Looking for Best LED Flashlight

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Should have Li-Ion battery, with good life, and be rechargeable. Saw a nice bike light, but would like this to be hand-held. Would prefer flood to spot, high lumen. Recos much appreciated. Thank you! Frank
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wrote:

I don't know what's best but this one has a hand crank so that you can charge it or your cell phone by hand.
http://www.mypreciouskid.com/led-flashlight.html
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My experience with hand-crank flashlights is that they tend to have three low-power LEDs.
The flashlight here is said to have "3 Mega Bright LED's providing over 100,000 hours of light". I still suspect 3 low power LEDs.
This flashlight appears to me to be good for an emergency flashlight, as in a light that works as long as your arms and hands are functional. The usual 3-LED hand-crank flashlights do not produce a lot of light, and I do not recommend them as primary lights for night hiking or as first choice for working on anything in the dark.
======================================= One more thing: Most low power white LEDs, at full power, are significantly faded at 10,000 operating hours, sometimes 4,000-6,000 operating hours. 100,000 hours is merely a widely-repeated number for life expectancy of LEDs, and it is actually true of most colored ones. White ones and a few others are different by having a phosphor that is faded by the extremely intense light at the surface of the LED chip.
Better high power white LEDs are claimed by their manufacturers to fade by no more than 30% in 50,000 hours, provided specific temperature limits for 50,000 hour life expectancy (which are cooler than maximum-allowable) are not exceeded. 50,000 hour life expectancy may require use of not exceeding a magnitude of current at which the LED's chaeracteristics are all "characterized", which may be less than the rated maximum.
======================================= As for an emergency flashlight - avoid rechargeable batteries here. If you want a good flashlight with rechargeable batteries and an "emergency flashlight", then you want at least two flashlights. Rechargeable batteries self-discharge faster than non-rechargeable batteries, and they age faster if they are constantly maintained at topped-off-full-charge (and also if they are allowed to over-discharge).
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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My experience with hand-crank flashlights is that they tend to have three low-power LEDs.
The flashlight here is said to have "3 Mega Bright LED's providing over 100,000 hours of light". I still suspect 3 low power LEDs.
CY: Twenty bucks, too. The cell charger is useful. I've seen crank flash lights in the 5 to 8 dollar range, and probably worth about that much.
This flashlight appears to me to be good for an emergency flashlight, as in a light that works as long as your arms and hands are functional. The usual 3-LED hand-crank flashlights do not produce a lot of light, and I do not recommend them as primary lights for night hiking or as first choice for working on anything in the dark.
CY: Too much noise. Crank up flash lights (might, maybe) be good for remote location where you only vacation once a year. If the internal nicads don't go bad on you.
======================================= One more thing: Most low power white LEDs, at full power, are significantly faded at 10,000 operating hours, sometimes 4,000-6,000 operating hours. 100,000 hours is merely a widely-repeated number for life expectancy of LEDs, and it is actually true of most colored ones. White ones and a few others are different by having a phosphor that is faded by the extremely intense light at the surface of the LED chip.
Better high power white LEDs are claimed by their manufacturers to fade by no more than 30% in 50,000 hours, provided specific temperature limits for 50,000 hour life expectancy (which are cooler than maximum-allowable) are not exceeded. 50,000 hour life expectancy may require use of not exceeding a magnitude of current at which the LED's chaeracteristics are all "characterized", which may be less than the rated maximum.
CY: More ad hype?
======================================= As for an emergency flashlight - avoid rechargeable batteries here. If you want a good flashlight with rechargeable batteries and an "emergency flashlight", then you want at least two flashlights. Rechargeable batteries self-discharge faster than non-rechargeable batteries, and they age faster if they are constantly maintained at topped-off-full-charge (and also if they are allowed to over-discharge).
CY: For emergency light, I'd want something with alkalines. And buy a new set of batteries each year, if they need it or not.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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www.ledlenser.com has a big lineup, HD carries a few of them I just got one that is 2.2 watts with 3 aaa batteries. Recharagable? get recharageable batteries but if you dont use it much the batteries will be dead when you need it and alkaline last a long time in Led lights. Li ion battieies, will cost more than a flashlight.
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frank1492 wrote:

I have a 3 watt Cree, believe it is called, from Lowes, although not sure it is still there. Uses 2 C batteries but I guess you could use rechargables. Cost $30. Rated output is something like 170 lumens. All the multi led's I've seen are OK for close use but are anemic on light output.
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Cree is the name of the led bulb, they are bright, Ledlenser has one with 7 Cree leds, it sells for something like 400$
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ransley wrote:

Yes, I would look for the led and look for watt, candlepower or lumen output. I bought a 12 led lantern for my wife's use during power failures and it does not even give off enough light to read by. She bought me one with 20 leds focused in one direction and you can read by it. I have several other led lights and, as I said, they are adequate for close work. What I really like about led's is that they get much more effective power out of a battery.
My main use is hunting and just this week I was out at 5am in an area I was somewhat familiar with but needed a light to find the public stand and the Lowes light was great illuminating trail markers 200 yards away.
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The crank up lights with the silver "tornado funnel" in the middle, I find them to be useless. The crank is noisy, and the light spreads on a single plane, hardly lights the room.
Kmart has a "Jeep light" with 10 or 20 LED, and three D cells in the base. Looks like a creature from STar Wars. I've got a couple of these, and really like them. Long run tme on D cells. and you can point it to the ceiling, to light the entire room. These work nicely when it's bitter cold.
For area light, my favorite is the Ozark Trail fluorescent camping lantern from Walmart. Ten bucks, and takes four D cells. Hang from the ceiling, and light the entire room. Walmart also has fluorescent "closet lights" in the hardware section which are very good. Fluorescents do not work when it's cold.
The round "tap lights" are OK for finding the bathroom at night, but not much more than that. They have either LED or filament bulb types.
Pocket carry. For me, the minimag with LED conversion is good. Nite Ize makes a convesion for $4.97 at Walmart. I went with the Teralux for $25 and very pleased with it.
Harbor Feight has a 15 LED light that takes three D cells. Very blue light, and very short range. It has its uses, indoors, but I'e never bring it camping.
Mag makes a LED 2D through 4D light with the mag brand LED bulb. I got a couple 3D, when Lowes had them on sale. They are super bright, and the batteries last a long time. Brighter than my Garrity light that had 3D cells. I even swapped out the batteries on the Garrity, I thought the batteries were low, the Garrity was so dim compared to the Mag LED.
Garrity LED bulb from Walmart, replaces 2D through 6D bulbs. Blue light, dim, not worth the cost of the bulb. Turns a good flash light into a nightlight.
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<SNIP previously quoted material>

