local TV what antenna?

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On Sun, 7 Oct 2007 17:11:03 -0500, "J. Davidson"

P&M
I presume you have a coaxial cable connector on the back of your tv? A silver colored little thimble like thing, but not tapered, with threads on the outside?
What I would try first is a thin piece of non-stranded (single thread) wire, insulated if possible, with the insulation stripped off the inch at one end, and stuff that wire into the little hole in the center of the coaxial connector on the back of the tv. You can put it in a half inch, or even maybe an inch if it goes that far. Although even a tiny bit, a mm. or two, is enough to work, but it might fall out.
The wire should be as thin or thinner than the wire that sticks out of a coaxial cable connector with the threads on the inside. You can use one of the strands in a piece of 4-conductor phone line, for example, or just about anything.
While commercially sold antennas are stiff and stick up, those aren't very inportant characteristics. Stiff is only useful so that one can put the antenna where he wants it, but I just let it run down the back of the tv and the tv-table to the floor. Sticking up, as opposed to dangling down is only important if the stations are far enough away that reception is marginal, and even then one could hook the wire to the curtains or a shelf or a brad in the wall if necessary. I'm sure it won't hurt to wrap the last half inch of the wire once or twice around the brad, although that half inch won't function as an antenna anymore. (becuase it is in a circle and the induced currents in it will be in all directions and will cancel each other out)
If the stations in Memphis are near enough reception will be ok to great with anything although low stations like 2, 3, and 4, require a piece of wire that is at least 3 feet long. Higher number stations usually don't require that, but you probalby want to get channel 2 also. 30 or 40 or 50 miles is where tv reception fades away, and if the broadcast antenna is that far away, it can matter if you are on a hill or in a valley, even a tiny valley like I'm in. It can also matter what floor you are on. The basement can be bad.
Finally, although SONY usually works well, after that I find that one can't predict quality of reception by brand. I have local stations in Baltiomre, and others in DC, and some tv's will get channels 4, 5, 7, and 9 in DC, but most will only get 3 of them, and which 3 varies. Others will only get 2 or 1. I have maybe tv's of all ages and brands going through here over the last 24 years, so I think my sample is pretty good. Neither brand nor age is a good predictor of how many DC stations they will get, although all of them get the Baltimore stations.
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You want the best, go with Winegard, they are awesome:
http://www.winegard.com/offair/products.htm
Also consider that VHF analog broadcasts will be gone in short time, so an antenna that favors UHF reception would be better for over the air High Definition which is broadcast digitally in UHF. The HD8200P should be fine if you still need good VHF reception now, and should do outstandingly well for everything in the future and current HD broadcasts.
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On Mon, 08 Oct 2007 05:09:39 -0700, RickH

Most of the newer TV stations around here use UHF, but there's an interesting exception. The local ABC station broadcasts digitally on channel 10.
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how many tvs are you watching at the same time? if its usually 4 or less you can run a cable from one or two of the satellite receivers add a switch with infrared remote extender and control your satellite receiver and watch it from tv number 5
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UHF TV channels above 51 are being phased out to accommodate cell phone and other uses. As far as I know, all the current VHF frequencies will remain available for DTV, and current analog VHF stations will be allowed to switch their digital signal to their VHF allocation when analog TV dies in 2009.
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On Mon, 8 Oct 2007 18:01:09 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@newsguy.com (Neill Massello) wrote:

One of the stations here (NBC) broadcasts analog on 56, but the digital version is on 22.
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