Loctite too strong

My neighbor is trying to remove a sending unit on his engine block that was installed with loctite. He said the sending unite feel like it would break off before the it would back it out of its thread. What trick the mechanics use to remove bolts that's installed with loctite?
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wrote:

Why would you loctite a sensor? You use anti-sieze on sensors
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On Mon, 14 Aug 2006 23:46:20 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I used 'removable' thread locker on my CTS. It was recommended.
later,
tom @ www.BlankHelp.com
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Previous mechanic installed new sensing unit, few years ago according to neighbor, used loctite.
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Loctite comes in at least 3 grades. One being considered permanent. Not something that should be used on anything that's ever supposed to come apart again.
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# Fred # wrote:

Hmmm, Try when engine is hot.
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Heat. If the sending unit is bad - a torch. If you want to try to salvage it, a heat gun.
Tony Hwang wrote:

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Hi, Don't know how well a torch would work on something like this, as many of these Sensors-Sending Units have plastic on them. (Although what will be going into the engine-manifold should be some sort of metal)
A milder, less drastic method, might be the use of a soldering iron to heat the area.
I've found that many times, using a mild-medium strength threadlocker, like Loctite #242 on small machine screws in effect is virtually permanent. This is where a Soldering Iron applied to the screw head can work wonders, and it might help here?
The other thing is, is that sometimes, there are special made sockets for removing sending units-sensors, and might be in this particular case?
Hope this helps, Mark
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Sure, that's why I indicated that if the goal is to preserve it, then try something more benign like a heat gun.
But, if it is already failed and it prevents proper repair by being stuck, then use the torch.
I assumed that the stuck part it was metal to metal - or else the loctite wouldn't be a problem to begin with.
Mark D'Ambrosio wrote:

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From http://www.loctite.com/int_henkel/loctite_us/index.cfm?&pageid '6&layout=2
Q: How can I remove a fastener that is "permanently" locked in? A: The application of heat is needed to remove a fastener that can't be removed with a hand tool. Temperatures of 325F and above is needed to break down a standard anaerobic, 500F for high temperature Anaerobics. A heat gun or propane torch is commonly used to do this process, and careful disassembly should occur while parts are still hot. Once apart, and cooled, use methylene chloride (Chisel #79040) to remove cured excess material. Always wipe down the fasteners with clean up solvent to remove the wax film that Chisel leaves on the surface.
Never heard of Chisel. Google is your friend. Would need an accurate description of the item to suggest what to use when putting in the new part.
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Heat. Loctite will come loose if you heat it up with a torch.
Thought you were supposed to put sensors in with thread sealant like Rectorseal and teflon tape. Or copper based Never Sieze.
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
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# Fred # wrote:

Shouldn't use loctite, teflon tape or other anti-sieze, anyway.
Best method is a six-point socket and a heavy ratchet or breaker bar. Don't pull on the handle though, smack the end of it with the biggest hammer you can find. The shock should break it loose. If you can't get a socket to fit over the sensor, break all of the plastic stuff off with a chisel/screwdriver leaving only the brass.
Bringing the engine up to operating temperature may help, theoretically the sensor will cool faster and 'shrink' slightly. If you do it this way don't take the sensor out all of the way until the pressure in the cooling sytem is relieved or you will have a miniature old faithfull shooting out boiling water/coolant.
If you try the torch/iron/heat gun method you want to try and heat the area around the sensor not the sensor itself.
I would skip all the heating stuff and just go for the first method. If there is *no* possible way to get a socket on it pipe wrench should tear it right out.
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wrote:

I've not run into this problem myself, but I've been told in the past:
1. A sharp tap with a hammer might lossen stuck lock-tite.
2. Heating, might help reliquidfy it.
3. Pentrating oil can help.
Like I said, just passing information I've been told over time.
later,
tom @ www.NoCostAds.com
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I had a similar problem, I guess it could have had Loctite on it. After I broke it off I used an EZ out, a big pull handle and a torch.
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wrote:
:My neighbor is trying to remove a sending unit on his engine block that was :installed with loctite. He said the sending unite feel like it would break :off before the it would back it out of its thread. What trick the mechanics :use to remove bolts that's installed with loctite? : I'm somebody said this, but there are different grades of loctite, and obviously you don't use the tightest grade if there's ANY chance you will want/need to remove the part some time in the future. When I bought some, I got the medium grade for this reason.
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