Looking for Best LED Flashlight

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General Purpose Survival Flashlight
Let there be light. In cities and towns, we're bathed in light all day. Street lights at night, and all the electrical devices in the house. We take light for granted these days. But in the woods on a dark night, during a power outage, or--most importantly--in a long-term survival situation, you'll quickly learn just how important light is, and how important it is to be prepared.
Here are my opinions about what makes for a good survival light.
First, there is no "one light" that will do every thing. Any more than "one gun" or "one knife". You wil need several.
1. Small and lightweight is better. Except when you need bigger. Indecisive? Naah, just that there are different needs.
A smaller flash light is the one you have with you at all times. A squeeze light on your key ring is there when you need it, or a light to put in your pocket. I carry a 2AA mini mag with LED conversion. It is a compromise between size, convenience, and light output. But, it's with me all day.
Some are bigger due to marketing, or poor design. Many rubber flash lights run on two AA cells, are twice the bulk of a Mini Mag, and don't work as well as the Mini Mag. Bigger flashlights are heavier. They may or may not have longer runtime.
2. Uses a common battery size Currently, the most common flashlight battery sizes are AAA, AA, C, and D cells. A few lights use 9-volt batteries or lithium photo batteries.
That leaves AA- or AAA-cell lights are the most convenient for pocket carry. C and D cells for in the truck. For occasional use when more light power is needed.
Using a common battery size is important for price, and for getting more batteries if you need them. Depending on the scenario, the easiest battery to find at stores is C. You may be able to buy or barter for AA, AAA or D cells. I just don't know about the lithium photo batteries. They may be in stores after a crisis, or may not.
3. Uses a variety of battery types It's important that survival flashlights be able to function whether using carbon, alkaline, or rechargeable batteries. Since you may run out, and need to use whatever you can find. In a long-term survival situation, rechargables and a solar charger may work long after there are no primary cells left. Most lights will function using all three types, though some manufacturers don't approve lithium primaries. Find out exactly what batteries your survival light can tolerate before you purchase it, or test the batteries in your light before you have to rely on them.
4. Fewer batteries is better Obviously, the fewer the batteries needed to operate the light . . . the fewer batteries you'll need to operate the light. This is a good thing in a survival situation, even better for long-term survival. As a rule, a survival light should use no more than two batteries, preferably just one. Currently, there are many one-cell AA lights on the market that not only produce a lot of light (for their size), but also enjoy excellent run times. Twenty-plus hours of usable light is not uncommon, and even longer run times can be found. There are also a few 1xAAA lights available that might make adequate primary or excellent back-up survival lights.
5. Simple to operate There are lots of fancy lights out there that sport multiple output levels, including SOS and strobe modes. Some are even computer-programmable. When it comes to survival lights, simple is usually better. A light with just one medium-intensity level will usually suffice, or perhaps a two-level light with low and high output levels. Just so that it's simple and intuitive to operate.
6. Reliable operation mechanism " Twisty" or "clickie," that is the question. Which is more reliable? There is no definitive answer, reliability depends more on the quality of the light than on the particular mode of operation. And even a good company can turn out the occasional bad light. Most clickies have the on-off mechanism on the rear of the light, while some have it on the side (e.g., Maglite). Most twisties are operated by turning the bezel (head) or tail cap. And there are also hybrid models utilizing both twisty and clickie operations. If at all possible, obtain spare mechanisms.
7. Well constructed Look for lights where the bulb is reasonably protected, that are shock resistant and water resistant/proof, and that won't accidentally turn on while in your pocket or backpack. Clickies are most prone to accidental activation. This can usually be prevented by rotating the tail cap counterclockwise while the light is on until the power cuts out, then clicking the clickie button off.
8. LED versus incandescent No contest here. A flashlight that uses an incandescent bulb is simply not a primary survival light. Period. If the bulb itself can burn out or malfunction due to shock (broken filament), then you don't want to trust your life to its operation. While light emitting diode (LED) "bulbs" technically don't last forever, a 5,000- to 10,000-hour use life is close enough to "forever" for survival purposes. LED bulbs are a heck of a lot tougher than other bulb types. Over the last few years LED technology has improved exponentially, to the point where they now can out-perform most other lights. The newest and brightest LEDs will do what you need. The LEDs put out blue light Many people find this blue objectionable. Some folks are willing to put up with the bluish tint due to its superb runtime (80+ hours of usable light on just 1 AA battery). Not to worry. The newer LEDs have a crisp white white light. Luxeon is like this.
9. Good compromise between output and run time Run time is arguably the most important criterion, and it's what separates true survival lights. The longer the run time, the better. Super-bright "tactical" lights are great for impressing your friends, but will usually suck batteries dry much more quickly. Also, the darker your environment, the less light you need to see well enough. Brighter lights can actually be a disadvantage, because they more readily attract unwanted attention, and can also impair your night vision. Again, we're talking about survival lights here, not tactical (super bright) lights.
It's OK to also take along a super-bright light for "tactical" use (e.g., disorienting or disrupting the night vision of a potential threat), in most cases these lights will not be used very often.
