Lightning protection AND putting a receptacle on UPS

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Thanks SQLit. I do indeed want to avoid wasting money.
I think that there is a cost/benefit ratio at work here and spending thousands of $$, to protect equipment worth thousands of $$s, against an unlikely event, does not make sense.
So... I do not need protection against direct lightning strike that blows up all wiring, I rather want to be protected against lower power, but more frequent events such as the one that already happened near my house 3 years ago.
I will use cheap used APC 2200 UPSes for the expensive stuff.
I may use a whole house protector also.
You made an excellent point on grounding the dish. I will also try to use some sort of surge protection on the TV cables.
i
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The Soares book is an excellent source of translating code requirements into useful examples. That is grounding for human protection. Grounding for transient protection must enhance that system. Soares is about human safety. Here, we are discussing the same system enhanced for transistor safety.
Every incoming wire must connect to the same earth ground. That is now required for human safety - including a 20 foot or less wire connection. For example cable and dish wires should be earthed to same AC electric earth ground before entering building. Neither requires a surge protector. Surge protector is only a temporary connection to earth. But both wires are connected to earth by a dedicated wire. Therefore protector would do little more.
How each utility connects to earth include things not required by NEC nor in that Soares book. For example, earthing wire must remain separated from all other wires. Wires must have no sharp bends, no splices, meet only at a common point. Wires should be 'less than 10 feet' which is beyond what is required by code. Every foot shorter means increased protection.
Geology is an important part of protection analysis. Some locations can be sufficiently earthed with only a single ground rod. Others require extensive earthing to be equivalent. In your case, an AC controller should probably be mounted on equipotential earth - previous references to a halo ground.
If one needs better protection, then one starts by enhancing the earthing system. That is often a largest weakness in any protection system. That is where bucks can often return more value - which is why bucks spent on plug-in protectors would be better spent first on enhancing the earthing system.
If lightning is a major threat, then lightning rods are also part of the protection system. What determines lightning rod effectiveness? Earthing. How those lightning rods do and do not connect to the building earthing system is also important - part of the art.
Ignoramus32515 wrote:

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Thanks Tom. I asked you in another post to describe just what is the exact scenario for a common mode surge that an ordinary UPS cannot properly take care of. I am very interested to find out.
i
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This picture of a fax machine protection may also demonstrate the protection. This picture has one problem. Phone line protector uses water pipe. Pipes are typically too long, have solder joints, etc. All contribute to too much impedance. IOW if that water pipe is too long, sharp turns, etc, then the surge may just enter on telephone line, pass through fax, then get earth ground from AC electric.
Just another example of protection from common mode transients: http://www.epri-peac.com/tutorials/sol01tut.html
Ignoramus32515 wrote:

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"Ignoramus32515 So... I do not need protection against direct lightning strike that blows up all wiring, I rather want to be protected against lower power, but more frequent events such as the one that already happened near my house 3 years ago.
I will use cheap used APC 2200 UPSes for the expensive stuff.
I may use a whole house protector also. "
Since that is still your belief, I think we should all just give up on you, as you still obviously haven't understood anything that's been said. Go put those UPS's on your furnace and TV and make yourself happy!
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