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add routine maintence item, move nut loosen and tighten a little yearly.......
although your range may fail from other problems before this nut becomes a showstopper
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bob haller wrote:

I'd get stainless hardware, use anti-seize and not worry about it.
nate
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wrote:

Stainless has a habit of gaulding and making it even worse than rust.
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i echo that espically if the stanless meets another non stainless metals
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This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------030007020209010006010301 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hence, the recommendation for anti-seize .. .. NO SEIZE = NO GALLING easy to take apart. I worked in the food industry most of my life, and EVERYTHING was stainless .. we went through NEVER-SEIZE like water. If we tried to take something apart and it was galled up,, we'd look up the previous work order and find out who last worked on that item .. .. they were in for a serious prayer meeting. We even had a special "food-grade" type that was ok for casual, direct contact with our product.
--------------030007020209010006010301 Content-Type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <meta content="text/html;charset=UTF-8" http-equiv="Content-Type"> <title></title> </head> <body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#990000"> <br> <br> <blockquote cite="mid: snipped-for-privacy@f30g2000vbf.googlegroups.com" type="cite"> <blockquote type="cite"> <blockquote type="cite"> <pre wrap="">I'd get stainless hardware, use anti-seize and not worry about it. </pre> </blockquote> <blockquote type="cite"> <pre wrap=""> </pre> </blockquote> <pre wrap="">Stainless has a habit of gaulding and making it even worse than rust.
</pre> </blockquote> <pre wrap=""><!----> i echo that espically if the stanless meets another non stainless metals </pre> </blockquote> <br> <br> Hence, the recommendation for anti-seize .. ..  NO SEIZE = NO GALLING easy to take apart.   I worked in the food industry most of my life, and EVERYTHING was stainless .. we went through NEVER-SEIZE like water.   If we tried to take something apart and it was galled up,, we'd look up the previous work order and find out who last worked on that item .. .. they were in for a serious prayer meeting.   We even had a special "food-grade" type that was ok for casual, direct contact with our product.<br> </body> </html>
--------------030007020209010006010301--
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Whatever "gaulding" is ... Interesting nontheless.
David
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David Combs wrote:

I'd guess it's some type of corrosion. Just the other day I had to pull the cap off my well and the stainless bolts I put in the rusty steel/cast lid didn't want to come out easy. I ended up taking the cap in the garage and using oil and working them back and forth removed the stainless bolts. I then used some lubriplate on them and replaced the cap.
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snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote in wrote:

it's "galling".
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Jim Yanik
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Well it's not a regular nut/bolt - it's special hardware both pieces are bronze also.
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The answer is TefGel. VERY expensive stuff, but it is exactly right for this application, and a tiny bit goes a very long way. I use it for things such as mounting stainless hardware with stainless screws into aluminum spars on my boat, in a salt water environment. Ordinarily, that would be a recipe for horrendous corrosion. TefGel solves the issue.
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Before the following discussion on stainless-steel -- please, someone, say a bit more about this periodic loosening and retightening, pros and cons of it, what situations for doing and not doing it.
(To avoid (actually, evade) that discussion (stainless), suppose:
it's possible that you don't HAVE any of those, and/or they're too EXPENSIVE to replace all the ones you already have with them.)
Thanks!
David
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snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote in wrote:

use the same stuff auto mechanics use on Oxygen sensors and spark plugs; a hi-temp anti-seize compound. Permatex makes a nice one,you can buy it at most auto stores.
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Jim Yanik
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Not much works in those conditions. Maybe something made for furnaces and fireplace doors. I used to have some high temp stuff from Kroil company.
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Christopher A. Young
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