11. Quality of light beam What this refers to is the illumination pattern, or beam characteristic, of the light. For survival lights, you really need both. A wide beam provides light to a wider area, gives a broader picture and better edge vision. Tight beams will light specific objects, and will have longer "throw," but will also tend to draw your line of sight inward, so that you focus more on what's illuminated in the spot. Tight, bright beams are also more detrimental to night vision than wider, dimmer spill beams. But, sometimes you need to see what is that noise, out there. A few lights seek a compromise, claiming to offer both a bright center beam as well as decent spill. If you happen to choose to also carry a more powerful "tactical" light, you'll probably prefer that it have a bright, fairly narrow beam. But for a general purpose survival light, you want a wider, more diffuse beam, allowing you take in more visual information at one time.
12. Lanyard hole The lanyard hole is just that--a hole through which you can attach a lanyard. The lanyard can then be tied around your wrist, for example, or through a belt loop to prevent the loss of your light. Always use a lanyard and secure it to your person, your clothing, or your gear, especially when not in use. Your survival light is an essential, life-saving, possibly irreplaceable tool, but it will do you no good if you lose it.
13. Pocket clip Most smaller lights these days come with pocket clips. They are usually detachable. They are useful to clip the light to a pocket, or hat brim while performing tasks that require both hands. Pocket clips are nice to have. If your light doesn't come with one, it would be worthwhile to find a clip from some other source (such as another light of the same diameter).
14. Can stand on its tail Lights that can do so add a nice feature. They are especially useful when you desire area light, such as when reading or dressing in your tent. Of course, you can always prop your light up or clip it to some thing to get the same effect, but it's not quite as handy.
15. Caring for your light Other than lubing the bezel and/or tail cap threads with an appropriate wet or dry lubricant. Avoiding cross-threading. Put the batteries in, pointing the correct way. Keep it dry, don't drop it, etc. I'd suggest keeping your survival light empty of batteries until needed. Otherwise, keep lithiums in there. Alkalines can leak and ruin your light.
Q: What about headlamps? Can these be used as survival lights? A: Very handy items to have. The light shines right where you look. Including smack dab into the face of the person you're looking at. Maybe it's just me, but I don't much care for light in my eyes when I'm trying to preserve my night vision. They might also make a handy head-shot target for hostiles. Let's put it this way. While most small flashlights can usually be rigged to serve as makeshift headlamps (with the aid of a pocket clip or headband, for example), most headlamps cannot readily be used in the same manner as one might use a flashlight. Headlamps could possibly serve as back-up survival lights (if they use only one or two batteries), but I would not recommend them as primary survival lights. A flashlight will, in most instances, prove more versatile. Resources
1. The best flashlight resource on the Web is Candle Power Forums . Lots of traffic and more info about flashlights than most people would ever need to know. Also a good source for obtaining custom lights. 2. One of the better flashlight review sites is FlashlightReviews.com. It's no longer updated regularly, but many of the lights still being sold are reviewed at the site.
if you decide to transition to LEDs, save those original incandescent light bulb components. You never know when someday you may need a lot of light--for example for impromptu surgery out in the field.
The other exception is truly SHTF tactical use. While I do not advocate using a visible light flashlight or rail-mounted weapon light where you are up against and armed opponent. (Since they provide your opponent with a convenient point of aim.) They are fine for shooting marauding bears.
I also keep a 50 piece box of the standard Panasonic brand CR-123 lithium batteries in my refrigerator, as a "tactical reserve." These have a 10+ year shelf life.
Regarding lanyards, I recommend using a long, stout lanyard that is a full loop, preferably with a ball-shaped spring button slider. I mainly use olive drab paracord. The longer the better, for the sake of versatility. If the lanyard is too short, then there is not enough slack to loop the flashlight through (in a Girth Hitch--a.k.a. Lanyard Knot) to be able to hang a light from a branch, belt loop, tent d-ring, or other object.
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Subject: Flashlights for every purpose Date: Monday, October 20, 2008 9:05 PM
Please be sure to add any I missed.
Photon squeeze light. Carry on keyring for occasional light needs. Like when you drop your mini mag outdoors at night.
Mag or Garrity 3 or 4 D cell light. Slice the night. Read house numbers. Beat off muggers and burglars. See what is that noise in your chicken coop.
Tactical Xenon light. Expensive light with expensive bulbs and expensive batteries. But it does a terrific job of lighting house numbers for night service calls. Also good for spotting racoon in trees. Actually small enough to put in pocket.
Closet light. Runs on D cells, some run on AA cells. Can be fluorescent, filament bulb, or LED. Stationary applications, for short term light. Many closet lights are bright enough to light up an entire room enough to walk around.
Camping lantern. I have one which is fluorescent and runs on D cells. But doesn't work when it is cold. LED, or filament bulbs work when cold.
Dorcy single AAA LED light. Fits nicely in the coat pocket, and provides light when everything else is broken.
Spotlight that plugs into the lighter socket. Light up the entire side of the house. Make burglars go into V-fib. Spook the horses. Signal alien space ships, and confuse airplane pilots. A bit too bright, some of them. And plenty fun to play with.
Mini Mag light. My daily work horse. Use it several times a day, every day. Nite Ize and Terralux conversions are an excellent idea.
Headlamp. Used when working, so as to keep both hands free.
I'm Christopher Young and I approved this message. . .
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On Thu, 15 Oct 2009 08:47:04 -0400, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Had something like that with a squeezy thing for the switch - the squeezy bit wore out very quickly. Not impressed.