Watts are a unit of power consumption - and that can be either actual (either taken from the batteires or delivered to the LED, 2 different things) or the maximum that the LED is allowed to have dumped into it. (How much extra by driver circuitry or dropping resistors varies widely.)
Since this means there are already three different things that wattage can refer to, and efficiency of LEDs varies widely, wattage has only "fair" correlation to light output.
Candela is the intensity of the beam, and roughly means "beam candlepower". This refers to intensity of a beam in the distance, and decreasing area of the beam covered gets this to increase when lumens are unchaged.
Lumens may be what the LED is rated to produce, and in that case is often at some specific high amount of current, and also in that case is usually specified at some non-real-world level of cooling the LED, either cooling its heatsinkable surface to 25 degrees C (77 degrees F) or worse-still cooling the "junction" (within the LED's chip) to 25 degrees C (77 degrees F).

I do agree that LEDs tend to be better for flashlights than incandescent lamps. Modern LEDs are finally mostly more efficient than incandescents, many times by a substantial difference, and - unlike incandescents - they do not lose energy efficiency much (or at all) when power input is reduced.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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The LED I've used have all been short range light. The Mag original LED bulbs are the one exception.
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http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId"5285-50584-FT-NS-2C%203WATT&lpage=none
This is my light although they say only brightness of 100 but don't give units. Whatever, this is the brightest light that I have including other leds and incandescents.
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For thirty bucks, that's a bit pricey. But, I guess the LED Mag lights are up around thirty bucks.
It sounds like a good combination of factors. Small enough for short term pocket carry, if needed. Belt sheath provided. Bright enough to be useful.
C cells are likely to be at the stores long after the other sizes sell out.
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3w is bright for a Led , the 100 would be lumen which is bright for a focused flashlight beam.
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ransley wrote:

Originally it was listed at, I believe 170 lumens, but last time I looked it was not at their website. Whatever, it is the best and brightest flashlight I have and when I was looking for something like it, it was best price.
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frank1492 wrote:

My do all light is a single cell with a CREE lamp. I wanted a small form factor. I have a belt holster for it and also a velcro mount for the bike. It gets used a lot and has excellent battery life because it has variable intensity. The pattern is also really good for biking. The lowest intensity is brighter than the full output of a big box quality light.
http://www.fenixlight.com/flashlight/fenixp2d.htm
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I like the variable output offered, but on output you are wrong, you can easily find 100 lumen-3watt Cree Led lights at box stores, sure they cost maybe 30$, but output more than Fenix.
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ransley wrote:

The only lights I have ever seen in big box places are total junk. Usually they seem to offer lights with multiple cheap LEDs etc.
The particular model I have has 175 lumen output on high and 100 lumen on the third setting from the bottom so maybe you misread the specs.
The variable output is fantastic. You really get a very long battery life because I find if I need to use it for long periods of time such as biking I really don't need full intensity.
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Rather than sticking exactly to your specs, I'll tell you what I have - Lowe's sells a 3W LED "Task Force" flashlight that is excellent. Much brighter than my slightly older LED Mag-Lite and much smaller and lighter. Takes two C-cells. I actually use one as a secondary bicycle headlight, I use rechargeable NiMH C-cells with it and it'll last at least 6 hours or so on a charge (longest I've let it go, it was still bright) it's strapped to the handlebars of my touring bike with a Twofish mounting block. I also got a collimator from DealExtreme that changes the beam pattern from a spot pattern to a horizontal line - neither is optimal but the horizontal pattern keeps me from blinding traffic. It's actually noticeably brighter than my Lumotec halogen headlight that is driven from a dynohub, but I'm saving up for a B&M IQ Cyo to replace the Lumotec. Anyway, the Lumotec and the Task Force together provide enough light for me to ride on even completely unlit roads well after dark. I'm not a racer type but I don't ride slowly either.
I like the Task Force so much I bought another one that I keep next to the front door (still with the included alkaline batteries in it) so if I come home and the power is out I just use that to see. No need for candles except in the case of a very extended power failure. It cost about $30 apiece when I bought mine last year.
http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId=225285-50584-FT-NS-2C+3WATT
nate
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I can think of several different reasons for having a light. If you search the archives of alt.survival you will find that I've posted a bit too much, on the subject.
We're just guessing, at this point. We don't know what your intended purpose is. Do you want a pocket size light? Belt sheath light? Tool box light for big light needs? Task light, or area light? Close up, or seeing at a distance? Do you want to light up an entire room? Blind attackers? See a racoon in a tree at night? Read books? Light to walk around a room?
Each of these tasks will take a different light.
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