Long closet pole

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RicodJour wrote:

Is that an African or European closet pole?
--
Cheers, Bev
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The Real Bev wrote:

I don't know that. ARGGGGHHH! ;)
R
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On 13-Mar-2006, snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

You have to brace the channel for the same reason that you brace a floor joist. It isn't a matter of unsymmetric loading - at some load level, it can rotate out of plane spontaneously; that's what instability is all about. Once any instability starts, a channel section will rotate easily - they don't carry torsional loads like a closed section. That's why the manual has the load reduction factor.
Mike
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Michael Daly wrote:

Indeed. Unfortunately I'm not sure if Nick will see the obvious validity in your concise response as you didn't include lots of calculations. Sad, but true.
As a minor nitpick, spontaneously connotes without external influence, which isn't exactly the case with a loaded rod.
R
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Then again, bodies at rest tend to stay at rest :-) You might calculate how much perturbation is required to make it unstable as a function of loading, if that floats your boat...
Nick
When we play tennis or walk downstairs we are actually solving whole pages of differential equations, quickly, easily and without thinking about it, using the analogue computer which we keep in our minds. What we find difficult about mathematics is the formal, symbolic presentation of the subject by pedagogues with a taste for dogma, sadism and incomprehensible squiggles.
from Structures: Why Things Don't Fall Down, by J. E. Gordon
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On 14-Mar-2006, snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

Perhaps, instead, you should learn something about structural stability. If you had not slept through those classes, you'd know that no perturbation is required.
Mike
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You are correct, in the quantum-mechanical sense, but don't hold your breath.
Nick
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On 14-Mar-2006, snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

Quantum mechanics has nothing to do with it. Stop being such a twit. The requirements for bracing are based on solid structural engineering principles backed by considerable experimental and practical evidence. Load reduction requirements for reduced bracing are based on the same.
Mike
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Clue: Nick is like a mathematical formula. He has wonderful theoretical concepts, but you will NEVER get him to admit he is wrong. I tried that over ten years ago, and for ten years I've been needling him about the difference between theory and real world.
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Clearly you need another hobby.
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snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

One definition of pertubation: 1. A small change in a physical system.
If you've ever seen an overloaded closet rod with a big sway in its back, you'd realize that people jam in as much clothes as the space will allow. The small change, like squeezing in some new purchases, doesn't set off a strain alarm.
The difference between you and Don Quixote is that the dear Don attacked the windmill and got slapped to the ground. You get smacked around defending the windmill's right to be a giant.
You defend the indefensible with half-understood sophistry, Nick. The sad thing is that you are a smart guy who can't differentiate between what he knows and what he thinks he knows. You are being instructed here. Learn, or not, as is your wont.
R
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wrote:

It's not going to matter how strong the closet rod is if there are only two brackets holding it up and they pull out of the wall.
Ms P
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ms_peacock wrote:

True, but I don't think that's the weak spot in the system...unless some Fred uses a couple or three plastic screw-in drywall anchors to hold up the bracket.
R
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wrote:

company always used thick-wall galvanized pipe for the closet rods- until I saw other closets in my teens, I thought everyone did. Never saw a 10-foot rod, but they used to make purpose-built brackets to brace the center of the shelf that included a half-loop to support the rod, and allowed hangers to slide past. The stiff-leg was at an angle that just barely cleared the hanger loop plus most clothes. A thick coat might not get past it.
I do recall seeing J-shaped metal channel, like used for fire doors, that would probably work in a closet. Make a box section or two to tie the shelf to the ceiling, and bolt the top edge of the J-channel to the shelf. Take a lot of art to make it pretty, though- it would definitely be an industrial look.
Realistically, unless you can find the special brackets I remember from my youth, I'd say bust it in to two runs, with a column of box shelves up the middle. What sort of doors will this mega-closet have? Sounds like an eight-foot opening, minimum, which means multiple doors or custom ones. Bypass sliders always have an annoying dead spot in the middle anyway.
aem sends...
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Actor123 wrote:

You don't need a pole, you need a track...something that can be securely mounted to the ceiling structure and which has a slot or "J" for carriers.
If you really want to organize, split up the long wall into 3-4 sections. No problem with poles that way and you can get much more hanging space because a section can have two poles - one high, one low - for things that are short like suits/shirts.
-- dadiOH ____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.06... ...a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
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Take the spar from the wing of an airplane.
Any pipe able to take the weight with no say is probably to thick to accept a hanger and anything wood will sag. It may be possible to fabricate a vertical structure that can take the weight, but it will have to be so high that a hanger will not lay properly. I'd guess that a 6" section of 1" plywood would work.
Personally, I'd plan on at least a center support.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



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There are closet poles that are supported at the bottom to allow hangers to be slide over the supports. It is not practical to have a 10-foot pole that is not supported in the middle--anything over 4 feet will sag unless you are hanging feather boas.

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Closetmaid has brackets for their poles that are designed to let clothes hangers pass over them smoothly. It is sort of a "J" shaped bracket and supports the pole from underneath. I think that it will only work with the Closetmaid shelves. You can buy Closetmaid at Home Depot and Lowes.
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closet maid has a line called superslide that can create an unlimited length of rod
http://www.closetmaid.com/Look/Product_Catalog/product.cfm?item_numberV32&keyword=superslide

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Use a 10' length of 3/4 " galvenized ( or black ) iron pipe.
<rj>
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