Similiarly unimpressed with my 3-cell LED Mag; light output is crap. My 2-cell Mag with a conventional bulb is just awesome, though. Only issue I have is that there's no provision for a strap so it can be hung from things - I'm tempted to see if I can drill the base and add a small eye-bolt.

Had some of those, too (3xAA, incandescent). Utter shit. They never made it as far as the closets, and I don't know what I even did with them now :-)

I have a big ol' oil lamp for that, and so far have managed not to burn the tent down ;)

Talking of which, I had a homebrew lamp made from a car headlight grafted onto the body of a cordless drill - it gave a huge amount of light and would run for quite a long time (just less useful for 'distance' work). I finally killed the battery in it though, so it went the way of the dodo :-(
cheers
Jules
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Had something like that with a squeezy thing for the switch - the squeezy bit wore out very quickly. Not impressed.
CY: You can get em on Ebay, in quantity down near about a buck each, post paid.

Similiarly unimpressed with my 3-cell LED Mag; light output is crap.
CY: The base is an electrical connection. Screw the butt cap off, slightly sand the end of the tube, and where the end of the tube matches the butt cap. Sometimes they over anodize the tubes or butt caps.
My 2-cell Mag with a conventional bulb is just awesome, though. Only issue I have is that there's no provision for a strap so it can be hung from things - I'm tempted to see if I can drill the base and add a small eye-bolt.
CY: They do make belt holders. You can get the belt loop, and drywall screw the belt loop to the wall. The eyebolt should work fine. Take the spare bulb out, drill, thread, and put a nut on the inside of the cap. Might not have enough space for the spare bulb, then.

Had some of those, too (3xAA, incandescent). Utter shit. They never made it as far as the closets, and I don't know what I even did with them now :-)
CY: I'm with you. Garbage, most of them.

I have a big ol' oil lamp for that, and so far have managed not to burn the tent down ;)
CY: You da man!

Talking of which, I had a homebrew lamp made from a car headlight grafted onto the body of a cordless drill - it gave a huge amount of light and would run for quite a long time (just less useful for 'distance' work). I finally killed the battery in it though, so it went the way of the dodo :-(
CY: Now, that's frieking brilliant (no joke). Very clever idea. And the 12 volt battery would be rechargable. I had a six volt hand held spotlamp, the gel cell battery went dead. Wired it to alkaline lantern battery, and works fine again. Carbon lantern battery did not provide enough power.
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On Thu, 15 Oct 2009 14:53:27 -0400, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Think I got mine free with something, so no big deal, but I wouldn't pay for one...

