Lightning protection AND putting a receptacle on UPS

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We bought an expensive TV.
Our house is on top of a little hill, but still the tallest in the area, and was hit by lighting 3 years ago:
http://igor.chudov.com/tmp/lightning /
I want to redo some things in the house so that some things are done better.
Specifically:
1. Replace existing APC 1400 VA UPS that the "consumer electronics" including the TV and various audio/video things is on, with an APC 2200.
2. Since the 2200 UPS is too big to hide it near the TV, and too ugly (I bought a few military surplus used ones) and unsightly, we want to put it in the basement below the TV area and route the circuit through it. That is, the UPS would be in series with that receptacle.
Is it safe to wire a receptacle to be on a UPS 100% of the time?
3. I want to install surge protection not only on the incoming power line (which the APC 2200 should take care of), but also on the "dish" cable.
What kinds of options do I have?
4. Install a proper lightning rod. I already have a copper rod beaten into the ground. Can I connect my lightning rod to it? Or do I need a separate grounding rod?
i
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Ignoramus10397 wrote:

Why are you running a TV on a UPS? UPS is good for some computer type applications where you want a little time time to save what you have been working on. Surely you can live with out the TV for a short while.

???? I am not at all sure what you are talking about here.

I recommend whole house surge protection, but I also suggest real (as in more than the $10.00 jobs at the home store) point source surge protection in addition for all your sensitive expensive equipment.

Have a professional come out and give you an estimate for a proper lightning protection scheme. Call your insurance company and talk to them. They may offer discounts for properly installed professional work. Lightning protection is not a DIY thing. You can make it worse not better.
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wrote:

Well, actually. it would be nice to turn on the TV to see local news or some such. Plus, a UPS provides great protection from bad power.

I am talking about plugging a UPS so that the receptacle (not an extension cord, but a receptacls in the wall) is powered by a UPS.
Circuit Breaker panel ----- APC UPS ---- Receptacle

That's interesting, would you point me to some example product?

Aha, that's helpful to know. I will check around a little bit, you see, it is useful to be informed before talking to any professionals.
i
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Ignoramus10397 wrote:

I suggest a good generator setup and a battery powered radio.

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wrote:

I already have an Onan diesel generator:
http://igor.chudov.com/tmp/onan/Diesel /
I restored it after having bought it from the military. For short outages, it does not make sense to run to the generator, etc, all for the sake of 10 minutes. We usually wait for a while.
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"3. I want to install surge protection not only on the incoming power line (which the APC 2200 should take care of), but also on the "dish" cable. "
A UPS is a poor substitute for proper surge protection, which should be located at the service panel and have a very short path to a single point earth ground. There it will be effective because of the short ground and will also protect all the electrical eqpt in the house. A secondary surge protection located near the equipment it's intended to protect can serve as secondary protection or for situations where whole house protection is not possible, eg a rental apartment. But it will never be as effective because it relies on the house wiring to get to an earth ground. And the impedance present between whatever place it's connected in the house and the earth ground will be enough to greatly diminish it's effectiveness. Plus, if something does take a hit, I'd rather replace a $100 surge protector at the panel than a $1000 UPS.
Unless you live in an area with frequent power problems, like short outages, or brownouts, or have some mission critical computer applications, IMO, a UPS is waste of money. And I think a UPS is pretty usless for any type of TV, which only needs surge protection.
As far as installing lightening rods, if you want to do that, I would only have that done by a professional. For it to be effective, you need to have it done right. Plus an incorrect install could be worse than having none at all.
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wrote:

Make it a $15 UPS.

