Loose fence post

I have a loose fence post that I would like to fix. This happens to be one that has a gate attached to it, so it would be nice if this particular fence post is level. The fence post is a regular metal one that's cemented to the ground. The fence post to cement part is fine. It's the cement to ground part that's loose. How can I fix that?
Do I try to remove as much cement as I can, then recement? Or do I dig around the existing cement and cement around the existing cement? Something else? The only other thing I can think of doing is to remove as much cement around it as I can, then driving a piece of rebar into the ground as far as I can (near the fence post), Then cement the rebar and fence post togather.
Suggestions?
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Try running a diagonal brace from the top of the post to the bottom of the next post. That will stabilize it in the fence direction; then saturate the soil and rent a hand tamper and pound the soil firmly down all around the loose post. Over time it should be functional again. That's the way ranchers have fixed fences for years. The alternative is to completely replace the post, perhaps with a longer one and recemented, etc. Your call.
Joe
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I really can't do that. It run along the property line and it's the end piece. It's tilted in, as in towarsd the other gate piece. I can't brace it to other property. It's for a 14' gate in the back of a city rowhouse.
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zzyzzx wrote:

Single post to hold up a 14-ft gate is big task even if the gate is fairly lightweight one.
Probably only way your're going to do that is to dig a much bigger hole for larger cross-sectional area perpendicular to fence line to brace against.
The typical way is crossbrace or deadman but if no room for either, then more beef in the hole against the bearing surface is about only choice/alternative.
Or, there's the other expedient of running verticals on both sides with stiff member between and translate the load to the length on the other side of the opening.
--
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It sounds like his giant gate needs to be on wheels to support the load.
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It's 14ft total span between two pieces. Each piece is 7 feet, chain link fence style, and reasonably light. I should have been more specific. I would need to pave the area to use a wheel, I would think.
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zzyzzx wrote:

Why can't you brace it to the other property?
Owner won't let you? There's nothing there to brace it to? Deed restrictions? Zoning problems? Fleas?
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zzyzzx wrote:

Okay, next best thing is to extend the post (possibly replacing it) upwards several feet. From the top, attach two guy wires: one to the far end of the gate the other to a post in the other direction. Thinkg of a giant "A".
What you're trying to do is transfer as much of the gate's weight DOWN on the post with the hinges as possible.
Say the gate is 14' wide and weight 200 pounds. This is equivalent to a 100-pound weight at the end of a 7' lever. That's a huge amount of torque. With the technique outlined above, ALL the weight of the gate is forced down on the post and there is no torque at all (to speak of).
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I presume you mean the pole is not plumb. Place a long level on the pole and check for plumb (on two sides). That will help you know how far to move the pole and which direction.
Dig the soil on one or both sides, and tilt the pole where you need it. Fill-in and compact the soil.
YMMV

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zzyzzx wrote:

Add bracing to the next post down the line, making it extra-strong in the direction opposite to the sag. Then cable the two posts together, and use a turnbuckle for fine adjustment.
But it is a stop-gap. Proper cure is to bite the bullet, and replace the post with a bigger deeper one big enough for the lever action the gate exerts on it. A 14-foot gate needs a wheel on it, or a tower on the hinge side with a cable to suspend the end of the gate. 14 foot is a hell of a lever. And the lever action isn't only in the direction of the fence line- when it is open 90 degrees, and the kid opening it is riding on it, that will pull it out of plumb that direction. Around here, gates that long are usually on rollers, along the fence line, hung like a sliding barn door.
-- aem sends...
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