Hmm, just tried, doesn't seem to be any different - but then it's still daylight here and the issue only really showed up in pitch black larger spaces compared to my other Mag.
Seems that the LED is a little module, so I might be able to just drop a 4.5V incandescent in there... (I don't like the blueish colour of the light anyway, as it seems to make shadows too strong at night)

Hmm, I'll take a look (assuming they hold the light with the bright end pointing downward, which I think would be more useful - hang it from a nail on the wall etc. while doing stuff)

If the 3-cell's anything to go by (my 2-cell's up in the 'shop and it's snowing and I'm lazy ;) then there should be space I think. I imagine they're the same base design.

Sentimental reasons - it was my grandfathers. Spent ages as a kid stripping it down, patching the holes in the tank and respraying it. Then I bust the glass and it took another few years before I stumbled across another basket-case donor in the same style. The wick came from the strap from some ancient cloth bag or other :-)

Yeah, I decided I loathed cordless power tools, plus I was looking for a nice little compact motor for some robotics project at the time, so killing the drill was a no-brainer. I had some spare round headlights from classic car shenanigans, and it took hardly any time to mate one up to the body of the drill. I was doing a whole pile of urban exploration stuff and the like at the time, so it came in handy - amazed I never bust the glass front on the headlight, though!
Nice thing about it was that it'd gradually dim when the battery was going flat; I had one of those 10,000 candle-power lamps and that'd go from bright to dead within only a few seconds - and it's often useful to have a bit more warning when your main light's about to crap out on you :-)

That works :-)
cheers
Jules
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Hmm, just tried, doesn't seem to be any different - but then it's still daylight here and the issue only really showed up in pitch black larger spaces compared to my other Mag.
CY: That's odd. I really love my LED 3D mag.
Seems that the LED is a little module, so I might be able to just drop a 4.5V incandescent in there... (I don't like the blueish colour of the light anyway, as it seems to make shadows too strong at night)
CY: Yes, you should be able to use a three cell filament bulb. Should work fine. And yes, the filament bulbs are much more white.

Hmm, I'll take a look (assuming they hold the light with the bright end pointing downward, which I think would be more useful - hang it from a nail on the wall etc. while doing stuff)
CY: No, the belt holders all do lens up. You're back to the screw eye idea.

If the 3-cell's anything to go by (my 2-cell's up in the 'shop and it's snowing and I'm lazy ;) then there should be space I think. I imagine they're the same base design.
CY: I'm sure they are the same tail caps. Plenty of space.

Sentimental reasons - it was my grandfathers. Spent ages as a kid stripping it down, patching the holes in the tank and respraying it. Then I bust the glass and it took another few years before I stumbled across another basket-case donor in the same style. The wick came from the strap from some ancient cloth bag or other :-)
CY: I also have my father's old oil lamp. Glass base from a garage sale for 50 cents, and the globe from a hardware store. I had to replace the wick. Glad you are able to keep the lamp in the family. Traditions like that are priceless.

Yeah, I decided I loathed cordless power tools, plus I was looking for a nice little compact motor for some robotics project at the time, so killing the drill was a no-brainer. I had some spare round headlights from classic car shenanigans, and it took hardly any time to mate one up to the body of the drill. I was doing a whole pile of urban exploration stuff and the like at the time, so it came in handy - amazed I never bust the glass front on the headlight, though!
CY: That sounds totally useful. I can imagine using battery jumper pack and a hand held spot light to do much the same. But, yours has the home built edge.
Nice thing about it was that it'd gradually dim when the battery was going flat; I had one of those 10,000 candle-power lamps and that'd go from bright to dead within only a few seconds - and it's often useful to have a bit more warning when your main light's about to crap out on you :-)
CY: Warning is good. I met a power company guy who said he used to go into sub basements with one lamp, that having a filament bulb,a nd no spare light in his pocket. I don't have that kind of courage.

