Low temperature for pulling Romex

Is there a room temperature below which one shouldn't pull Romex?
What is damaged?
--
bud--

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Electricians rough in houses with romex all winter. I've seen it done in temps near zero, so if you are in a room, you should be fine. If it was 40 below I bet it wouldn't work real well. I would think the outer insulation would crack in extreme cold temps, though I'm just guessing.
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A few times I've roughed new houses when the temps were at about zero. The coils of Romex were left on the job, so they're already frozen. You could pull it, and work it, but you move it to quickly or whip it, or it would crack. The plastic nail on boxes were worse than the cable. If you didn't hit the nails dead on, you'd have plastic pieces all over the room. Frozen CAT5 is worse than romex. Even in heated houses, when the box has been sitting in my truck and it's really cold, it's incredibly brittle

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In Canada, there are formal warnings that you shouldn't work with thermoplastic NMD wire at -20C (-4F) or below.

Sheath gets brittle and can shatter if manipulated strongly enough.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
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