low water pressure solution?

First, go to flushmaster.com
We have low water pressure in that a shower feels like a drizzle. To solve this it seems to me that you could put one of these sealed pressure tanks in hooked to you city water for water supply, but with that pressure system you could run your water pressure up to 60 lbs or more if your plumbing could stand it.
The sealed pressure system tank doesn't cost much, some of smaller ones little over 50$. But expectedly the bigger, more water volume would probably be best. But I think the size is regulated by the amount of water supplied in a certain amount of time.
They seem easy to hook into you water system. Just like making a splice, one pipe in and one pipe out. The only thing you might have to put some solenoid to turn water supply on and off, when tank reaches desire pressure, but those are basically inexpensive.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

While the original message wan nothing more than SPAM. Lets make some good use out of it.
Low water pressure from a shower is seldom the problem of low water pressure, but rather something at the shower.
Newer showers have water use reduction devices. The first ones were poorly designed and while they did reduce water usage they provided a less than satisfactory shower. If you have one of those, I suggest replacing it, nothing is going to fix it and a good quality replacement head is cheap.
The next thing to consider is any shower that has been up there for a while is likely to have some build up of deposits preventing it from working as intended. If you still have the instructions that came with it, it may have some directions on cleaning. If not try one of the lime cleaning products from the store. They can do a good job.
Lastly if you have a newer shower head and it is working as intended and you just want more flow than the restricted flow will provide there is an answer. In most cases if you take it apart, you will find the restriction device. Usually a plastic or metal disk with a hole in the middle. Drill out the hole a little larger (it does not take much) and replace it. Don't over do it. You really don't need a flood and the greater the flow the more the cost of water, and more important heated water.
--
Joseph Meehan

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Sorry, didn't mean it to be spam. I thought that was where the parts were that I was talking about.
I've replaced all of our old cast iron pipe with PVC or CPVC. We still have low pressure throughout the house and the shower sucks, or, well drizzels!
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Sorry if I mistook you original message as SPAM. It did sound that way. :-)
I suggest that you start by comparing your situation with your neighbors (you are on city water correct?). The local pressure may be low. If it is just your home, then you may have a pressure regulator and it may be set too low or malfunctioning. If it is everyone's home, then contact the local water company and see what they have to say.
Another direction would be to check the actual pressure at your home. You can get a cheap pressure meter that you can screw in and measure the pressure. What do you get from that test? what happens when you turn on some water? does it reduce. If the pressure stays the same when you turn on some water some where in the home, then it sounds like a supply (city) problem. If it drops when you turn on water elsewhere in your home it sounds like a problem with a restriction between the city and you.
The only way of deciding what might work best is to know what is causing the problem. Let us know what you find.
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Joseph Meehan

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We have an old house (about 50 yrs) Have had low water pressure for years and thought we would have to have new plumbing. It is a two story house so the plumber replaced the iron pipes in the basement and it solved our water pressure problem. Just a few hundred dollars.

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

or
ones
to
J Meehan has some good advice. If that doesn't cure the problem:
Before anything else you need to determine if you have a pressure or a flow problem. Check your static pressure (pressure reading with no water running). A plug type guage (just hold it against a spigot) isn't all that expensive. Then check the dynamic pressure. The pressure reading with water running preferably right by where you are reading the pressure.
The dynamic will be lower but shouldn't be by much. If it is grossly different you have a flow restriction somewhere. From most common to least:
1. Plugged filter system 2. Corroded pipes 3. Partially closed valve up stream of point of use.
To illustrate with a grossly simplified hydraulic explanation.
Hydraulic pressure will be the same throughout the closed system. That is, if street pressure is 60psi, you will have 60 psi at any fixture in the house -as long as no water is running-. That is static pressure. Restrictions cause a reduction in pressure as there is insufficient flow to maintain pressure. Corroded pipes would allow a 60psi static (even a pinhole would eventually reach system static pressure) but could have near zero dynamic.
Harry K
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You will get absolutely no more pressure from adding a pressure tank to your city water supply. You will gain the ability to have a greater volume than your main line can provide, but only until the pressure in the tank is drained down... I have considered this myself. Not because of a pressure problem, though.

Not really. It's a matter of how long you want the increased volume availeble before you're back to where you'd be with no pressure tank (after the pressure in the tank drains down if you're using more water than the main can provide).

You won't need anything but the actual pressure measurement of your incoming water from the city. Then you can properly pressurize the tank. Once the incoming water pressure has been reached in the tank the flow will stop to the tank from the main.
The benefit of having a pressure tank hooked to city water system is as follows (the way I see it):
You can install larger diameter supply plumbing throughout your house than your incoming main's diameter. The pressure tank will store up a large volume of water ready to feed your faucets and will maintain a higher flow rate throughout the house than your main can provide. That is until the pressure in the tank is drained (if you're using more water than your main can provide at once). If you're using less water than your main can provide there will be no change. The tank will stay charged and you'll be using the water from your main. But as soon as you start drawing more than your main can provide the pressure tank will automatically dispense more water to your house until it runs out of pressure its self. Basically you'd have to add a few tanks to have any sustainable "super" flow rate throughout your house (say... flushing the toilet and doing laundry while someone is in the shower).
Also, a pressure tank installed like you describe would pretty much eliminate water hammer, or at least greatly reduce it.
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Try a pressure booster pump connected to the pressure tank (shallow well pump). You can increase the pressure if it is very low, like 20 PSI, to 60 PSI. But if your pipes are too small, you may still have a problem.
Stretch
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Put in the bladder tank, and add a check valve to prevent backflow into the supply mains.
That way, you always start off with your inside plumbing pressure at the top of the supply fluctuation cycle.
--
SVL




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