Loose front door knob


The inside knob on my front door will not "bite" into the opposing thread. Result: the knob comes loose and people have a lot of trouble opening the door from inside.
I don't want to redo the whole installation because the outside is a beautiful old fixture. What would happen if I glued the rod or shaft (or whatever it's called) from the inside into the opposing thread?
TIA
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No no no. You can replace the worn parts if it is worth fixing. The cheap ones, generally don't have parts available. If you have a cheap model, then replace it. The difference in quality is amazing once you see it.
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Artful Dodger wrote:

I'm assuming you are describing an older door knob screwed onto a square threaded shaft, with a set screw in the knob shank to keep it from rotating on the shaft once it's been screwed down to its proper position.
If the female shaft threads in the knob are really stripped out, then I'd suggest the proper repair would be to bore out the shaft hole in the knob, soft solder a brass plug into that bore, drill and retap it to suit the shaft and drill and retap the setscrew hole.
Failing that you might be able to use a helicoil to restore the knob's inside threat, but the set screw hole could become problematical.
If you can't do any of the above, then take a shot at gluing the knob onto the shaft. I'd recommend using "JB Weld" epoxy for that job.
Or. you could do what I did a six years ago when I had too much time on my hands and decided I just had to trick out our home with a bunch of antique brass doorknobs modified to fit its modern locksets, no two of which now match:
http://home.comcast.net/~jwisnia18/jeff/knob.html
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
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That is correct, as far as I can tell w/ dismantling the whole thing. I keep tightening the set screw, but it's increasingly useless to do so. More drastic measures are required.

I'm afraid I am not competent to do either of the above and can't afford to hire a qualified locksmith.

That's what I was thinking of doing. But I posted on this NG to ascertain whether there is any downside to the procedure. Anything you or other NG members can think of?
TIA

Very pretty. But my outside fixture is more pretty <g> It really is a beautiful antique, which is why I have been putting up with this inconvenience for so long.

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Artful Dodger wrote:

The biggest downside of putting it back together with epoxy glue is that you'll never be able to take it apart again.
If the set screw just keeps coming loose, use some LockTite. It's basically glue that works well enough to keep the screw from turning on its own, but poorly enough to let go when you lean on it with a screwdriver.
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Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
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wrote:

Yeah...but I don't visualize any scenario where I would have to take it apart.... I just want the damn thing to stay in place!

Hi, Steve - the problem isn't the set screw. It's the shaft that fits -- or should fit -- into the female "receptable". See above several suggestions, including an intriguing one: "Wrap the shaft with aluminum foil then screw the knob on. " I'll try it & report back to the NG.
But thanks for tip abvout LockTite, which might work on OTHER doorknobs in my house, most of which have Knob Alzheimer's <g>
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Artful Dodger wrote:

Wrap the shaft with aluminum foil then screw the knob on.
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Gluing it on will work, until you need to get the lock apart. Depending on the application, some aftermarket door knobs are available.
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Christopher A. Young
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