Lighting electrical question

I have been getting conflicting information. Scenario: I am installing recessed lights.
amps per light (75 watt divided by 120 volts = 0.625 amps) 80% rule to circuit loading = 12 amps divide amps per light = 19 lamps This seems like an awful lot on one circuit. Even using 100 watts per light would put 15 lights on the circuit. I had read that 10-12 should be the max.
Opinions please. thank you.
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somebody comes along behind you and wants it brighter what's the largest sized bulbs do you think they're likely to find that they can cram into those recessed cans after they remove the trim rings.

light
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You are both right but you are missing one point. When you install 14, 12 and 10 guage wire (the ones likely to have receptacles) the code builds in the 80% safety factor in the breaker you are allowed to use. They know the installer has no control over what the user will plug in. Look at 310.16 and you see 14 ga copper is good for 20a but 240.4(D) limits the breaker to 15a. There is your 80%. There are also rules about the size of any single piece of plug connected equipment and that can be 80% or even 50% in the case of a fixed in place unit. That uses the 240.4(D) breaker size.
There are also exceptions that could allow up to a 40a breaker on 14ga wire but we don't need to kick that tar baby. ;-)

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jack wrote:

Hi, How about florescent lamps? Lots of room. Or even LED ones(expensive yet) Tony
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A 15a circuit has a capacity of 1800 watts, or 1440 watts for an 80% load.
1440 / 75 watts = 19 fixtures. But since most recessed cans will easily accept a 150 w lamp with the appropriate trim, or no trim at all, some inspectors like to see no more than 9.
Then there are full size cans which accept R-40 size lamps, (generally 150 watt) medium which accept up to R-30,(generally 75 watt) and small cans which accept up to R-20.(generally 40-60 watt) Since any of these lamps are available up to 150 watts (and there are par lamps of 250 watts as well) an inspector who is a stickler for the rules may demand a 180 watt calculation per can no matter what size it is. IME no inspector has balked at placing a few more smaller cans on a circuit even if they are somewhat picky.
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com
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1500W of heat may be a inconvinient in the summer, consider fluorescent that screw right in the same holder. They are more expensive but will pay for themselves (if do not fail). Screw in, built in ballast fluorescents turn on slowly though.
MG
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