load bearing wall

Hi everyone. My wife and I would like to expand our kitchen, and we really can't discuss possibilities because we aren't sure which, if any of the walls in our kitchen are load bearing. Obviously if one is, that would kill the idea of removing that wall. How can I tell if a wall is load bearing? (If my roof trusses run north-south, would my load bearing wall(s) run east-west, or north-south?) Thanks for any advice, don't plan on knocking out any wall soon, just want to discuss possibilities first.
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If the roof is in fact made with trusses, they most probably span from outer wall to outer wall. TB
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If the home is a ranch home with roof trusses, then no interior wall o
the main floor is a bearing wall except for the outside walls.
If the home is a multi-story home, then the bearing walls will ru perpendicular to the roof trusses and floor joists.
You should a professional determine which walls are bearing wall before spinning your wheels, however
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Given the word "probably", would you take the wall down if it was in your house?
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Eric and Megan Swope wrote:

One story or two? Generally load bearing walls will be perpendicular to the joist above them.
Since there are a lot of variables. I strongly suggest seeking a professional opinion before going too far.
--
Joseph Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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Any wall can be load bearing . You need a pro to look at your house and figure what is best. Putting in a support beam either way is a safe aproach and not usualy to difficult. I don`t think it is a job for you to learn on though. Who ever you hire be sure he is insured for liability to your home should problems arise to your structure.
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Hire a structural engineer. Or ask a friend in the construction trade or related business to come take a look at your house.
Even if the wall is load bearing, you can still span it and tear down. Nothing is impossible. It just takes more work and a heftier budget.
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If your wall is parallel to the floor and ceiling joists, then it is PROBABLY not a load bearing wall. If there are support pillars directly underneath this wall in the basement, then you need to look further.
As has been pointed out in earlier posts, call out a pro. This is serious stuff, you misdiagnose this wall, and you'll be taking up camping real soon.
Your municipality may also require a building permit for removing a wall.
Mr Fixit eh
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