Looking for Long Life Pilot Lamp

Page 2 of 2  
wrote:

If not LED use two 115 volt bulbs in series. Or use a 230 volt bulb on 115 volts. Also myself and neighbour use a radio frequency baby monitor to 'listen' to the other's house when either of us are away. If/when our intrusion alarm or smoke alarm were to go off the other family will hear it immediately and investigate, We exchange keys and keep an eye on each other's property, have done for years. Couldn't ask for better neighbours although we rarely if ever socialize or attend same church.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Why not give the neighbor a break and you call him when the power goes out, instead of him calling you?
Check out:
http://www.smarthome.com/70050/Sensaphone-400-Remote-Monitoring-and-Control-System/p.aspx
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

LEDs burn out, they go slowly - a few at a time. Use a standard transport vehicle lamp so replacement down the road is more likely to be less painfull.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 28 Apr 2009 19:24:17 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

Yea, and some of us aren't too bright!!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There are LED lamps that just screw into a regular 120 vac Edison Socket. I saw some the other day for about $8USD. Just screw into your porch light socket. They use about 1 watt and there light output is the equivalent to a 20 watt incandescent bulb.
Jimmie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JIMMIE wrote:

A 25 watt incandescent produces 180-230 lumens, and a 15 watt one produces usually 100-120 lumens. I have yet to see any LED lamps on the market achieving this sort of light output with one watt, though I have seen a lot of claims that I find hard to believe.
================================== Many white LEDs fade at a significant rate with use. Some better high power ones will fade by only 30% in 50,000 hours if they are kept sufficiently cool. Many low power white LEDs will fade 30% or more in 6,000-10,000 hours. I have known one white LED nightlight to fade by about half in about 4,000-4,500 operating hours.
Most red, orange, amberish-yellow, green, blue-green and blue LEDs have good prospect of lasting the 100,000 hours that is widely claimed for life expectancy of LEDs, as long as they are not overdriven and not allowed to overheat.
UV, violet, purple, pink, pastel, and "phosphor yellow" (generally less orangish than "school bus yellow", sometimes a hair greenish) tend to have issues affecting life expectancy - expect 50,000 hours or less from most of these. Many UV ones with epoxy or plastic bodies have UV output fading significantly in mere hundreds of hours at "full power", and many similar violet ones fade significantly in several hundred to a couple thousand hours. Many UV and violet ones with all-inorganic construction are only rated to last 50,000 hours.
Pink, lavendar/purple and other colors depending on phosphors will likely last 50,000 hours optimistically, maybe merely 6,000-10,000 hours.
================================== The 3-LED "C7" Feit Electric unit appears to me likely to last the claimed 50,000 hours or at least get a majority of the way there despite having white low power LEDs. The LEDs in that unit are operated at highly reduced current, maybe about 3.3-3.4 milliamps, about 16.5-17% of the usual 20 milliamp "characterizing current" of most low power LEDs where life expectancy is maybe 6,000-10,000 hours when doing well. 3.3-3.4 milliamps is about 11% of the rated maximum current of most of such LEDs.
The LED nightlight that I found to fade by about half in about 4,000 hours has the LEDs passing current close to 30 mA.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon 27 Apr 2009 07:58:15p, frank1492 told us...

A virtually foolproof solution would be to use a 2-bulb fixture and wire the two sockets in series. Use 2 60-watt bulbs. They will last almost indefinitely and provide sufficient light to be visible to the neighbor.
--
Wayne Boatwright
------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.