Thanks. I would like to read a little bit about what it entails, so that I make right choices when talking to those professionals.
i
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Details on effective protection solutions recently were provided in the alt.windows-me newsgroup on 18 Dec 2005 entitled "Dead Computer :-)" also at: http://tinyurl.com/99ho2
Ignoramus10397 wrote:

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Very interesting, I am reading it.
I must note: when a lightning hit the tree next to our house, all out computers and all electronics were on UPSes. None was hurt. The board in the AC controller, though, did get fried.
i

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Damage is about a complete electrical path. Some things are in that path created by lightning and might be damaged Others are not.
Why a single point ground? Learn why cows, for example, are killed by a tree strike. Lightning did not hit the cow. Why did the cow die? Because electricity also flowed through the cow. Shortest electrical path was from cloud, to tree, into earth, up cow's hind leg, down cow's fore leg, then on to earthborne charges located maybe miles away.
So what in your house would have been in that same electrical path? Apparently the AC controller was in a destructive path. Maybe incoming up from earth - then outgoing via breaker box earth ground. Other electronics were not in a complete circuit - therefore not damaged.
How do we protect a cow? Surround a cow with a buried earth ground - a halo ground. Cow is standing on equipotential earth. How to protect your AC controller? Same. Another example of why we demand single point ground. Is your case, a halo ground - part of the single point earthing system - would make earth beneath that AC controller equipotential.
BTW, if we built homes to protect transistors, then Ufer grounds would be standard. Unfortunately, protection is still an after thought - which is why APC sells protectors at tens of times more money per protected appliance.
This also explains why buildings with utilities connected to different earth grounds may suffer damage.
There is no magic force that caused damage. Smoke detectors and GFCIs - not on APC protectors - also were not damaged. What protected them? Same thing that protected other electronics. APC hopes you never learn this.
Your question only listed selective examples. Good science includes the entire list of damaged and undamaged transistors. That APC solution provided no effective protection. Why? Electronics already have effective internal protection. Protection that may be overwhelmed without a 'building wide' protection system involving 'whole house' protector and the most critical protection component - single point earth ground.
This concept is was explained in that other discussion. APC did what they could so that you never learn about earthing.
Ignoramus10397 wrote:

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Ignoramus10397 wrote:

Lightning is a funny thing from the standpoint of what it will damage and not. I had a lightning strike three feet from the A/C condensing unit and it blew out one circuit board in the A/C, noting else in the home was damaged. That included a number of electronic devices that are sensitive to surges. That was before I had whole house protection. It did trip the Circuit breaker for the A/C
I only had one UPS and two computers at the time, the one without the UPS was the only one turned on.
I suggest that you likely would not have suffered any damage, even without the UPS. I might also point out that it is very unlikely all your electronics were on UPS. Do you have a microwave, or digital clocks, etc?

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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

AND for protection from surges generated within the home.

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APC for a " tv and various audio/video things "...
So why you need APC? if you are out of power you could finish watching last 30 min of american idol?
Why, any show that worth anything will have about 20 - 30 reruns. Well unless it is Bush speech, cause noone can handle his speech in reruns, small bits and you can stil see Cheney in the background pulling strings attached Bushes mouth.
Get whole house surge suppressor.
4 not
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Why not. I do not watch TV at all, but I have no problem with my wife wanting to finish whatever she is watching.

sounds like getting a whole house surge suppressor is a good idea.
i

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Lightning can just as easily come in your satellite dish, cable , antenna, phone or no apparent line and affect your tv. You have alot to protect. A mains surge plus lightning arrestor are a good place to start
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Ignoramus10397 wrote:

a surge protector does not protect you from lightning
what you want is a lightning arrestor
surge protector only resolves mild surges from your local power company (and they do surge)
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Is a APC 2200 UPS adequate for lightning?
You see, I am not paying a lot of money for these UPSes. I just got four of them for $60 total, this morning. I can easily use them if they offer some benefits.
i
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"Ignoramus10397"

no, a surge protector is not fast enough to stop lightning. we talking nanoseconds, like...under 5 nanoseconds and circuits are fried.
the arrestor is super fast,(like inside of 5 nanoseconds) it creates a bottleneck to regulate the flow.
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Trip lite advertises 0 or 1 nanosecond response I think for their better outlet strips, there are phone , power and maybe coaxial ones also in one unit .
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m Ransley wrote:

work fine, but only once when the oxide gets punched. But there's no way to tell if they have been damaged!
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