liquid vapor barrier

I have a 100 year old house and was thinking of a few ways that I could save on insulating and vapor barrier. The house has already been re-drywalled once laminated over the existing plaster by the former owner so I would rather not get into a huge reno that for certain reasons is not required. I know one of the ways to vapor barrier can be achieved by stuccoing the exterior walls but that is even more expensive. One of the advantages to stucco is that the vapor barrier ends of being on the exterior protecting every thing behind it which in my case is the bricks, wood firing channel and drywall.
So my cheap alternative to something expensive was to use a product such as Thompson water seal as an exterior vapor barrier given that it's duty is to protect bricks from moisture thus perhaps sealing the house. Fill in any cracks with concrete or some other product, spray over with the water seal and Voil. Does anyone know of a product that can do this or is Thompson's products good enough?
Thanks,
Carl
http://www.gaihosa.com
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wrote:

ahh vapor barriers are supposed to go inside, like immediately under the drywall.
this is easiest done by using vapor barrier paint..........
does your home have a outside water problem? start with the basics, gutters clean etc etc
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

If you are insulating in a cold climate, the vapor barrier goes on the inside wall. If placed on the outside, vapor will condense in the insulation and rot/mold.
Insulating in a warm climate is opposite.
If you do need to place barrier on the inside, a coat of low-permeability paint will do the job. Glidden (ICI) makes Prep and Prime # 1060-1200 to name one.
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They used to sell silicon in a solvent liquid that you sprayed/brushed on the outside masonry to make it waterproof to the weather. I saw it still in a hardware store a few years ago. However, I understand it lost popularity because of causing spalling of bricks in some cases, and it required repeated applications because it deteriorated with the sun.
This was not a vapour barrier, as that is to be applied on the inside of the house to prevent household water vapour from penetrating the wall framing and insulation and condensing on the outside sheathing/covering.
I have a 100 year old house and was thinking of a few ways that I could save on insulating and vapor barrier. The house has already been re-drywalled once laminated over the existing plaster by the former owner so I would rather not get into a huge reno that for certain reasons is not required. I know one of the ways to vapor barrier can be achieved by stuccoing the exterior walls but that is even more expensive. One of the advantages to stucco is that the vapor barrier ends of being on the exterior protecting every thing behind it which in my case is the bricks, wood firing channel and drywall.
So my cheap alternative to something expensive was to use a product such as Thompson water seal as an exterior vapor barrier given that it's duty is to protect bricks from moisture thus perhaps sealing the house. Fill in any cracks with concrete or some other product, spray over with the water seal and Voil. Does anyone know of a product that can do this or is Thompson's products good enough?
Thanks,
Carl
http://www.gaihosa.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
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