Low voltage

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On 11/18/2015 3:32 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Which way is easier to do? The split receptacle, I'm guessing?
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On 2015-11-18 4:52 PM, Muggles wrote:

not even think splits are allowed in the US, but they are common in Canada.
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On 11/18/2015 3:02 PM, FrozenNorth wrote:

Split receptacles see a bit of use where the "second half" is fed through a switch (fed from the same hot that is feeding the other half of the receptacle).
So, you can have an outlet in your living/bed room where the top half is "always on" and the bottom half is "on when the wall switch is turned on" (e.g., for a table lamp). You typically don't want/need the top AND bottom (of a duplex) to be switched at the same time in these sorts of locations (*two* table lamps plugged into the same receptacle??)
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On 2015-11-18 5:47 PM, Don Y wrote:

with the neutral on the other side. Not sure of the technical name for that.
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On 11/18/2015 04:47 PM, Don Y wrote:

I remember seeing a special extension cord that was two cords sharing a male end. The picture in the ad showed it being used to connect two lamps to one outlet.
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On 11/19/2015 5:24 PM, Mark Lloyd wrote:

Sure! I've got "8 headed" ("hydra"/"medusa") versions of those.
And, we've all seen outlet strips and even age old extension cords with a "cube tap" on the end for 3 or 4 plugs.
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On Wed, 18 Nov 2015 17:02:39 -0500, FrozenNorth

In the US a 120V outlet or lighting circuit MUST have a single (120V) breaker. You cant have a dual (240V) breaker feeding a 120V device. Dual breakers are only for actual 240V devices such as an electric range, water heater, clothes dryer, etc. However, some electric ranges have a 120V outlet and lights on them. I'm guessing they have an internal fuse or breaker for the 120V stuff. (Just a guess, since I have never owned an electric range). I stick with gas ranges.
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On 11/18/2015 2:52 PM, Muggles wrote:

You typically *don't* want to split a duplex receptacle. I.e., so the "top outlet" is on one circuit while the "bottom outlet" is on another.
It's easier (and less labor) to just wire the "odd" duplex receptacles on one "hot" and the "even" duplex receptacles on the *other* "hot". That way, you make only three connections at each fixture instead of *four* (and, don't have to bother trying to isolate the second half of the receptacle to "split" it.)
For example, in our kitchen, (a minimum of) two GFCI circuits are required for "countertop appliances". We know that every other duplex outlet is on the same circuit (because we chose to wire it that way instead of "left half of counter" and "right half of counter").
So, if I want to plug in two electric frying pans, I can safely do so by making sure they are on different duplex receptacles (because ours aren't "split", the top and bottom halves are on the same circuit as is true of most homes) AND make sure that there are an even number of duplex receptacles between the ones we choose.
So, if we plug the first into the third duplex receptacle, then we want to make sure we plug the second frying pan into the second ("zero" receptacles between this and the location of the other frying pan), fourth (again, zero), sixth (two receptacles between the third and sixth": namely, the fourth and the fifth!), eighth (four receptacles skipped over), etc.
It's easiest just to pick two adjacent receptacles and know that one will be "even" while the other is "odd".
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On 11/18/2015 4:45 PM, Don Y wrote:

ahhh I understand what you are saying, now. Thanks for explaining.
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On Mon, 16 Nov 2015 20:44:01 -0600, Dennis

Is there voltage between the neutral and ground?
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Dennis wrote:

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