That works :-)
cheers
CY: Nice to meet a fellow flash light person.
Jules
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Several Survival Flashlight
Let there be light. In cities and towns, we're bathed in light all day. Street lights at night, and all the electrical devices in the house. We take light for granted these days. But in the woods on a dark night, during a power outage, or--most importantly--in a long-term survival situation, you'll quickly learn just how important light is, and how important it is to be prepared.
Here are my opinions about what makes for a good survival light.
First, there is no "one light" that will do every thing. Any more than "one gun" or "one knife". You wil need several.
I propose that the following list of lights will do most of the jobs a survivalist needs.
1. Pocket light.
A smaller flash light is the one you have with you at all times. A squeeze light on your key ring is there when you need it, or a light to put in your pocket. I carry a 2AA mini mag with LED conversion. It is a compromise between size, convenience, and light output. But, it's with me all day.
Some are bigger due to marketing, or poor design. Many rubber flash lights run on two AA cells, are twice the bulk of a Mini Mag, and don't work as well as the Mini Mag. Bigger flashlights are heavier. They may or may not have longer runtime.
2. Distance light.
When you're trying to figure out what is that noise on the far side of the field, you need a bright light that shines at a distance. I've found few lights that are better than a 4D cell Mag light with a Krypton bulb. Until they came out with the Mag light with the LED bulb, that is. The Garrity LED bulb is no where near as bright as the LED original equipment bulb.
3. Area light
When you'r eating dinner, or walking down a trail, or walking around the living room. It's not convenient to hold a flashlight in one hand (or between your ear and your shoulder) while you use two hands to cut and eat your food. At t his moment, an area light is what's needed. I like the fluorescent camping lanterns from Walmart, that run on 4 D cells. These lights don't work well in cold weather, which is when the Jeep lights come in handy. 20 LED bulbs, and runs on 3D cells. Not as bright as the fluorescent lantern, but it does work when it's cold.
Uses a common battery size Currently, the most common flashlight battery sizes are AAA, AA, C, and D cells. A few lights use 9-volt batteries or lithium photo batteries.
That leaves AA- or AAA-cell lights are the most convenient for pocket carry. C and D cells for in the truck. For occasional use when more light power is needed.
Using a common battery size is important for price, and for getting more batteries if you need them. Depending on the scenario, the easiest battery to find at stores is C. You may be able to buy or barter for AA, AAA or D cells. I just don't know about the lithium photo batteries. They may be in stores after a crisis, or may not.
7. Well constructed Look for lights where the bulb is reasonably protected, that are shock resistant and water resistant/proof, and that won't accidentally turn on while in your pocket or backpack. Clickies are most prone to accidental activation. This can usually be prevented by rotating the tail cap counterclockwise while the light is on until the power cuts out, then clicking the clickie button off.
8. LED versus incandescent No contest here. A flashlight that uses an incandescent bulb is simply not a primary survival light. Period. If the bulb itself can burn out or malfunction due to shock (broken filament), then you don't want to trust your life to its operation. While light emitting diode (LED) "bulbs" technically don't last forever, a 5,000- to 10,000-hour use life is close enough to "forever" for survival purposes. LED bulbs are a heck of a lot tougher than other bulb types. Over the last few years LED technology has improved exponentially, to the point where they now can out-perform most other lights. The newest and brightest LEDs will do what you need. The LEDs put out blue light Many people find this blue objectionable. Some folks are willing to put up with the bluish tint due to its superb runtime (80+ hours of usable light on just 1 AA battery). Not to worry. The newer LEDs have a crisp white white light. Luxeon is like this.
9. Good compromise between output and run time Run time is arguably the most important criterion, and it's what separates true survival lights. The longer the run time, the better. Super-bright "tactical" lights are great for impressing your friends, but will usually suck batteries dry much more quickly. Also, the darker your environment, the less light you need to see well enough. Brighter lights can actually be a disadvantage, because they more readily attract unwanted attention, and can also impair your night vision. Again, we're talking about survival lights here, not tactical (super bright) lights.
It's OK to also take along a super-bright light for "tactical" use (e.g., disorienting or disrupting the night vision of a potential threat), in most cases these lights will not be used very often.
Q: What about headlamps? Can these be used as survival lights? A: Very handy items to have. The light shines right where you look. Including smack dab into the face of the person you're looking at. Maybe it's just me, but I don't much care for light in my eyes when I'm trying to preserve my night vision. They might also make a handy head-shot target for hostiles. Let's put it this way. While most small flashlights can usually be rigged to serve as makeshift headlamps (with the aid of a pocket clip or headband, for example), most headlamps cannot readily be used in the same manner as one might use a flashlight. Headlamps could possibly serve as back-up survival lights (if they use only one or two batteries), but I would not recommend them as primary survival lights. A flashlight will, in most instances, prove more versatile. Resources
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I may be looking for something more than many of you think. (Thanks so much for your ideas.) To clarify, this is the light that caught my attention: http://www.rei.com/product/793941 Not really looking to spend quite that much, but this is in the league, power-wise. I thought it would be good to use in an emergency on my boat if I got caught in darkness. (Rare but could happen.) Frank
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Battery use is quite less with Led, last winter I bought about 10 cheap and one good HD led flashlights, I keep them everywhere but only have changed batteries in a few of them, For a boat and ocasional use recharageables go dead in less than 1 year, alkalines can sit for 3-5 years and still work in Led lights, I would only want recharageable lights if I used them at least weekly, Ive been the recharageable light rout for 15 years, mine are usualy dead when I need them. Leds fire on much less current then regular bulbs, even my super bright Led bike light used daily still has the same batteries I got for it in maybe June, try a 25$ 3w-100 lumen alkaline powered flashlight, you will be suprised. Even the cheap .25 w lights are only about 1.25$ each at HD, I have them everywhere even my jackets.
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For boat use I would look for something waterproof, I doubt either the Task Force or a bicycle headlight would be suitable. The Task Force you might be able to make waterproof by greasing all the O-rings but you'd still have to deal with the switch (in the tail of the light.)
A bicycle headlight is generally water resistant, not fully waterproof. Many I've seen have weep holes at the bottom when they're mounted in the intended orientation, so rain wouldn't hurt them but immersion would probably kill them.
Mag-lites are supposed to be waterproof but I was not impressed with the light output or beam pattern of my LED mag-lite compared to the Task Force (I had the Mag first, so I didn't know what I was missing,) and it was unwieldy and heavy in comparison.
I think I'd be looking for a higher-end Cree 3W or higher LED flashlight, one of the "tactical" models for ruggedness and waterproofing.
nate

