Long closet pole

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Hi all:
I am doing a remodel that will result in a rather large walk-in closet. Along one of the longer walls I would like to have a long closet pole for hanging clothes. The thing is, I would prefer not to have any braces or brackets during the run of the pole, just at the ends. This is because I prefer to be able to slide all the clothes around a lot, as it makes organization much easier.
I realize most closet poles are not strong enough to support that kind of weight without brackets to the wall every few feet. I am looking for approximately a 10' span with no brackets in the middle.
Has anyone encountered this situation and been able to come up with a solution. I was thinking of a steel pole of some sort, which I imagine I could find strong enough to support the weight. The other issue would be the brackets on both ends, which would obviously be supporting quite a lot of weight as well, so I was thinking not just bracing the ends to the wall but to the floow as well.
Any suggestions?
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I think you're out of luck. You can't hang 300 pounds of clothes on a 10' pole and not have it sag
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

10' of clothes would probably weigh a lot more than 300 pounds.
As far as having a 10' pole with no intermediate supports - nope, no way and it's not even close.
R
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Doesn't seem possible unless you use a piece of steel tubing. Note the deflection of a beam supported on both ends is proportional to the cube of its length.

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Actor123 wrote:

You find a need to slide clothes more than a few inches or a foot? Why?
I don't see how a single support in the middle would cause a major problem. Aren't you going to have shelving above the closet rod? What supports the shelving?
R
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I built an 8' tall x 6' wide clothes rack with 2 rods with some of my 6-ton $500 collection of P5500 Unistrut from a dismantled warehouse. It's a large erector set, mostly in 18' 45-pound lengths of 12 ga steel in 2x3 U-shapes with one narrow open side and internal flanges to hold special Unistrut nuts against the inside of the flanges with 1/2" bolts and connectors outside. B-Line also makes Unistrut-standard stuff.
The clothes rods have the open side of the U facing up, and hangers sit and slide nicely in the slots. The ends of the rods are attached to the 8' columns (with the webs facing out) with 1/2" Unistrut nuts and bolts and 90 degree Unistrut fittings. Each column is bolted to a 6' floor rod parallel to the clothes rods and a 2' floor rod perpendicular to the 6' rod (with all the floor rods open side up) with a straight shelf connector that I bent to 90 degrees with an oxy-acetylene torch and 3 1/2" Unistrut nuts and bolts. Tightened up with a long-handled 1/2" socket wrench, the nuts and bolts are as strong as welds. The beam loading table in the 2002 Unistrut General Engineering Catalog (No. 14, North American Edition) says the rods can hold up to 1090 pounds each, with a max deflection of 0.34 inches... 10' rods could hold 660 pounds with a 0.96 inch deflection.
If that's too much, you might enjoy the P5001 shape (like 2 2x4s stacked on edge), with a 2260 pound load and 0.31 inch deflection for a 10' span. Its columns could each support 6950 pounds, on a strong floor.
Nick
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A 20' P5501 rod could hold 330 pounds with a 3.82" deflection.

And a 20' P5001 rod could hold 1130 pounds with a 1.24" deflection.
Nick
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snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

Are you sure about that?
--
Cheers,
Bev
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Must be British pounds. 1130 pound notes might do it.
Gary
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Gary Heston snipped-for-privacy@hiwaay.net I don\'t need an iPod, I have an IQ.

A worthwhile endeavour:
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The Real Bev wrote:

If you believe what you read... http://tinyurl.com/qaa3n
We're all just one big Usenet family, huh?!
JP *********************************** I'm not Jeff Davis.
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Jay Pique wrote:

What does it matter what it could hold? A hanger wouldn't fit on it. You might as well suggest using a I-joist for closet rod.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

Yeah, the word "rod" confused me as well. I was just responding to Bev's question about the deflection of P5001. I suppose he could hang some individual sliding rods underneath it or something. Custom hangers?
JP
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Jay Pique wrote:

I still don't see how the same rod will bend more when it carries less weight, and http://tinyurl.com/qaa3n provided no enlightenment.
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wrote:

I think this calculation is correct assuming all the weight is in the middle. If the weight is distributed the full length of the rod the deflectiomn would be a lot less. Even less if heavy items are placed toward the ends.
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Another person, like Nick, who doesn't understand what he reads in a manual. That's the problem with these manuals. They are useful for those who understand them, but potentially dangerous in the hands of others.
Mike
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Michael Daly wrote:

That's why the PE exam is open book. Having the book doesn't mean someone understands it.
R
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Oh yes. The beam loading table on page 54 of the Unistrut General Engineering Catalog (North American Edition, No. 14, 2002) lists 1.24". Furthermore, deflection d = 5WL^3/(384EI), and the elements of section P5001 table lists the 1-1 axis moment of inertia I = 5.578 in^4. E = 30x10^6 psi makes d = 5x1130lbx240^3in^3/(384x30x10^6lb/in^2x5.578in^4) = 1.22".
Page 17 of the 2001 Cooper B-Line catalog lists a max 1593 pound uniform load and 1.563" deflection for their equivalent B11A shape, which corresponds to a 1130/1593x1.563 = 1.11" deflection with a 1130 pound load, with a note:
Based on simple beam condition using an allowable design stress of 25,000 p[si (172 MPa) in accordance with MFMA, with adequate lateral bracing (see page 11 for further explanation.) Actual yield point of cold rolled steel is 42,000 psi.
Nick
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snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

So I guess that you'd bend up your own hangers with that strut since any typical hanger wouldn't come close to fitting.
Kind of makes your numerical exercise pointless, don't you think? Nevermind, you've already answered that question.
R
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Typical hangers fit fine on the P5500 shape. Others may require hangar modification. Then again, few people own that many clothes :-)
Nick
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On 12-Mar-2006, snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

But the P5500 will only support 260lb over 10 feet or 26 lb/ft. That may not be enough to support clothes for some people.

I've know someone who converted an extra bedroom into a closet. Four walls, none shorter than 10', covered with one (long clothes) or two (shirts, jackets) hanger rods. Plus loads of shoe shelves and drawers in the middle of the room.
My ex has a closet that is 12' long and full! That doesn't include what's in the closets in the other rooms.
Something tells me that Nick isn't married to a typical woman. :-)
Mike
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