Looking for a better way........suggestions?

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How do I fix this problem?
I have a concrete drive. One section of it (approx. 12' x 16') is PERFECTLY level around the perimeter, but sags a little in the center, which holds water. This means that when it rains it holds water in the whole section. Yes, whoever installed it didn't do a very good job.
I thought about drilling a hole in hopes it would drain this section, but I assume it would clog up in short order. I thought about cutting out a trough to let the water escape, but think this would look tacky. I don't want to go to the expense of replacing the section. Replacing the section would be a different color and look like shit. The driveway is about 200 ft long which would totally be out of my range for replacing the whole drive way.
Got any suggestions?
TIA
Hank
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On Tue, 29 Dec 2009 04:46:25 -0800 (PST), "Hustlin' Hank"

Either replace the whole driveway, or accept that whatever you do will involve a compromise. If you live where it never freezes, you could probably scarify the surface and apply a leveling layer. If the mismatch bothers you, you could then dye the whole driveway to make it less noticable.
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I'm sure the problem has occured, before. I'd get out the phone book and look under masons, or driveway and paving companies. Someone out there has to have answer. Who knows. Maybe one of the companies near you has a cement borehole drill, and can cut a nice hole, to make a drain.
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On Dec 29, 9:35 am, "Stormin Mormon"

The driveway must have control joints in it now. How would another control joint located at the middle of the low spot look? If you make the cut through the concrete, maybe fill it with some sand, it would give the water a place to drain. Of course it depends on how much water pools and how fast you want it to be gone. If it's just a small pool, it might work.
There are also channel drains available, starting at about 3" wide that can withstand vehicle traffic, come with various color grates and would look OK. Of course, that will only work if there is somewhere convenient for the water to drain. Google NDS channel drains for info.
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On Tue, 29 Dec 2009 09:35:23 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

That will work if the base is well drained - otherwize it will make a REAL repair necessary within a year when the frost heaves the whole thing.
If you choose to do this, the BORG rents big hammer-drills and core bits which will make short work of installing up to a 4 1/2" drain. At least up here that's the biggest they carry.
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In our area there is a specialist outfit called 'SlabJackers' who deal with problems like yours by boring/cutting the slab and pumping concrete under it under pressure. Check your Yellow Pages for a similar firm and discuss the options with them. It appears that the original pour was not done over a properly compacted base, so from a practical standpoint it would make sense to remove and redo it. Some research should give you the name of the concrete supplier, and odds are that a repour would match perfectly well after a year or two in the weather. In fact, after a month you likely wouldn't be bothered by the slight difference that much as you watch the rainwater going where it should.
Joe
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operating the power trowel just not paying attention and working the center low?????
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The guy who built the house I bought was a concrete contractor. I had to cut drains from THREE ponds he created in large patches of concrete. I thought 1" in 10" was standard slope for anything. I know it would be nice to have really level, but one of the pools was inside my garage, and I would have at least put a minimal slope in there, or cut vees for drainage. But no, he didn't. Just because these people can do things, or are even licensed doesn't mean all the bubbas and julios who show up to do the work on any given day know what they are doing.
Steve
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Hustlin' Hank wrote:

Replace whole section or mud jacking.
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If it was me, and it ain't, so I don't have a clue what you are going to do........
I have the same problem at a couple of areas. I just cut some grooves, and cut them so it looks like they are expansion cuts, and it drains fine now. Cut them only about 1/4" deep. Use a straight edge to make it look nice. If it does crack, that will only hasten draining. You may only have to cut half the section to get the pond to drain. Fill it with water from the hose, identify the pond, then make a few cuts, and yer good to go. Yes, it may fill up with dirt, but it will still drain. And the grooves will be easy to clean with a hose sprayer.
Werks for me.
Steve
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wrote:

joints UNLESS it is the end section. I doubt the concrete would flex enough to raise the centre enough to drain without raising one or more edges. - or cracking the concrete.
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Ditto that. You'd end up with more cracks.
Steve
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Thanks guys. Here's what I am going to do: I am going to cut a groove with a saw and see how that works out. If it doesn't drain it, I will then cut another groove 4 - 6" (or slightly wider than a paver) from the first and remove the concrete and fill with gravel and top with pavers.
Also, I think the person who was operating the bull float over floated it. Thereby moving the concrete from the center to the edge. If I had to guess, he would rather float it than get down on his knees and finish it. He looked busy so the other guys thought he was too busy.
Hank
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Hank. When I cut one for my major pond, I 45'ed the blade and made one cut 1/4" deep. Then I went the other way, and using the blade, hogged out the other half of the 45, leaving a groove. It works fine, and doesn't tend to clog up. You just have to use a piece of plywood or something someone can stand on and not move for your saw edge guide to get a straight cut for both cuts.
Steve
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Good idea.....thanks!
Hank
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If the slab was level in the beginning, it can be returned to its level profile without much concern. You should find a experienced mudjacker in your area and the repair should start at the lowest point and work outwards gradually lifting to a suspended taut string line. Ideally, you should use sandjacking to avoid the cracking, but you probably don't have a sandjacker in your area. chuck
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Hustlin' Hank wrote:

EJ in NJ
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Try drilling a small hole or two.
My garage floor holds water in a shallow puddle so I drilled a 5/16th inch hole. It drained fine for that winter. Next winter the hole was plugged so I cleaned it out with the same drill bit. Seems like I need to re- drill/clean it once a year. I found a $12 hammer drill on sale and paid about $20 for a 9-inch concrete bit. As many times as this hole is going to be drilled cheap tools are fine. The cleaning out drilling only takes a few seconds.
You could drill as many holes as needed to drain all of the low spots. Keep the bit. Even if you need to clean it out several times a year that's a lot cheaper than the options.
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Hustlin' Hank wrote:

Driveway French Drain:
Rent a concrete hole-maker (they use them for installing in-floor safes, posts, whatever). Your local tool rental shop can advise you.
Once through the concrete, use a post-hole digger and excavate as deep a hole as you can.
Fill the hole with gravel. Slap a drain-cover on the top.
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re: "Driveway French Drain"
Actually, I think that would be closer to a Dry Well than a French Drain, since it's vertical, not horizontal but the concept works.
I did almost the same thing, except that I did it *next* to my driveway, right at the edge of the lawn.
I had a low spot in my asphalt driveway that collected water whenever it rained or we washed a car, etc.
I went as deep as I could with a post hole digger, then got out the shop vac, borrowed a few extension tubes and went a couple of feet deeper. (sandy soil, pretty easy to scrap and suck out)
I put some gravel at the bottom, dropped a length of 4" PVC pipe down the hole and put one of these on top, level with the lawn:
http://www.cachingbox.com/images/uploads/052063400136md.jpg
I figure it holds about 4 - 5 gallons of water which, if nothing else, clears the puddle sooner than without it.
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