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frank1492 wrote:

Might be a great light, but it is built for a bicycle, gives no idea about light output, and is pricey for your needs.
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Frank wrote:

It SAYS, under "Specs"
1 LED 110 Lumens
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HeyBub wrote:

Missed that. I was looking at laundry list on page. All lights should be required to put lumens on the package. That's how I shop for incandescents and cfi's.
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My take is that 110 lumens is produced by the LED (maybe optimistically) if given "full power" according to nominal design of the system or a "characterizing current" of the LED (or worse still is maximum available from the LED) when the LED is cooled to having either its heatsinkable surface or the hottest part of its semiconductor chip at 25 degrees C (77 degrees F).
(Thankfully, the Seoul Semiconductor LED that I consider most likely to put in a bicycle headlight has its "upper grade" version supposedly producing minimum of 100 lumens at 350 milliamps IIRC - very good actually.)
Lumens produced by the LED do not all make it out of the lighting unit. Reflectors are not perfectively reflective, and absorb some of the light. Lenses reflect some of the light backwards, and the light reflected backwards by a lens is usually mostly either absorbed or ending up going somewhere other than where you want the light.
Maybe this bicycle light, shone upwards at a ceiling painted with brightest white paint, will illuminate a room as well as a 110 lumen lightbulb (typical of many 15 watt 120V ones) does. But I would not count on that, not even from a $129 bicycle headlight - even though it would kick kiesters and tookuses as far as bicicle headlights go if 75 lumens usually came out from it.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Thank you all again for your comments. I have saved them all and will study them before making my decision. I'm sorry I don't have the energy to comment on each of them. I do think Streamlights and Fenixes are in the category I am looking for. A good review of the best lights is: http://www.metaefficient.com/flashlights/best-flashlights-reviews-top-rated.html I think I am prepared to pay $100 for a really good light, even though that may be overkill, because they fascinate me with their power. A couple have lumens in the 700 range! I already have a light in the category of the Lowes light, by the way. I will look for your further recommendations and again thank you all for taking the trouble to help me! Frank
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frank1492 wrote:

Hi, You can use rechargeable batteries on flash lights, real police or military models are very rugged, water proof and will last LONG time. Look around on the eBay.
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frank1492 wrote:

Unsurpassed light/price ratio on this from Harbor Freight
http://crimsondevotchka.files.wordpress.com/2006/12/060613-cat-bear_big.jpg
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Was that the link you planned? Shows a bear cub in a tree, and a yellow cat on the ground.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

No, drat. That link was for another group commenting on bear hunters shooting treed bears.
Here's the Harbor Freight coupon. Matter of fact, I got a free flashlight today.
http://www.ifcba.com/images/htf/65458/coupon22.html
[If this link turns out to be for a broccoli coring machine, let me know.]
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That's a seriously good coupon. Says it may not be duplicated in any way including computer print outs. But, I doubt the store people will notice?
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