Looking for thermostat to operate at near 32F - 0C

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Looking for a thermostat to control a small heater in a cold room
I have electricity and nothing else So the heater will be electric Need thermostat that will turn on at and below 32F, off above that
The objective is to keep the room hovering just above freezing, about 32F-34F
Warmer is not a problem. Colder is.
Does anyone know of an off-the shelf plug-in thermostat that can be set for that range ?
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Looking for a thermostat to control a small heater in a cold room
I have electricity and nothing else So the heater will be electric Need thermostat that will turn on at and below 32F, off above that
The objective is to keep the room hovering just above freezing, about 32F-34F
Warmer is not a problem. Colder is.
Does anyone know of an off-the shelf plug-in thermostat that can be set for that range ?
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On 12/2/2012 11:58 AM, Attila Iskander wrote:

able to bend/twist/tweak the thing to move the range down. Might be as simple as grinding the stop off the knob or shaft.
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bi-metal. You may need to adjust the level of the thermostat mounting to compensate somewhat. Run the thermostat on the control side of a contactor with 24 volt winding, using a 24 volt transformer.
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Attila Iskander wrote:

Google shows some in-line 'stats which can do between 10F-100F deg.
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On 12/2/2012 1:58 PM, Attila Iskander wrote:

I posted a link before. ^_^
http://tinyurl.com/ccu2veo
TDD
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Attila Iskander wrote:

You want a "frost thermostat" - try that in Google.
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On Sun, 2 Dec 2012 13:58:58 -0600, " Attila Iskander"

<(Amazon.com product link shortened)>
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Been there, done that, back in the 1970s. Check a Honeywell catalogue and find commercial cooler thermostat with a double pole switch. When I bought mine, I got two, one was to turn on a fan to draw cold air into a cold room when it got warm, the other was to prevent the fan from turning on if it was NOT cold outside. This way the cold room was kept cold but not too cold. The ones I got had a bulb on the end of a copper tube. The one that prevented warm air from being drawn in had its bulb threaded through a hole to the outside to measure the temperature there. They were designed to control 120 or 240 volt equipment.
After all these years, I am sure that Honeywell still makes similar items, possible electronic now, but maybe still have the mechanical ones. They could be purchased through an electrical supplier or a refrigeration supplier.
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On 12/02/2012 01:58 PM, Attila Iskander wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)54556585&sr=8-1&keywords=thermo+cube
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22 days until the winter celebration (Tue Dec 25, 2012 12:00:00 AM for 1
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Grainger has many Tst. it is up to you to pick what you want, if you are going to leave heater on at all times you should use back up Tst.

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Attila Iskander wrote:

Send an email to Honeywell tech support.

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Well, let's see. You want it to maintain a temp just above freezing. That's not a temp range for a house, but it is for a refrigerator. I'd look on Ebay for "refrigerator thermostat". I'm sure you'll find a variety of form factors.
Aside from that, if the goal is to keep things from freezing, I'd go with at least 37F. There can be considerable variation in temps in a room.
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# # Well, let's see. You want it to maintain a temp just above # freezing. That's not a temp range for a house, but it is # for a refrigerator. I'd look on Ebay for "refrigerator thermostat". # I'm sure you'll find a variety of form factors.
Nope It's an uninsulated, unheated concrete "bunker" under a 3-season porch, that is intended as a tornado shelter, but serves mostly as a storage room. In winter, because it's partically exposed above ground level, the temperature drops to nearly the same temperature as outside.
And yes, the idea is to keep it just above freezing, with minimal outlay of energy And no, it's not going to be insulated real soon.
# Aside from that, if the goal is to keep things from freezing, # I'd go with at least 37F. There can be considerable variation # in temps in a room.
And ? Do you have a suggestion ?
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wrote:

I just gave you my two suggestions. One was to look on Ebay for REFRIGERATOR THERMOSTATS. The temp range you want is exactly that of refrigerators. And there are a wide variety of refrigerators, from home to walk-in rooms, so I'll bet you can find an appropriate one that you can use.
The second was that if the intent was to keep things from freezing, you should set the thermostat at 37F or above, because there is likely considerable variation in temp from one spot in the room to another. How much variation depends on a number of factors that we don't know.
Another factor you didn't specify was whether the thermostat has to be 24V or line voltage.
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Would be nice to have some kind of fan, circulating the air within the room. That would help keep the temps even, so you don't freeze stuff at floor level.
I realize the OP only has electric to work with. I think it's a good idea to look at running in natural gas, or some other energy source. Might be cheaper in the long run.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
The second was that if the intent was to keep things from freezing, you should set the thermostat at 37F or above, because there is likely considerable variation in temp from one spot in the room to another. How much variation depends on a number of factors that we don't know.
Another factor you didn't specify was whether the thermostat has to be 24V or line voltage.
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Intend to use small ceramic heater/fan Should take care of moving the air around to keep things balanced Space is only 10'x10'x'8'. So not much is required
And I'm not willing to install a NG heater for this
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Ceramic heater at floor level should do it.
Please let us know how it works out.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Intend to use small ceramic heater/fan Should take care of moving the air around to keep things balanced Space is only 10'x10'x'8'. So not much is required
And I'm not willing to install a NG heater for this
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wrote:

Here's one that fits the range that you want:
http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/COLUMBUS-ELECTRIC-Line-Voltage-Thermostat-2E817?Pid=search
Some of the thermostats designed for home electric (baseboard) heating and which have a minimum setting of 40 degress F. will also work because they will actually hold a setting below the 40 mark. You would, however, have to mount the thermostat in a box with a cord and plug.
Tomsic
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Nope refrigerator Tst. works in opposite direction it must be one that controls heat

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