Low Water Pressure - City Water


I have a raised-elevation freestanding house on city water at the end of the line with a long driveway. The problem is low water pressure throughout the house. It's low coming into the house (20 psi or so...) Otherwise..., the plumbing is OK.
This causes all sorts of incoveniences. Showers have no power. Basin faucets go to a trickle if the washing machine kicks on, etc.
I know there are various booster pumps available. Are there any alternatives? I was thinking of some sort of bladder tank arrangement with a pump similar to well-water systems or possibly a standpipe...
Wondering if anyone can recommend the best solution, what worked for them, and discuss pros and cons.
Beachcomber
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we had a friend with a similiar predicament. He just installed a shallow well pump inline to a 50gallon storage tank. Set the pressure where you want.
s

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On Jan 13, 6:30 pm, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.none (Beachcomber) wrote:

Sorry - I have to ask - What does the city say about it? My city water is 89 psi, and I have a friend in another state that has to have a regulator to get his water down to a reasonable pressure.
JK
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Big_Jake wrote:

These high pressures are frequently the result of a city water distribution system that didn't keep pace with development. They're now undersized. The static pressure is high, at times of high load the pressures drop quite a bit. And, water heaters get replaced a bit more often.
Living with a well, I found that plumbing with 1" copper helps a lot. My pressure tank is between 45 and 65 psi. The larger pipe means that there is little distribution pressure drop.
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Boden wrote:

Not necessarily, using higher pressure on mains (not just water) and a regulator at the point of utilization is a classic design method to insure there is always constant pressure at the point of utilization.

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Yep. It is impossible to design a city distribution system for equal pressure at all elevations. Then there is the desire for high pressure at hydrants for fire suppression vice reasonable pressure in a residence.
Thus it is, at least here, up to the people living in the excessive high pressure zones to install a pressure reducer.
Harry K
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Ummmm, Jake, at 89 psi you need a regulator also...and then the system will need an expansion tank.
Water companies use of pressure to solve problems with system capacity pushes costs up for the homeowners. We end up paying twice: once for operating a distribution system at higher pressure and again for stepping that pressure down.
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They require a regulator at 90 psi. I haven't had any issues, but the water main has broken in the street 3 times in the last 4 years. :-)
JK
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Beachcomber wrote:

A booster pump and tank may be the answer as Barker suggested.
I would do some more investigating before installing it though.
The trickle when the wash m/c operates makes me suspicious that there is a flow problem as well as pressure loss. If so, a pump may not be able to cope.
Ask the city if this is a known problem there. Ask neighbors if they experience exactly the same conditions you do.
Look for evidence of galvanized iron piping in the service; even a short nipple can create a terrible blockage.
Consult with the city before installing a pump. They may have prohibitions on pumps or requirements, such as backflow valves. Do lots of homework on this project first.
Jim
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Have you talked to the city about this? That's the first step. Maybe they're unaware of a pumping station or main line problem.
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First, I'd find out why it is so low. Do you have low static pressure (like when noting is being used) or does it drop once a faucet is opened? If the latter, it may be the feed pipes are old and clogged.
More information is needed. Type of pipe? Size? Pressure at nearby houses? Have you talked to the town water department? They may be unaware of your problem and can help if you tell them.
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Beachcomber wrote:

Did you ask/complain to the city? My house was also on an old dead end line with similar issues. Our water system is owned by a water company that serves the region. It took some calling to the local town council and water company and getting the neighbors to do the same before they replaced the line.
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On Jan 13, 4:30pm, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.none (Beachcomber) wrote:

Assuming you measured the pressure coming as static, i.e., nothing being used:
The 20psi coming in is suspicious. I can't feature any city, town...etc. supplying pressure that low. I would first check the pressure at the meter. If low there, then the city (or whoever is supplying the water) has a major problem. If high there, then you have a serious flow restriction in the line between the meter and the house.
Harry K
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(Beachcomber) wrote:

Assuming you measured the pressure coming as static, i.e., nothing being used:
The 20psi coming in is suspicious. I can't feature any city, town...etc. supplying pressure that low. I would first check the pressure at the meter. If low there, then the city (or whoever is supplying the water) has a major problem. If high there, then you have a serious flow restriction in the line between the meter and the house.
Harry K
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well, it\'s possible. my local town provides me with pressure at about 20 or
sometimes even less. the local tank for providing water is in the next
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Beachcomber wrote:

Here's the first decision tree:
Was the water pressure ever adequate?
If yes, did you change anything?
If no, it's the city's problem.
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